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Folayan, M, Orenuga O, Bankole O, Oziegbe E, Denloye O, Oredugba F.  2013.  1000 Multiple Response Questions in Paediatric Dentistry. , 400 Ser Avenue, Suite 1600, Hauppauge, NY, 11788.: Nova Science Publishers Inc
Caleb, M.  2013.  CV. View My CV
Mejiuni, O.  2013.  Women and Power: Education, Religion and Identity. Abstract

Education is an important tool for the development of human potential. Organizations and individuals interested in development consider knowledge, skills and attitudes, obtained through formal, non-formal and incidental learning, as invaluable assets. Therefore, it is necessary to reflect on fundamental elements that shape the process through which education is attained: How do people learn, and what are the conditions that facilitate effective learning? Answers to these questions demonstrate that no education can be politically neutral, because there is no value-free education.

The traditional or indigenous education systems in Nigeria, which covered (and still cover) physical training, development of character, respect for elders and peers, development of intellectual skills, specific vocational trainings, developing a sense of belonging and participation in community affairs, and understanding, appreciating and promoting the cultural heritage of the community were, and are, not value-free. In other words, the goals and purpose of education, the content, the entire process and the procedures chosen for evaluation in education are all value-laden.

This book attempts to show that the teaching-learning process in higher education, and religion, taught and learned through non-formal and informal education (or the hidden curriculum), and other socialization processes within and outside the formal school system, all interface to determine the persons that women become. This education enhances or limits women’s capabilities, whether in the civic-political sphere or in their attempts to resist violence. Hence, education and religion have ways of empowering or disempowering women.

Ogunbodede, E, ANIZOBA E.  2012.  The Growth of Dental Training Institutions in Post-Independence Nigeria, 2012/06/21. Abstract

Objective: Nigeria with the current population estimated at 160 million is the most populous black-country in the world. One fifth of every African is a Nigerian. Although modern dentistry had been practiced in the country since 1907, the first dental school was not established until 1966. Apart from Dental Surgeons and Dental Technologists, all other cadre of oral health personnel are trained outside the university. The main objective of the present study is to assess the growth of these dental training institutions over 50 years, from 1960 when Nigeria attained independence to 2010.Method: A desk review of publications of the National Universities Commission, Faculties of Dentistry, and other relevant institutions was conducted. These were complimented with related Journal articles, and publications of the professional registration bodies.
Result: There were nine universities with dental programmes in Nigeria, all of which are fully funded by government. The first of these was established in 1966. Over the 50 years Institutions training Dentists had increased to eight. There were two institutions training Dental Technologists, one of which is a university. Dental Nurses/Technicians were trained in Schools of Health Technology and these had increased in line with creation of new states in the country. Political considerations rather than strategic plans played significant roles in the establishment and growth of these training institutions.
Conclusion: These findings have serious policy implications. Specific plans need to be in place for the establishment of training institutions and the development of oral health workforce in the country.

Bamire, AS, Abaidoo R, Jemo M, Abdoulaye T, Yusuf A, Nwoke OC.  2012.  Profitability analysis of commercial chemical and biological crop products among farm households in agro-ecological zones of West Africa, 2012/06/19. 7:3385-3394. Abstract

This paper evaluates the costs and returns incurred by the use of chemical and biological crop products among households in five selected Compro communities in the derived, Southern Guinea, Northern Guinea, Sudan and Sahel Savanna agro-ecological zones (AEZs) in West Africa. Sixty households were randomly selected in each of the communities to give a total of 300 households. Data were collected on the characteristics of the chemical products, households' socio-economic variables such as age and education, as well as, on farm input and output quantities and prices in the 2009/2010 periods using a pre-tested questionnaire. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and budgetary techniques. The Results obtained show a male dominant, fairly literate farming household, with small landholdings (comprising mainly cereal and legume fields) that are predominantly inherited and located far away from the homestead. Inorganic fertilizers, organic manure, improved seeds and pesticides are known as commercial inputs/ products used on farmers' fields, while agrolizer, apron plus and boost extra are the emerging products. The average quantity of inputs applied varied across the zones. The total quantity of inorganic fertilizer applied on the fields was highest in the NGS (924 kg) and lowest in the Sudan (676 kg). However, fertilizer application per hectare by respondents was below recommended dosages across the zones. The emerging chemical inputs (Agrolizer, Boost Extra and Apron Plus) were used only in Compro communities in the derived savanna (DS) and southern guinea savanna (SGS) by a small number of households. The results obtained from budgetary analysis show that gross margin per hectare was highest in the SGS ($ 254) where the emerging inputs were used by 41.7% of the households and lowest in the Sahel ($ 76). Organic fertilizer was used only in small quantities in the AEZs. Total variable costs accounted for more than 30% of revenue generated, and labour and fertilizer accounted for the highest percentage of these costs. The study concludes that promoting the emerging chemical inputs through increased accessibility and farmers' training on their appropriate agronomic use would increase farmers' income generating potentials for sustainable crop production across the AEZs.

Muse, WA.  2012.  Inaugural Lecture: Essence of Insect Promiscuity. , Ile-Ife: Obafemi Awolowo University Press Limited
Idowu, AA.  2012.  "Sovereighty and External Interventions: The Crisis in Cote d' Ivoire".. , Germany, 51 pages: LAP, Lambert Academic Publishing, 66121 Saarbrucken,
Folaranmi, S, Ajiboye O.  2012.  {Man with Nature III}. 3, Ile-Ife: Department of Fine and Applied Arts, OAU Ife Abstract
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A, O, Folayan M, T O, Harris G, Ogunbodede E.  2011.  Health workers perception of hospital’s institutional structure, 2011/01/01. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 1:79-88. Abstract
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A, O, Folayan M, T O, Harris G, Ogunbodede E.  2011.  Health workers perception of hospital’s institutional structure, 2011/01/01. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 1:79-88. Abstract
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Nwhator, S, Ogunbodede E, Adedigba M, Sagay E.  2010.  Prognostic Indicators of Gingival Recession in Nigeria: Preliminary Findings, 2010/06/01. TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin. 9 Abstract

AIM: Literature is replete with studies on gingival recession, the apical shift of the gingival margin from the cemento-enamel junction. Chronic periodontitis and frequent toothbrushing are among its aetiological factors. Many of these were however prevalence studies. The current study was therefore aimed at separating prognostic indicators from determinants of the number of recessions. METHOD: 650 consecutive adult patients visiting a Nigerian teaching hospital were examined using a checklist including plaque, calculus, Miller’s class of recession and other parameters.. A total of 408 recession sites were identified. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with recession was 42.3 years; mean number of recession was 4.74 Incisors had the highest number of recessions (35.7%). While a factor such as age was related both to the number and prognosis of recession sites, abrasion and plaque were only related to prognosis. Again, some of the factors previously significantly related to prognosis on univariate analysis like calculus and smoking, lost their significance on regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The three strongest predictors of prognosis (Miller’s class) of recession were age, plaque and abrasion. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(3): 187-194]

Nwhator, S, Ogunbodede E, Adedigba M, Sagay E.  2010.  Prognostic Indicators of Gingival Recession in Nigeria: Preliminary Findings, 2010/06/01. TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin. 9 Abstract

AIM: Literature is replete with studies on gingival recession, the apical shift of the gingival margin from the cemento-enamel junction. Chronic periodontitis and frequent toothbrushing are among its aetiological factors. Many of these were however prevalence studies. The current study was therefore aimed at separating prognostic indicators from determinants of the number of recessions. METHOD: 650 consecutive adult patients visiting a Nigerian teaching hospital were examined using a checklist including plaque, calculus, Miller’s class of recession and other parameters.. A total of 408 recession sites were identified. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with recession was 42.3 years; mean number of recession was 4.74 Incisors had the highest number of recessions (35.7%). While a factor such as age was related both to the number and prognosis of recession sites, abrasion and plaque were only related to prognosis. Again, some of the factors previously significantly related to prognosis on univariate analysis like calculus and smoking, lost their significance on regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The three strongest predictors of prognosis (Miller’s class) of recession were age, plaque and abrasion. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(3): 187-194]

Adeniyi, A, Ogunbodede E, Jeboda Sonny O, Sofola O.  2010.  Dental caries occurrence and associated oral hygiene practices among rural and urban Nigerian pre-school children, 2010/01/01. Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene. 1:64-70. Abstract

The objective of this research is to assess the prevalence of dental caries in Nigerian preschool children and establish the proportion of treated lesions and to also investigate the association between oral hygiene habits and dental caries prevalence in the study population. Dental examinations were performed on 404 children aged between 18 months and 5 years and an interview were conducted for the mothers to obtain information about the child and her/his household. The children were recruited from primary health centres where pre-school children are routinely immunized in Lagos State. The prevalence of dental caries in the study population was 10.9%. A significantly higher caries occurrence was observed in children older than 3 years than in those less than 3 years of age (p < 0.001). Caries prevalence was not significantly associated with who supervises the child's tooth-brushing (p = 0.106), type of toothpaste used (p = 0.657) and frequency of tooth brushing (p = 0.774). Oral hygiene score was positively correlated with caries prevalence and the relationship was statistically significant (p < 0.000). While the prevalence of caries in the study was low, the child's age and oral hygiene score were observed to influence the occurrence of caries in the study population.

Adeniyi, A, Ogunbodede E, Jeboda Sonny O, Sofola O.  2010.  Dental caries occurrence and associated oral hygiene practices among rural and urban Nigerian pre-school children, 2010/01/01. Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene. 1:64-70. Abstract

The objective of this research is to assess the prevalence of dental caries in Nigerian preschool children and establish the proportion of treated lesions and to also investigate the association between oral hygiene habits and dental caries prevalence in the study population. Dental examinations were performed on 404 children aged between 18 months and 5 years and an interview were conducted for the mothers to obtain information about the child and her/his household. The children were recruited from primary health centres where pre-school children are routinely immunized in Lagos State. The prevalence of dental caries in the study population was 10.9%. A significantly higher caries occurrence was observed in children older than 3 years than in those less than 3 years of age (p < 0.001). Caries prevalence was not significantly associated with who supervises the child's tooth-brushing (p = 0.106), type of toothpaste used (p = 0.657) and frequency of tooth brushing (p = 0.774). Oral hygiene score was positively correlated with caries prevalence and the relationship was statistically significant (p < 0.000). While the prevalence of caries in the study was low, the child's age and oral hygiene score were observed to influence the occurrence of caries in the study population.

ADESOLA, F.  2010.   National Security in Nigeria’s Relations with its Neighbours. , Saarbrucken (Germany): VDM Verlag Dr. Muller GmbH & Co. KG.
Akindele, S, Adeyemi O.  2010.  Corruption and the Nigerian State: A Critical Discourse. , Saarbrucken, Germany.: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing:
Alao, KA, Kobiowu SV, Adebowale OF.  2010.  Fundamentals of Educational and Counselling Psychology.. , UK: Strategic Insight Publishing. ISBN-10: 1908064048, ISBN-13: 9781908064042
Adeniyi, A, Ogunbodede E, Sonny Jeboda O, Folayan M.  2009.  Do maternal factors influence the dental health status of Nigerian pre-school children?, 2009/10/01 International journal of paediatric dentistry / the British Paedodontic Society [and] the International Association of Dentistry for Children. 19:448-54. Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the relationship between maternal related factors and the dental health status of pre-school children in Lagos State, Nigeria.A cross-sectional study of 404 pairs of mothers and their pre-school children was conducted at two selected primary health centres in Lagos State Nigeria. An interviewer administered questionnaire recorded the mother's socio-demographic characteristics and assessed her perception of her child's dental needs, attitude to oral disease prevention, level of dental health knowledge and attitude to oral health. The child's dental status was assessed using the dft index (caries status) and the simplified oral hygiene index. Data analysis tools included Spearman's correlation coefficient and multivariate logistic regression.
Maternal age, maternal education, location of residence, maternal knowledge, and attitudes were all positively correlated with the child's caries and oral hygiene status. There were statistically significant correlations between maternal attitude and the oral hygiene index (P = 0.01) and dft score (P = 0.001). Maternal age also had a significant relationship with the child's caries status (P = 0.003).
This study concluded that maternal age and attitude were important determinants of caries experience whereas the mother's attitude was an important determinant of oral cleanliness in pre-school children in Lagos State Nigeria.

Uti, O, Agbelusi G, Olukayode Jeboda S, Ogunbodede E.  2009.  Infection control knowledge and practices related to HIV among Nigerian dentists, 2009/09/01. Journal of infection in developing countries. 3:604-10. Abstract

Many diseases including HIV/AIDS can be transmitted in the dental setting when effective infection control procedures are ignored. The aim of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the infection control knowledge and practices of Nigerian dentists in the era of HIV/AIDS.Information on knowledge of transmission of HIV, occupational vulnerability, infection control practices, and opinion on adequacy of infection control facilities were gathered from dentists through a self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge was assessed on a total score of 20 questions.
Only 3.6% of the dentists had poor knowledge. Younger males and dentists working in teaching hospitals had significantly better knowledge than their counterparts. While 40.8% believed HIV could be transmitted through saliva, only 43.2% knew it could be transmitted through the conjunctiva. Most (93.2%) wore gloves routinely and the most common barrier to glove use was non-availability. Most (79.2%) used autoclaves for sterilization; however, chemical disinfectants and boiling were also used. The majority (72.4%) believed the facilities for infection control in their centres were inadequate. Close to half of the respondents (47.6%; n = 118) rated the occupational risk of becoming infected with HIV as high.
The results of this study have shown that while the level of knowledge of the dentists was generally acceptable, there were still some misconceptions on the transmission and occupational vulnerability of HIV. It also indicates only partial compliance with recommended infection control procedures among Nigerian dentists as a result of inadequate supplies.