Publications

Export 4284 results:
Sort by: Author Title [ Type  (Asc)] Year
Book
Uti, O, Agbelusi G, Olukayode Jeboda S, Ogunbodede E.  2009.  Infection control knowledge and practices related to HIV among Nigerian dentists, 2009/09/01. Journal of infection in developing countries. 3:604-10. Abstract

Many diseases including HIV/AIDS can be transmitted in the dental setting when effective infection control procedures are ignored. The aim of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the infection control knowledge and practices of Nigerian dentists in the era of HIV/AIDS.Information on knowledge of transmission of HIV, occupational vulnerability, infection control practices, and opinion on adequacy of infection control facilities were gathered from dentists through a self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge was assessed on a total score of 20 questions.
Only 3.6% of the dentists had poor knowledge. Younger males and dentists working in teaching hospitals had significantly better knowledge than their counterparts. While 40.8% believed HIV could be transmitted through saliva, only 43.2% knew it could be transmitted through the conjunctiva. Most (93.2%) wore gloves routinely and the most common barrier to glove use was non-availability. Most (79.2%) used autoclaves for sterilization; however, chemical disinfectants and boiling were also used. The majority (72.4%) believed the facilities for infection control in their centres were inadequate. Close to half of the respondents (47.6%; n = 118) rated the occupational risk of becoming infected with HIV as high.
The results of this study have shown that while the level of knowledge of the dentists was generally acceptable, there were still some misconceptions on the transmission and occupational vulnerability of HIV. It also indicates only partial compliance with recommended infection control procedures among Nigerian dentists as a result of inadequate supplies.

Adedigba, M, Naidoo S, Ogunbodede E.  2009.  Cost implications for the treatment of five oral lesions commonly found in HIV/AIDS, 2009/04/01. Odonto-stomatologie tropicale = Tropical dental journal. 32:17-24. Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine the cost of a prescribed treatment plan; to compare the costs in an academic hospital cost with that of private pharmacy; and to determine the average treatment cost per visit. The descriptive, retrospective study that investigated the cost implications of the treatment of five oral lesions associated with HIV/AIDS: oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, periodontal diseases, oral ulcers and Kaposi's sarcoma. One hundred and twenty four cases with oral HIV lesions were selected from the list of 181 HIV patients listed in the attendance registers of three hospitals in the selected study sites. A data capture sheet was used to obtain information related to diagnosis, investigations done, staging of the disease, treatment plan and treatment outcome. None of the patients were on antiretroviral therapy. The association between the number of hospital visits and the total cost of treatment was significant (p < 0.05). Also, there was a significant negative relationship between the outcome of treatment and the total hospital costs (p < 0.05). The lower the hospital treatment cost, the better the outcome. There was no significant association between staging of the disease and the hospital cost (p > 0.05), but the CD4 count significantly influenced the hospital cost (p<0.05). The average hospital treatment and private pharmacy cost was 207.06 and 357.85 rands respectively (16.21 euros and 28.02 euros respectively). There is a need to evaluate the current treatment protocols, as some treatments may be ineffective. Governments should endeavour to provide antiretroviral and other relevant drugs, at no cost, to HIV/AIDS patients.

Ayoh'OMIDIRE, F, Tunde B, Alao A, Onwumah T.  2009.  Ensino e divulgação da história e da cultura da África e da Diáspora Africana . , Lagos: Centre for Black and African Arts and Civilization (CBAAC)
Jaiyeola, TG.  2009.  A Study of New Concepts in Smarandache Quasigroups and Loops. , Ann Arbor: ProQuest Information & Learning
Ogunfolakan, A, Ogundiran A, Oshineye BK, Steyn G, Géloin CG, Mande CI, Martineau J-L, Amutabi CMN, Owino PM, Ojo CO, others.  2009.  Movements, borders, and identities in Africa. 40: University Rochester Press Abstract
n/a
Folaranmi, S.  2009.  {Unity {&} Identity in Diversity}. , Vechta: University of Vechta, Germany Abstract
n/a
Adedigba, M, Ogunbodede E, O Jeboda S, Naidoo S.  2008.  Self-Perceived And Unmet General Health Need Among Plwha In Nigeria, 2008/12/01. East African journal of public health. 5:199-204. Abstract

This study set out to determine the self-reported unmet health needs of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in a Nigerian population.A prospective study conducted among consecutive 209 consenting PLWHA in the South-western Nigeria; who sought for care in the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals complex, Ile-Ife and General Hospital, Ilesa were recruited. Participants completed a comprehensive survey seeking information to determine their unmet needs in the following areas: Medication, Dental, Mental, Home care, Hospital admission, access to antiretroviral therapy and emergency services.
One or more unmet needs were reported by 79.4% of the sample. Needs for medication, home-based care and mental care were more likely to be unmet. There was a statistically significant relationship between unmet needs and living arrangements (p < 0.05).
Perceived oral health status was the factor that best predicted the unmet need. Perceived oral health status of these patients should be improved to reduce the level of the unmet needs.

Adedigba, M, Ogunbodede E, O Jeboda S, Naidoo S.  2008.  Self-Perceived And Unmet General Health Need Among Plwha In Nigeria, 2008/12/01. East African journal of public health. 5:199-204. Abstract

This study set out to determine the self-reported unmet health needs of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in a Nigerian population.A prospective study conducted among consecutive 209 consenting PLWHA in the South-western Nigeria; who sought for care in the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals complex, Ile-Ife and General Hospital, Ilesa were recruited. Participants completed a comprehensive survey seeking information to determine their unmet needs in the following areas: Medication, Dental, Mental, Home care, Hospital admission, access to antiretroviral therapy and emergency services.
One or more unmet needs were reported by 79.4% of the sample. Needs for medication, home-based care and mental care were more likely to be unmet. There was a statistically significant relationship between unmet needs and living arrangements (p < 0.05).
Perceived oral health status was the factor that best predicted the unmet need. Perceived oral health status of these patients should be improved to reduce the level of the unmet needs.

Adedigba, M, Ojo OO, Ogunbodede E, Naidoo S.  2008.  Demographic variations in the coping ability of people living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria: implications for counseling, 2008/11/13. Nigerian Dental Journal. 16 Abstract

Objective: To determine the coping ability of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) across demographic variations of gender, duration of living with HIV infection, marital status and living arrangements either with the family or alone.Method: The research design adopted in this study was descriptive survey. The population consisted of all PLWHA in Nigeria. The sample comprised of 117 PLWHA attending clinic regularly at General Hospital Ilesa, Osun State, Nigeria. The subjects had all been exposed to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT). Only those who consented participated in the study. A structured questionnaire developed for the purpose of this research was used to collect data.
Result: Marital status, living arrangements and gender do not significantly influence coping ability of the PLWHAs (p>0.05); however duration of living with the infection had significant influence on the coping ability of PLWHAs (p<0.05).
Conclusion: The length of period of living with HIV/AIDS had a significant effect on the coping abilities of PLWHA (p< 0.05). The results also showed no significant difference in the coping ability of PLWHA by gender, marital status and living arrangements (p=0.05). Developing adaptive coping skills to deal with stress of living with HIV/AIDS may be a particularly effective strategy for improving overall health among the study population and not just on the medical needs.

Bamise, CT, Bada TA, Bamise F, Ogunbodede E.  2008.  Dental Care Utilization and Satisfaction of Residential University Students, 2008/09/01. The Libyan journal of medicine. 3:140-3. Abstract

The objective of this study was to provide information on the level of utilization and satisfaction of residential university students with the dental services provided by the dental clinic of a teaching hospital. VOLUNTEERS AND MATERIAL: A stratified sampling technique was used to recruit volunteers from the outpatient clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Information was collected by a self-administered questionnaire composed of questions that measure the level of utilization and satisfaction with the dental services provided. Questionnaires were provided to 650 randomly chosen students residing in the University hostels. There were 39 refusals, and 6 incomplete questionnaires were discarded. This left a sample size of 605 volunteers.Forty seven students (7.8%) indicated that they visited the dental hospital within the last 12 months. Males and females utilized the dental services equally, and utilization increased with age and the number of years spent on campus. Anticipation of painful dental treatment, high dental charges, long waiting times and being too busy for a dental visit were cited as the most important impediments to seeking dental treatment. Females expressed greater satisfaction with the services.
Dental service utilization among the students was found to be low. Oral health awareness campaigns, improving the quality of the services, and shortening the waiting time are expected to increase service utilization and satisfaction.

Bamise, CT, Bada TA, Bamise F, Ogunbodede E.  2008.  Dental Care Utilization and Satisfaction of Residential University Students, 2008/09/01. The Libyan journal of medicine. 3:140-3. Abstract

The objective of this study was to provide information on the level of utilization and satisfaction of residential university students with the dental services provided by the dental clinic of a teaching hospital. VOLUNTEERS AND MATERIAL: A stratified sampling technique was used to recruit volunteers from the outpatient clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Information was collected by a self-administered questionnaire composed of questions that measure the level of utilization and satisfaction with the dental services provided. Questionnaires were provided to 650 randomly chosen students residing in the University hostels. There were 39 refusals, and 6 incomplete questionnaires were discarded. This left a sample size of 605 volunteers.Forty seven students (7.8%) indicated that they visited the dental hospital within the last 12 months. Males and females utilized the dental services equally, and utilization increased with age and the number of years spent on campus. Anticipation of painful dental treatment, high dental charges, long waiting times and being too busy for a dental visit were cited as the most important impediments to seeking dental treatment. Females expressed greater satisfaction with the services.
Dental service utilization among the students was found to be low. Oral health awareness campaigns, improving the quality of the services, and shortening the waiting time are expected to increase service utilization and satisfaction.

Adedigba, M, Ogunbodede E, O Jeboda S, Naidoo S.  2008.  Patterns of oral manifestation of HIV/AIDS among 225 Nigerian patients, 2008/06/01. Oral diseases. 14:341-6. Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS and to correlate the prevalence of these lesions with the stages of the disease in the Ife-Ijesa zone, Nigeria. No comprehensive data were available for correlating it with the staging of HIV/AIDS in this region.The pattern of oral HIV lesions as classified by the EC-Clearinghouse was studied in 225 confirmed consecutive HIV-infected patients in this zone.
Clinical dental examinations were conducted under natural daylight on all consenting HIV patients, sitting in an upright chair, using dental mirrors and probes.
The prevalence of oral HIV lesions was 84.0%, with lesions ranging in number from one to six. The commonest HIV lesion was pseudo-membranous candidiasis (43.1%) followed by erythematous candidiasis (28.9%), angular cheilitis (28.9%), linear gingival erythema (24.0%) and ulcerations (8.9%). Lesions less commonly found were oral hairy leukoplakia (1.3%) and salivary gland swellings (1.3%). Heterosexual intercourse was the most common mode of transmission (94.7%) and HIV-1 (96.9%) the most prevalent pathogen among the study population. The majority of the patients were in the WHO clinical stage III (59.1%) and presented late.
The prevalence of oral HIV lesions in the present study was high.

De Vries(nci, J, Murtomaa H, Butler(com M, Cherrett(nci H, Ferrillo(nci P, Ferro M, Gadbury-Amyot C, Haden K, Manogue M, Mintz J, E. Mulvihill(nci J, Murray(nci B, Nattestad A, Nielsen(nci D, Ogunbodede E, Parkash H, Plasschaert(nci F, T. Reed(nci M, L. Rupp(com R, Shanley(nci D.  2008.  The Global Network on Dental Education: a new vision for IFDEA, 2008/02/15. European Journal of Dental Education. 12:167-175. Abstract

The advent of globalization has changed our perspectives radically. It presents increased understanding of world affairs, new challenges and exciting opportunities. The inequitable distribution and use of finite energy resources and global warming are just two examples of challenges that can only be addressed by concerted international collaboration. Globalization has become an increasingly important influence on dentistry and dental education. The International Federation for Dental Educators and Associations (IFDEA) welcomes the challenges it now faces as a player in a complex multifaceted global community. This report addresses the new circumstances in which IFDEA must operate, taking account of the recommendations made by other working groups. The report reviews the background and evolution of IFDEA and describes the extensive developments that have taken place in IFDEA over the past year with the introductions of a new Constitution and Bylaws overseen by a newly established Board of Directors. These were the consequence of a new mission, goals and objectives for IFDEA. An expanded organization is planned using http://www.IFDEA.org as the primary instrument to facilitate the exchange of knowledge, programmes and expertise between colleagues and federated associations throughout the world, thereby promoting higher standards in oral health through education in low-, middle- and high-income countries of the world. Such aspirations are modified by the reality and enormity of poverty-related global ill health.

Ojofeitimi, E, Adedigba M, Ogunbodede E, R Fajemilehin B, Adegbehingbe B.  2008.  Oral health and the elderly in Nigeria: a case for oral health promotion, 2008/01/01. Gerodontology. 24:231-4. Abstract

To determine the prevalence of problems associated with chewing and the relationship with body mass index, the self-reported rating of oral health and normative oral hygiene assessment among the elderly.This was a descriptive community based study carried out in three locations in Ife-Ijesa zone (south western Nigeria). Elderly persons of 55 years and above were recruited through the religious organisations. All elderly who volunteered were assisted in completing a questionnaire on their socio-demographic status, chewing ability, any quadrant associated with problems and self-rating of oral health. An oral examination under a natural daylight using sterile wooden spatulae and an upright chair was carried out. The Oral Hygiene Index of Greene and Vermillion [Journal of the American Dental Association (1964) 61, p. 172] was used to determine the oral hygiene status.
The lower right quadrant had the highest frequency of complaint on difficulty with chewing (15.6%), and 44.1% of the subjects had problems with chewing. Twenty-nine per cent rated their oral health as poor or very poor. There was a statistically significant association between the rating of oral health and the presence of calculus (p = 0.022). This was also true for oral hygiene and having any problem with chewing (p = 0.001). The self-rating of oral health was not in agreement with that of the normative finding.
Health promotion focusing on the oral health of the elderly is a significant requirement for the study population. Proper evaluation of the effectiveness of traditional dentifrices must be carried out and interventions designed to address the possibility of improper usage.

Kadiri, DS.  2008.  Fundamentals of Quantity Surveying. , Lagos: Matson Compugrafik Company
Salami, A. T., Ofoezie, I. E., and Awotoye OO.  2008.  Towards a Low Carbon Economy,. : Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Institute of Ecology and Environmental Studies, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
Adedigba, M, Ogunbodede E, O Jeboda S, Naidoo S.  2007.  Oral health treatment needs of HIV/AIDS patients in Ife-Ijesa zone, Nigeria, 2007/09/20. Tanzania Dental Journal. 14 Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the oral health status and needs of people living with HIV/AIDS(PLWHA) in Ife-Ijesa zone, Nigeria. Materials and methods: An anonymous, administered questionnaire survey
among 209 PLWHA who provided informed, written consent was conducted. Information on socio-demographics,
perceived oral health status and professional care obtained. Clinical oral examinations were conducted using a dental
explorer and mirror in natural daylight. The oral examinations were carried out to determine, presence of oral HIV
lesions, normative needs-oral hygiene and periodontal status, restorative and surgical needs. Results: There was a
statistically significant relationship between the presence of an oral HIV lesion and perceived oral health status.
Patients that reported the need for oral health care are more than those of medical needs (p<0.05). The oral health
needs increased as the clinical stage of the disease advanced (p<0.05). There was poor oral health status among the
PLWHA and their needs were routine. Conclusions: The oral health status of the examined PLWHAs was poor. The
normative and the perceived oral health evaluation were not in agreement in this study. The normative oral health
care needs of PLWHAs are not complex and hence district oral health care centres should be equipped to meet these
needs.

K. Hammed, M, Adedigba M, Ogunbodede E.  2007.  The role of secondary school teachers in HIV prevention in Nigeria, 2007/07/31. Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies. August 2007; Vol. 2:173-179. Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate knowledge about HIV/AIDS among classroom secondary school teachers and document any efforts at educating their pupils about HIV prevention. A self-administered questionnaire addressed issues on demography, knowledge and awareness on HIV/AIDS and their roles in HIV/AIDS prevention. All consenting school teachers in the Irewole local government area of Osun State, Nigeria, participated in this study. The response rate was 91.7% (n = 180). There were more males (76.4%) than females (23.0%) The mean (± SD) age of the respondents was 41.5 (±15.5) years. More than 90% had adequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS and indicated that it could be prevented. Furthermore, 86.1% wanted HIV/AIDS preventive education to be made compulsory in the secondary school curriculum. There were 131 (n = 165, 79.4%) teachers who did not teach HIV/AIDS prevention, while 32 (19.4%) teachers believed that the pupils were too young and that the non-availability of guidelines and resources are reasons for not teaching it. One hundred and fifty-three (92.7%) of the respondents would like to attend a course/programme/workshop to update their knowledge and 139 (84.2%) of teachers would like to be part of an HIV/ AIDS prevention group for their community. There is a need for school teachers to be trained adequately and provided with a structured educational programme to follow in order to enhance effectiveness in HIV/ AIDS preventive education to pupils.

Rudolph, M, Ogunbodede E, Mistry M.  2007.  Management of the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS by traditional healers and care givers, 2007/04/01. Curationis. 30:56-61. Abstract

In many communities of South Africa, traditional healers are often the only means of health care delivery available. The level of knowledge and ability to recognize oral lesions of 32 traditional healers and 17 care-givers were assessed after a two-day workshop. The data collection instrument was a structured questionnaire, complimented by enlarged clinical photographs of the common oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. Prior to the workshop, 46 (93.9%) of the 49 respondents had never had any formal information on oral health and 43 (87.8%) were unfamiliar with the symptoms of oral diseases. Thirty-five (71.4%) recognized bleeding gums from A4-size photographs and 11 (22.4%) recognized oral thrush. The recognition of other oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS were; oral hairy leukoplakia (41.0%), angular cheilitis (43.6%), herpes virus infection (56.4%), oral ulcerations (56.8%), and in children, parotid enlargement (27.3%), and moluscum contagiosum (56.8%). Traditional healers and caregivers constitute an untapped resource with enormous potential. A positive bridge should be built to link traditional healing with modem medicine in the struggle against HIV/AIDS.

Rudolph, M, Ogunbodede E, Mistry M.  2007.  Management of the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS by traditional healers and care givers, 2007/04/01. Curationis. 30:56-61. Abstract

In many communities of South Africa, traditional healers are often the only means of health care delivery available. The level of knowledge and ability to recognize oral lesions of 32 traditional healers and 17 care-givers were assessed after a two-day workshop. The data collection instrument was a structured questionnaire, complimented by enlarged clinical photographs of the common oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. Prior to the workshop, 46 (93.9%) of the 49 respondents had never had any formal information on oral health and 43 (87.8%) were unfamiliar with the symptoms of oral diseases. Thirty-five (71.4%) recognized bleeding gums from A4-size photographs and 11 (22.4%) recognized oral thrush. The recognition of other oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS were; oral hairy leukoplakia (41.0%), angular cheilitis (43.6%), herpes virus infection (56.4%), oral ulcerations (56.8%), and in children, parotid enlargement (27.3%), and moluscum contagiosum (56.8%). Traditional healers and caregivers constitute an untapped resource with enormous potential. A positive bridge should be built to link traditional healing with modem medicine in the struggle against HIV/AIDS.

Bamise, CT, Ogunbodede E, Olusile A, Esan T.  2007.  Erosive Potential of Soft Drinks in Nigeria, 2007/01/01. World J Med Sci. 2 Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the erosive potential of some soft drinks commonly consumed in Nigeria. A range of popular carbonated drinks (cola and non-cola) and fruit juices were selected. On two occasions, the followings were determined; (1) the pH, measured by a digital pH meter on opening of th e packaging can or bottle. (2) The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to raise the pH of 50 ml of the drinks to pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. The pH before titration ranges from 2.70 to 4.48 for the carbonated drinks and 3.54-3.91 for the fruit juices. The soft drinks and the fruit juices investigated had pH before titration lower than the critical pH 5.5 for enamel dissolution. The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to bring the drinks to pH 5.5 ranged from 0.5 to 6.1mls and 1.8 to 8.2 mls of the base needed to neutralize the drinks to pH 7.0. The fruit juices needed the most base to neutralize its acidity. Despite having a lower pH than the fruit drinks, the carbonated drinks required a relatively lower base to neutralize. This study concludes that all the popular soft drinks in Nigeria selected for this study had significant erosive potential. They had pH below the critical pH of enamel dissolution. The erosive potential of the fruit juices was more than the carbonated cola and non-cola drinks. This information will be of use to clinicians when counseling patients with tooth surface loss.

Bamise, CT, Ogunbodede E, Olusile A, Esan T.  2007.  Erosive Potential of Soft Drinks in Nigeria, 2007/01/01. World J Med Sci. 2 Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the erosive potential of some soft drinks commonly consumed in Nigeria. A range of popular carbonated drinks (cola and non-cola) and fruit juices were selected. On two occasions, the followings were determined; (1) the pH, measured by a digital pH meter on opening of th e packaging can or bottle. (2) The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to raise the pH of 50 ml of the drinks to pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. The pH before titration ranges from 2.70 to 4.48 for the carbonated drinks and 3.54-3.91 for the fruit juices. The soft drinks and the fruit juices investigated had pH before titration lower than the critical pH 5.5 for enamel dissolution. The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to bring the drinks to pH 5.5 ranged from 0.5 to 6.1mls and 1.8 to 8.2 mls of the base needed to neutralize the drinks to pH 7.0. The fruit juices needed the most base to neutralize its acidity. Despite having a lower pH than the fruit drinks, the carbonated drinks required a relatively lower base to neutralize. This study concludes that all the popular soft drinks in Nigeria selected for this study had significant erosive potential. They had pH below the critical pH of enamel dissolution. The erosive potential of the fruit juices was more than the carbonated cola and non-cola drinks. This information will be of use to clinicians when counseling patients with tooth surface loss.

Ogunlade, D.  2007.  African Paradise. , Ile-Ife: Andkolad Publishers
Ogunlade, O.  2007.  The Scientific Concept of Insatiability and Corruption. , Ile-Ife: Andkolad Publishers