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xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/10/20. Abstract

Research and development (R&D) is a significant component of quality higher education. This is quite understandable and appreciable because R&D, most especially in Science and Technology (S&T), has become the most enduring and effective means of improving sustainable economic growth, development and re-enforcing competitiveness in industries in a rapidly changing world. Universities are widely regarded not only as teaching establishments but also as organisations that create new knowledge and innovation through research. Many academics are of the opinion that doing research improves their teaching (Colbeck, 1998, 2002; Gamson, 1995; Stevans and Reingold, 2000; Robertson and Bond, 2001; Wenzel, 2001; Winkler, 1992a, b; Woolcock, 1997; Zamorski, 2002; in Begum, 2006). In recent times, universities often use evidence of research excellenceto employ or promote staff. The main claim of the teachers and administrators are that research activity can and does serve as an important mode of teaching and a valuable means of learning and thus research is a strong condition for teaching.R&D is one of the main thrusts of activities of western universities. The developed nations have clearly demonstrated that one of the most potent means of achieving developmental goals is effective building of capability in Research and Development. They have also demonstrated the relevance of effective collaboration to sustainable scientific and technological advancement (Boozeman and Lee, 2003). To corroborate this, Ehikhamenor (2003) opined that scientific productivity, in the form of intellectual contributions to the advancement of S&T, is a fundamental consideration in the scientific enterprise. A crucial requirement for
productivity and development in S&T is a system of communication among scientists and the dissemination of scientific information. Productive R&D is expected to lead to new product(s) development or improvement of existing product(s), new process development or improvement of existing process, patents, copyrights and publications. Scientific publication is a sign of good quality of invention and research outputs. Patents, copyrights, and funds from companies are signs that those inventions have market potentials (Carneiro, 2000; Werner and Souder, 1997; in Numprasertchai and Igel, 2005). Tangible R&D outcomes should promote the link between academia and the industry. However, many private and public organizations in Nigeria are skeptical about R&D outcomes from the universities and in many cases the needs of these organisations are not met. These invariably have further widened the gap between universities and industries (Oyebisi et al., 1996).
Many studies on research productivity and collaborations include an underlining assumption that collaborative activities increase research productivity (Duque et al., 2005). However, there is a dearth of information on the validity of this proposition in Nigeria. Are Nigerian researchers collaborating for R&D among themselves and with others outside their institutions? What factors inhibit collaboration activities of researchers? What influence do researchers’ collaborations have on their R&D productivity? These are some of the pertinent questions addressed in this study. For the survey, 457 copies of questionnaire were randomly distributed among lecturers. 274 of these were returned and found useful (60% response rate). The field respondents were from Faculties of Agriculture (30.8%), Science (38.8%) and Engineering/Technology (30.4%). In assessing R&D productivity of researchers we adopt the partial productivity approach. Researchers’ publications were used as output and the number of years spent to produce the publications as input (in this study 5 years, (2004 – 2008)). The normal count (of output), which is the most frequently used approach, is adopted. The outcome of the study indicated a positive relationship between R&D productivity and collaboration. This is in agreement with some previous studies on the subject of research productivity and collaboration (Lee and Bozeman, 2005; Landry et al., 1996; Harman, 1999; in Rijnsoever et al., 2008, Walsh and Maloney, 2003; in Duque et. al., (2005)

Adesina, F, Odekunle T, Ajayi O, Eludoyin A, Babatimehin O, DAMI A, Sanni M, Aloba O, Magare A, Adetiloye OT.  2010.  Adaptation Strategies of Action for Nigeria, 2010/06/18. Abstract
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Adesina, F, Odekunle T, Ajayi O, Eludoyin A, Babatimehin O, DAMI A, Sanni M, Aloba O, Magare A, Adetiloye OT.  2010.  Adaptation Strategies of Action for Nigeria, 2010/06/18. Abstract
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Adesina, F, Odekunle T, Ajayi O, Eludoyin A, Babatimehin O, DAMI A, Sanni M, Aloba O, Magare A, Adetiloye OT.  2010.  Adaptation Strategies of Action for Nigeria, 2010/06/18. Abstract
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xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/06/10. Abstract
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Nwhator, S, Ogunbodede E, Adedigba M, Sagay E.  2010.  Prognostic Indicators of Gingival Recession in Nigeria: Preliminary Findings, 2010/06/01. TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin. 9 Abstract

AIM: Literature is replete with studies on gingival recession, the apical shift of the gingival margin from the cemento-enamel junction. Chronic periodontitis and frequent toothbrushing are among its aetiological factors. Many of these were however prevalence studies. The current study was therefore aimed at separating prognostic indicators from determinants of the number of recessions. METHOD: 650 consecutive adult patients visiting a Nigerian teaching hospital were examined using a checklist including plaque, calculus, Miller’s class of recession and other parameters.. A total of 408 recession sites were identified. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with recession was 42.3 years; mean number of recession was 4.74 Incisors had the highest number of recessions (35.7%). While a factor such as age was related both to the number and prognosis of recession sites, abrasion and plaque were only related to prognosis. Again, some of the factors previously significantly related to prognosis on univariate analysis like calculus and smoking, lost their significance on regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The three strongest predictors of prognosis (Miller’s class) of recession were age, plaque and abrasion. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(3): 187-194]

Nwhator, S, Ogunbodede E, Adedigba M, Sagay E.  2010.  Prognostic Indicators of Gingival Recession in Nigeria: Preliminary Findings, 2010/06/01. TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin. 9 Abstract

AIM: Literature is replete with studies on gingival recession, the apical shift of the gingival margin from the cemento-enamel junction. Chronic periodontitis and frequent toothbrushing are among its aetiological factors. Many of these were however prevalence studies. The current study was therefore aimed at separating prognostic indicators from determinants of the number of recessions. METHOD: 650 consecutive adult patients visiting a Nigerian teaching hospital were examined using a checklist including plaque, calculus, Miller’s class of recession and other parameters.. A total of 408 recession sites were identified. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with recession was 42.3 years; mean number of recession was 4.74 Incisors had the highest number of recessions (35.7%). While a factor such as age was related both to the number and prognosis of recession sites, abrasion and plaque were only related to prognosis. Again, some of the factors previously significantly related to prognosis on univariate analysis like calculus and smoking, lost their significance on regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The three strongest predictors of prognosis (Miller’s class) of recession were age, plaque and abrasion. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(3): 187-194]

Musa, N, Babalola O, Oyebisi OO.  2010.  Competencies Required of Quantity Surveying, 2010/01/01. Abstract
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Adeniyi, A, Ogunbodede E, Jeboda Sonny O, Sofola O.  2010.  Dental caries occurrence and associated oral hygiene practices among rural and urban Nigerian pre-school children, 2010/01/01. Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene. 1:64-70. Abstract

The objective of this research is to assess the prevalence of dental caries in Nigerian preschool children and establish the proportion of treated lesions and to also investigate the association between oral hygiene habits and dental caries prevalence in the study population. Dental examinations were performed on 404 children aged between 18 months and 5 years and an interview were conducted for the mothers to obtain information about the child and her/his household. The children were recruited from primary health centres where pre-school children are routinely immunized in Lagos State. The prevalence of dental caries in the study population was 10.9%. A significantly higher caries occurrence was observed in children older than 3 years than in those less than 3 years of age (p < 0.001). Caries prevalence was not significantly associated with who supervises the child's tooth-brushing (p = 0.106), type of toothpaste used (p = 0.657) and frequency of tooth brushing (p = 0.774). Oral hygiene score was positively correlated with caries prevalence and the relationship was statistically significant (p < 0.000). While the prevalence of caries in the study was low, the child's age and oral hygiene score were observed to influence the occurrence of caries in the study population.

Adeniyi, A, Ogunbodede E, Jeboda Sonny O, Sofola O.  2010.  Dental caries occurrence and associated oral hygiene practices among rural and urban Nigerian pre-school children, 2010/01/01. Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene. 1:64-70. Abstract

The objective of this research is to assess the prevalence of dental caries in Nigerian preschool children and establish the proportion of treated lesions and to also investigate the association between oral hygiene habits and dental caries prevalence in the study population. Dental examinations were performed on 404 children aged between 18 months and 5 years and an interview were conducted for the mothers to obtain information about the child and her/his household. The children were recruited from primary health centres where pre-school children are routinely immunized in Lagos State. The prevalence of dental caries in the study population was 10.9%. A significantly higher caries occurrence was observed in children older than 3 years than in those less than 3 years of age (p < 0.001). Caries prevalence was not significantly associated with who supervises the child's tooth-brushing (p = 0.106), type of toothpaste used (p = 0.657) and frequency of tooth brushing (p = 0.774). Oral hygiene score was positively correlated with caries prevalence and the relationship was statistically significant (p < 0.000). While the prevalence of caries in the study was low, the child's age and oral hygiene score were observed to influence the occurrence of caries in the study population.

ADESOLA, F.  2010.   National Security in Nigeria’s Relations with its Neighbours. , Saarbrucken (Germany): VDM Verlag Dr. Muller GmbH & Co. KG.
Akindele, S, Adeyemi O.  2010.  Corruption and the Nigerian State: A Critical Discourse. , Saarbrucken, Germany.: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing:
Alao, KA, Kobiowu SV, Adebowale OF.  2010.  Fundamentals of Educational and Counselling Psychology.. , UK: Strategic Insight Publishing. ISBN-10: 1908064048, ISBN-13: 9781908064042
Adeoti, G.  2010.  Aesthetics of adaptation in contemporary Nigerian drama. : Centre for Black and African Arts and Civilization (CBAAC) Abstract
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Adeniyi, A, Ogunbodede E, Sonny Jeboda O, Folayan M.  2009.  Do maternal factors influence the dental health status of Nigerian pre-school children?, 2009/10/01 International journal of paediatric dentistry / the British Paedodontic Society [and] the International Association of Dentistry for Children. 19:448-54. Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the relationship between maternal related factors and the dental health status of pre-school children in Lagos State, Nigeria.A cross-sectional study of 404 pairs of mothers and their pre-school children was conducted at two selected primary health centres in Lagos State Nigeria. An interviewer administered questionnaire recorded the mother's socio-demographic characteristics and assessed her perception of her child's dental needs, attitude to oral disease prevention, level of dental health knowledge and attitude to oral health. The child's dental status was assessed using the dft index (caries status) and the simplified oral hygiene index. Data analysis tools included Spearman's correlation coefficient and multivariate logistic regression.
Maternal age, maternal education, location of residence, maternal knowledge, and attitudes were all positively correlated with the child's caries and oral hygiene status. There were statistically significant correlations between maternal attitude and the oral hygiene index (P = 0.01) and dft score (P = 0.001). Maternal age also had a significant relationship with the child's caries status (P = 0.003).
This study concluded that maternal age and attitude were important determinants of caries experience whereas the mother's attitude was an important determinant of oral cleanliness in pre-school children in Lagos State Nigeria.

Uti, O, Agbelusi G, Olukayode Jeboda S, Ogunbodede E.  2009.  Infection control knowledge and practices related to HIV among Nigerian dentists, 2009/09/01. Journal of infection in developing countries. 3:604-10. Abstract

Many diseases including HIV/AIDS can be transmitted in the dental setting when effective infection control procedures are ignored. The aim of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the infection control knowledge and practices of Nigerian dentists in the era of HIV/AIDS.Information on knowledge of transmission of HIV, occupational vulnerability, infection control practices, and opinion on adequacy of infection control facilities were gathered from dentists through a self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge was assessed on a total score of 20 questions.
Only 3.6% of the dentists had poor knowledge. Younger males and dentists working in teaching hospitals had significantly better knowledge than their counterparts. While 40.8% believed HIV could be transmitted through saliva, only 43.2% knew it could be transmitted through the conjunctiva. Most (93.2%) wore gloves routinely and the most common barrier to glove use was non-availability. Most (79.2%) used autoclaves for sterilization; however, chemical disinfectants and boiling were also used. The majority (72.4%) believed the facilities for infection control in their centres were inadequate. Close to half of the respondents (47.6%; n = 118) rated the occupational risk of becoming infected with HIV as high.
The results of this study have shown that while the level of knowledge of the dentists was generally acceptable, there were still some misconceptions on the transmission and occupational vulnerability of HIV. It also indicates only partial compliance with recommended infection control procedures among Nigerian dentists as a result of inadequate supplies.

Uti, O, Agbelusi G, Olukayode Jeboda S, Ogunbodede E.  2009.  Infection control knowledge and practices related to HIV among Nigerian dentists, 2009/09/01. Journal of infection in developing countries. 3:604-10. Abstract

Many diseases including HIV/AIDS can be transmitted in the dental setting when effective infection control procedures are ignored. The aim of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the infection control knowledge and practices of Nigerian dentists in the era of HIV/AIDS.Information on knowledge of transmission of HIV, occupational vulnerability, infection control practices, and opinion on adequacy of infection control facilities were gathered from dentists through a self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge was assessed on a total score of 20 questions.
Only 3.6% of the dentists had poor knowledge. Younger males and dentists working in teaching hospitals had significantly better knowledge than their counterparts. While 40.8% believed HIV could be transmitted through saliva, only 43.2% knew it could be transmitted through the conjunctiva. Most (93.2%) wore gloves routinely and the most common barrier to glove use was non-availability. Most (79.2%) used autoclaves for sterilization; however, chemical disinfectants and boiling were also used. The majority (72.4%) believed the facilities for infection control in their centres were inadequate. Close to half of the respondents (47.6%; n = 118) rated the occupational risk of becoming infected with HIV as high.
The results of this study have shown that while the level of knowledge of the dentists was generally acceptable, there were still some misconceptions on the transmission and occupational vulnerability of HIV. It also indicates only partial compliance with recommended infection control procedures among Nigerian dentists as a result of inadequate supplies.

Adedigba, M, Naidoo S, Ogunbodede E.  2009.  Cost implications for the treatment of five oral lesions commonly found in HIV/AIDS, 2009/04/01. Odonto-stomatologie tropicale = Tropical dental journal. 32:17-24. Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine the cost of a prescribed treatment plan; to compare the costs in an academic hospital cost with that of private pharmacy; and to determine the average treatment cost per visit. The descriptive, retrospective study that investigated the cost implications of the treatment of five oral lesions associated with HIV/AIDS: oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, periodontal diseases, oral ulcers and Kaposi's sarcoma. One hundred and twenty four cases with oral HIV lesions were selected from the list of 181 HIV patients listed in the attendance registers of three hospitals in the selected study sites. A data capture sheet was used to obtain information related to diagnosis, investigations done, staging of the disease, treatment plan and treatment outcome. None of the patients were on antiretroviral therapy. The association between the number of hospital visits and the total cost of treatment was significant (p < 0.05). Also, there was a significant negative relationship between the outcome of treatment and the total hospital costs (p < 0.05). The lower the hospital treatment cost, the better the outcome. There was no significant association between staging of the disease and the hospital cost (p > 0.05), but the CD4 count significantly influenced the hospital cost (p<0.05). The average hospital treatment and private pharmacy cost was 207.06 and 357.85 rands respectively (16.21 euros and 28.02 euros respectively). There is a need to evaluate the current treatment protocols, as some treatments may be ineffective. Governments should endeavour to provide antiretroviral and other relevant drugs, at no cost, to HIV/AIDS patients.

Ayoh'OMIDIRE, F, Tunde B, Alao A, Onwumah T.  2009.  Ensino e divulgação da história e da cultura da África e da Diáspora Africana . , Lagos: Centre for Black and African Arts and Civilization (CBAAC)
Jaiyeola, TG.  2009.  A Study of New Concepts in Smarandache Quasigroups and Loops. , Ann Arbor: ProQuest Information & Learning
Ogunfolakan, A, Ogundiran A, Oshineye BK, Steyn G, Géloin CG, Mande CI, Martineau J-L, Amutabi CMN, Owino PM, Ojo CO, others.  2009.  Movements, borders, and identities in Africa. 40: University Rochester Press Abstract
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