Publications

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Book Chapter
Agunbiade, OM, Akinyemi AI.  2017.  Neoliberalism and Resilience Among Older Yoruba People in a Semiurban Community, South West Nigeria. Cross-Cultural and Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Social Gerontology. :85-107.: Springer Abstract
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Abereijo, IO, Afolabi JF.  2017.  Religiosity and entrepreneurship intentions among Pentecostal Christians. Entrepreneurship: concepts, methodologies, tools, and applications. :1865–1880.: IGI Global Abstract
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Afolabi, JF, Abereijo IO.  2017.  Returnee Entrepreneurship and Occupational Health and Safety in Nigeria. Diasporas and Transnational Entrepreneurship in Global Contexts. :90–101.: IGI Global Abstract
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Asojo, AO, Jaiyeoba B.  2017.  Settlement Pattern. Culture and Customs of the Yoruba. :259–267. Abstract
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Amole, B, Folaranmi S.  2017.  {Architecture: Indigenous}. Culture and Customs of the Yoruba. (Falola, Toyin, Akinyemi, Akintunde, Eds.).:171–189., Austin, Texas: Pan-African University Press Abstract

Introduction The Yorùbá people of South-Western Nigeria and the Republic of Benin, (see fig. 1. Extent of area covered by the Yoruba in West Africa) together with many countless descendants in other parts of Africa, the Americas and beyond have made remarkable contributions to world civilisation in many ways. In the arts, they possess one of the oldest and finest traditions in Africa, a tradition that still remains vital and influential today. The Yorùbá are well known especially for their wooden sculptures which are mainly used as door panels, veranda posts, pillars, and stools in their buildings. They also carve thousands of figurative sculptures which are either used for religious or utilitarian purposes. Aside from their art in wood, they are excellent workers of metal, casters of Brass and Bronze, calabash carvings, bead works, and traditional wall decoration. All these numerous creative endeavours are executed either along with, or in support of Yorùbá indigenous architecture, which is relatively permanent in structure. Therefore it is clear that our understanding of the Yorùbá people will never be complete without a full investigation of the physical environment in which the people live, work, and play. Indeed Yorùbá architecture is a rich context from which to draw a study of Yorùbá culture. The Yorùbá are known to be city dwellers, the make-up of their houses points to the fact that for thousands of years they have occupied large towns, which are different from their farm settlements called abà. The tropical regions and semi-rainforest savannah in which they are located is also highly suitable for various forms of agricultural practice and development. Thus they cultivate food crops like maize, yam, cassava, beans and vegetable materials as well as tree crops like cocoa, palm trees, cola nuts, and cashews, to mention a few. While farmers are on the farm attending to crops, the hunters are in the deep forest, hunting for wild game. The presence of several different food strategies portrays the Yorùbá as a self-sufficient group before their contact with the outside world especially Europeans. As a result, it allows them to be more stable in order to construct more permanent structures for private, public and religious purposes. The Yorùbá population, for reasons of self-defence, sheer gregariousness, or both is predominantly urban. This is unlike various other ethnic groups that surround the Yorùbá. Even the farmers have their houses in the town and look upon their farms, which are in many cases situated at great distances from town, merely as places of work and temporary residences 3 . A typical Yorùbá village consists of a number of family compounds along with structures that serve the larger community. Each family compound may have separate structures for cooking, eating, sleeping, storing food (granary), and protecting animals at night. Structures may be round, rectangular, or semi-circular in shape. Communal structures, for holding meetings and teaching children, are located in a prominent place within the village. Known for their highly organized traditional and social groupings; the Yorùbá had a well ordered socio-political set up both at their urban and rural dwelling places long before colonization and contact with the outside world. Their houses are thus designed along this pattern especially with the compound being the focus of family life. In the past, the average Yorùbá family comprised the man, who is the head of the house or compound, his wife or wives depending on how prosperous he is, and their children. The house or compound becomes more enlarged and homogenous when his male children start getting married. These sons usually occupy another building within the same clan compound, thus

Akinbami, C, Olawoye J, Adesina F.  2016.  Rural Women Belief System and Attitude Toward Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies in Nigeria, 2016/07/29. :49-69. Abstract

Climate change has affected both the natural and human systems, of which the women in the rural areas and their livelihood practices are the mostly affected. This study was conducted in some selected rural communities of Osun state in Southwest, Nigeria among women involved in different livelihood practices to find out issues about climate change impacts on the rural women such as: Are the rural women aware of climate change and its impacts? How prepared are they for climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies? Are there any socio-cultural barriers to combating climate change? The study therefore focused attention on their beliefs, attitude and perception about climate change. It also discussed the barriers their beliefs and attitude posed to the establishment and implementation of mitigation and adaptation strategies in the rural areas. Focus Group Discussions, in-depth interview and questionnaire were employed to capture awareness, actual beliefs and attitude, the effect of such attitude and beliefs on adopting mitigation and adaptation strategies. Data collected were analysed using Atlas.ti and SPSS. Most of the women in the rural areas are aware of the impacts of climate change in their environment, especially, on their livelihoods. However, the awareness level has not impacted on them positively to adopt any mitigation and adaptation strategies. This is due to their belief system that climate change is not a consequence of anthropogenic activities. Recommendations were made as to how these problems could be solved for the women in the rural areas to embrace mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Ologeh, I, Akarakiri J, Adesina F.  2016.  Promoting Climate Smart Agriculture Through Space Technology in Nigeria, 2016/01/17. :99-112. Abstract

Agriculture is one of the sectors mostly affected by climate change. Nigerian farmers have been losing their harvests to the impacts of climate change leading to lower crop production and poorer livelihoods. Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) is an adaptation strategy that helps rural farmers to be resilient to and cope with the effects of climate change. It can be improved through the use of space technology by empowering key actors, providing them with reliable weather forecasts at the right time.This paper presents an assessment of already adopted space applications in Nigerian agricultural sector; the distribution of mobile phones to rural farmers by government for easy access to CSA information from extension workers. It is also a policy research on other unpractised space applications, especially the conversion of geo-data to relevant information on climate and hazards that can help local farmers, nourishing them with timely agricultural advice which enables them to have higher crop yields and a more efficient use of seeds, water and fertilizers. The farmers will also receive early warnings for drought, flooding and/or diseases on their mobile phones, thus maximizing its use. The results of this paper will be useful for crop production agencies and NGOs in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Ologeh, I, Akarakiri J, Adesina F.  2016.  Promoting Climate Smart Agriculture Through Space Technology in Nigeria, 2016/01/17. :99-112. Abstract

Agriculture is one of the sectors mostly affected by climate change. Nigerian farmers have been losing their harvests to the impacts of climate change leading to lower crop production and poorer livelihoods. Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) is an adaptation strategy that helps rural farmers to be resilient to and cope with the effects of climate change. It can be improved through the use of space technology by empowering key actors, providing them with reliable weather forecasts at the right time.This paper presents an assessment of already adopted space applications in Nigerian agricultural sector; the distribution of mobile phones to rural farmers by government for easy access to CSA information from extension workers. It is also a policy research on other unpractised space applications, especially the conversion of geo-data to relevant information on climate and hazards that can help local farmers, nourishing them with timely agricultural advice which enables them to have higher crop yields and a more efficient use of seeds, water and fertilizers. The farmers will also receive early warnings for drought, flooding and/or diseases on their mobile phones, thus maximizing its use. The results of this paper will be useful for crop production agencies and NGOs in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Ademuleya, BA.  2016.  Body Adornment and Cosmetics. Encyclopedia of the Yoruba. , Bloomington: Indiana University Press Abstract

The paper is an overview of the Yoruba custumal practice of adorn their bodies using a variety of means. The paper classified body adornment into three, namely; body marking, dressing and accessories, and cosmetics. It identifies the differences in the variety forms in the Yoruba adorns the body and observes that apart from adding beauty to the body, it also serves as a form of identifying the beholder by his or her lineage or town of origin. It also observed that every Yoruba sub-group could be identified by their uses of dresses, hair dressing, and use of accessories and jewelries which symbolizes the wearer’s status, his or her wealth, as well as his position within the society as well as one form of facial mark or the other. It concludes that the basic intention of having the body adorned by the Yoruba is generally for the purpose of beautification, status enhancement and Identity.

Adebisi, TA.  2016.  Commercial Motorcycling: Antidote to Unemployment or Breeding Ground of Crimes and Woe? A Case Study of South-Western Nigeria. Contemporary Nigeria Transitional Agencies of Change. , Austin Texas: Pan-African University Press
Abereijo, IO.  2016.  Ensuring Environmental Sustainability through Sustainable Entrepreneurship. Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Policy for Sustainability. , Hershey: IGI Global
Funso, ADESOLA.  2016.  The Fight for Libya: The Strength of Force, Not of Oil. Global Perspectives on US Democratization Efforts: From the Outside In. , New York (USA).: Palgrave Macmillan.
Folayan, MO, Haire B.  2016.  History, culture and social norms: implications for ebola drug and vaccine clinical trials in affected region. Ebola’s Message: Public Health and Medicine in the 21st Century . , Rogers Street in Cambridge, MA 02142: MIT Press
Salaam, NF, Usman SA, Udeagbala OL.  2016.  Insurgency, Counter-Insurgency and the Fundamental Human Rights. Leadership and Complex Military Operations (Osakwe, Chukwuma C. C., ed.) . , Kaduna, Nigeria: Nigerian Defence Academy Publishers
Funso, ADESOLA, Tale O.  2016.  Islamic Jihad, Militias, and the Contemporary Nigerian State. Contemporary Nigeria: Transitional Agencies of Change.. , Austin, Texas (USA).: Pan-African University Press.
Akindipe, OT.  2016.  Libation. Encyclopedia of the Yoruba. , Bloomington: Indiana University Press
Idowu, PA.  2016.  Online Spatial HIV/AIDS Surveillance and Monitoring System for Nigeria. Improving Health Management through Clinical Decision Support Systems. , France: IGI
Abereijo, IO, Afolabi FJ.  2016.  Religiosity and Entrepreneurship Intentions among Pentecostal Christians in Nigeria: Empirical Assessment. Diasporas and Transnational Entrepreneurship in Global Contexts. , Hershey: IGI Global
Abereijo, IO, Afolabi FJ.  2016.  Returnee Entrepreneurship and Occupational Health and Safety in Nigeria. Diasporas and Transnational Entrepreneurship in Global Contexts. , Hershey: IGI Global
Akindipe, OT.  2016.  Spirit Possession. Encyclopedia of the Yoruba. , Bloomington: Indiana University Press
Ayoh'OMIDIRE, F, Akinyemi A, Toyin F.  2016.  “Diaspora: Deities (The Òrìsà)”. Encyclopedia of the Yoruba. , Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press
Ayoh'OMIDIRE, F, Akinyemi A, Falola T.  2016.  “Diaspora: Impact of Yorùbá Culture”. Encyclopedia of the Yoruba. , Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press
Ayoh'OMIDIRE, F, Akinyemi A, Falola T.  2016.  “Diaspora: Yorùbá in South America and the Caribbean". Encyclopedia of the Yoruba. , Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press
Ayoh'OMIDIRE, F, Akinyemi A, Falola T.  2016.  “Sàró and Àgùdà” . Encyclopedia of the Yoruba. , Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press
Ayoh'OMIDIRE, F, Freitas H.  2016.  “Sobre o conceito da literature-terreiro”. O arco e a arkhé: ensaios sobre literatura e cultura. , Salvador: Ogum's Toques Negros