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xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/06/10. Abstract
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xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/10/20. Abstract

Research and development (R&D) is a significant component of quality higher education. This is quite understandable and appreciable because R&D, most especially in Science and Technology (S&T), has become the most enduring and effective means of improving sustainable economic growth, development and re-enforcing competitiveness in industries in a rapidly changing world. Universities are widely regarded not only as teaching establishments but also as organisations that create new knowledge and innovation through research. Many academics are of the opinion that doing research improves their teaching (Colbeck, 1998, 2002; Gamson, 1995; Stevans and Reingold, 2000; Robertson and Bond, 2001; Wenzel, 2001; Winkler, 1992a, b; Woolcock, 1997; Zamorski, 2002; in Begum, 2006). In recent times, universities often use evidence of research excellenceto employ or promote staff. The main claim of the teachers and administrators are that research activity can and does serve as an important mode of teaching and a valuable means of learning and thus research is a strong condition for teaching.R&D is one of the main thrusts of activities of western universities. The developed nations have clearly demonstrated that one of the most potent means of achieving developmental goals is effective building of capability in Research and Development. They have also demonstrated the relevance of effective collaboration to sustainable scientific and technological advancement (Boozeman and Lee, 2003). To corroborate this, Ehikhamenor (2003) opined that scientific productivity, in the form of intellectual contributions to the advancement of S&T, is a fundamental consideration in the scientific enterprise. A crucial requirement for
productivity and development in S&T is a system of communication among scientists and the dissemination of scientific information. Productive R&D is expected to lead to new product(s) development or improvement of existing product(s), new process development or improvement of existing process, patents, copyrights and publications. Scientific publication is a sign of good quality of invention and research outputs. Patents, copyrights, and funds from companies are signs that those inventions have market potentials (Carneiro, 2000; Werner and Souder, 1997; in Numprasertchai and Igel, 2005). Tangible R&D outcomes should promote the link between academia and the industry. However, many private and public organizations in Nigeria are skeptical about R&D outcomes from the universities and in many cases the needs of these organisations are not met. These invariably have further widened the gap between universities and industries (Oyebisi et al., 1996).
Many studies on research productivity and collaborations include an underlining assumption that collaborative activities increase research productivity (Duque et al., 2005). However, there is a dearth of information on the validity of this proposition in Nigeria. Are Nigerian researchers collaborating for R&D among themselves and with others outside their institutions? What factors inhibit collaboration activities of researchers? What influence do researchers’ collaborations have on their R&D productivity? These are some of the pertinent questions addressed in this study. For the survey, 457 copies of questionnaire were randomly distributed among lecturers. 274 of these were returned and found useful (60% response rate). The field respondents were from Faculties of Agriculture (30.8%), Science (38.8%) and Engineering/Technology (30.4%). In assessing R&D productivity of researchers we adopt the partial productivity approach. Researchers’ publications were used as output and the number of years spent to produce the publications as input (in this study 5 years, (2004 – 2008)). The normal count (of output), which is the most frequently used approach, is adopted. The outcome of the study indicated a positive relationship between R&D productivity and collaboration. This is in agreement with some previous studies on the subject of research productivity and collaboration (Lee and Bozeman, 2005; Landry et al., 1996; Harman, 1999; in Rijnsoever et al., 2008, Walsh and Maloney, 2003; in Duque et. al., (2005)

Ojo, JO.  2016.  RADIOACTIVITY IN SOME FOODS AND SOILS FROM JOS TIN MINES, JOS, NIGERIA. Ife Journal of Science. 18(4):1065-1071.ojo_joshua_19.pdf
Mokobia, CE, Adebiyi FM, Akpan I, Olise FS, Tchokossa P.  2006.  Radioassay of Prominent Nigerian Fossil Fuels using Gamma and TXRF Spectroscopy. Fuel. 85(12-13):1811-1814.
Liversidge, HM, Peariasamy K, Folayan MO, Adeniyi AA, Ngom PI, Mikami Y, Shimada Y, Kuroe K, Tvete IF, Kvaa SI.  2017.  A radiographic study of the mandibular third molar root development in different ethnic groups. Journal of Forensic Odonto-Stomatology . 35(2):103-114.
Olise, FS, Owoade OK, Olaniyi HB.  2011.  Radiological Indices of Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radionuclides: A PIXE approach. Radiological Protection. 31(2):255-264.
Idowu, PA, Olateju S, Adagunodo ER.  2006.  Radiological Information System for Primary Health Centres in Nigeria. The Journal of Computer Science and It’s Application. 12(1):80-90.
Odekunle, TO.  2004.  Rainfall and the length of the growing season in Nigeria. International Journal of Climatology. Vol. 24(4):467–479..
Sartelli, M, Kluger Y, Ansaloni L, Hardcastle TC, Rello J, Watkins RR, Bassetti M, Giamarellou E, Coccolini F, Abu-Zidan FM, others.  2018.  Raising concerns about the Sepsis-3 definitions. World Journal of Emergency Surgery. 13:1–9., Number 1: BioMed Central Abstract
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Orji, EO, Olabode TO, Kuti O, Ogunniyi SO.  2009.  A randomised controlled trial of early initiation of oral feeding after cesarean section.. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. . 22(1):65-71.
Orji, EO, Olaleye AO, Loto OM, Ogunniyi SO.  2008.  A randomised controlled trial of uterine exteriorisation and non-exteriorisation at caesarean section.. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol.. 48(6):570-4.
Orji, E, Agwu F, Loto O, Olaleye O.  2008.  A randomized comparative study of prophylactic oxytocin versus ergometrine in the third stage of labor.. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. . 101(2):129-32.
K, N, Braimah RO, FJ O, SB A.  2016.  A Randomized,double-blind, clinical trial in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital.. Niger J Surg. 22(2):70-76.
Folayan, MO, Brown B, Odetoyingbo M, Harrison A.  2014.  Rape in Nigeria: a silent epidemic among adolescents with implications for HIV infection. Global Health Action . 7:25583-http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v7.25583.
Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Ogunfolakan, A, Nwokeocha C, Olayemi A, Olayiwola M, Bamigboye A, Olayungbo A, Ogiogwa J, Oyelade O, Oyebanjo O, others.  2016.  Rapid Ecological and Environmental Assessment of Osun Sacred Forest Grove, Southwestern Nigeria. Open Journal of Forestry. 6:243., Number 04: Scientific Research Publishing Abstract
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Lamikanra, A, Crowe JL, Lijek RS, Odetoyin BW, Wain J, Aboderin OA, Okeke IN.  2011.  Rapid evolution of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Nigeria is temporally associated with fluoroquinolone use. BMC infectious diseases. 11:312., Number 1: BioMed Central Abstract
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Lamikanra, A, Crowe JL, Lijek RS, Odetoyin BW, Wain J, Aboderin OA, Okeke IN.  2011.  Rapid Evolution of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant {{Escherichia}} Coli in {{Nigeria}} Is Temporally Associated with Fluoroquinolone Use, dec. BMC Infectious Diseases. 11, Number 1: {BioMed Central} Abstract

Background: Antibiotic resistance has necessitated fluoroquinolone use but little is known about the selective forces and resistance trajectory in malaria-endemic settings, where selection from the antimalarial chloroquine for fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria has been proposed. Methods: Antimicrobial resistance was studied in fecal Escherichia coli isolates in a Nigerian community. Quinolone-resistance determining regions of gyrA and parC were sequenced in nalidixic acid resistant strains and horizontally-transmitted quinolone-resistance genes were sought by PCR. Antimicrobial prescription practices were compared with antimicrobial resistance rates over a period spanning three decades. Results: Before 2005, quinolone resistance was limited to low-level nalixidic acid resistance in fewer than 4% of E. coli isolates. In 2005, the proportion of isolates demonstrating low-level quinolone resistance due to elevated efflux increased and high-level quinolone resistance and resistance to the fluoroquinolones appeared. Fluoroquinolone resistance was attributable to single nucleotide polymorphisms in quinolone target genes gyrA and/or parC. By 2009, 35 (34.5%) of isolates were quinolone non-susceptible with nine carrying gyrA and parC SNPs and six bearing identical qnrS1 alleles. The antimalarial chloroquine was heavily used throughout the entire period but E. coli with quinolone-specific resistance mechanisms were only detected in the final half decade, immediately following the introduction of the fluoroquinolone antibacterial ciprofloxacin. Conclusions: Fluoroquinolones, and not chloroquine, appear to be the selective force for fluoroquinolone-resistant fecal E. coli in this setting. Rapid evolution to resistance following fluoroquinolone introduction points the need to implement resistant containment strategies when new antibacterials are introduced into resource-poor settings with high infectious disease burdens.