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Faluyi, JO, Durosinmi MA, Salawu L, Ogbe OP, Bolarinwa RAA, Owojuyigbe T, Oyekunle AA.  2010.  H396R, F359V and E255K mutations of the Abl kinase domain in imatinib-resistant Nigerian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.. Afr J Haem Oncol.. 1:79-83., Number 3 Abstract

AIM We have observed therapy failure in some Nigerian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We therefore set out to determine the causes of imatinib resistance in these patients.METHODS From August 2003 to July 2010, we registered and commenced 266 consenting CML patients on imatinib (IM) under the Glivec International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP). We investigated the occurrence of Abl kinase domain mutations (KDM) among a cohort of these patients, with features of imatinib resistance or intolerance. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 14 patients, after informed consent was obtained for Bcr-Abl quantitative PCR assessment and Abl KDM screening. RESULTS The chimeric Bcr-Abl gene was detectable in all patients, (range of 0.18 - 141.9%), when compared with the Abl gene. Sequencing analysis was done in 12 out of the 14 patients and Abl KDM were identified in three of the 12 patients (one quarter). One mutant (H396R) is known to retain intermediate sensitivity to imatinib, while the other two (E255K and F359V) are insensitive; all are sensitive to nilotinib. Four of these patients have since been commenced on nilotinib and are responding well to therapy, while three have died of disease progression.CONCLUSION An increasing number of Nigerian CML patients on imatinib are developing resistance or intolerance to the drug, and some are due to kinase domain mutations, while others may have other yet unexplained reasons for suboptimal response. Continuous monitoring is mandatory in the care of CML patients, to aid early detection of suboptimal therapy outcomes, necessitating further molecular studies. Additionally, more work needs to be done to fully understand the mechanisms for these therapy failures in Nigerian CML patients.

Oyekunle, A, Bolarinwa R, Owojuyigbe T, Ogbe P, Salawu L, Faluyi J, Durosinmi M.  2010.  H396R, F359V and E255K mutations of the Abl kinase domain in imatinib-resistant Nigerian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia., 2010/01/01. 1:79-83. Abstract

AIM We have observed therapy failure in some Nigerian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We therefore set out to determine the causes of imatinib resistance in these patients.METHODS From August 2003 to July 2010, we registered and commenced 266 consenting CML patients on imatinib (IM) under the Glivec International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP). We investigated the occurrence of Abl kinase domain mutations (KDM) among a cohort of these patients, with features of imatinib resistance or intolerance. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 14 patients, after informed consent was obtained for Bcr-Abl quantitative PCR assessment and Abl KDM screening.
RESULTS The chimeric Bcr-Abl gene was detectable in all patients, (range of 0.18 - 141.9%), when compared with the Abl gene. Sequencing analysis was done in 12 out of the 14 patients and Abl KDM were identified in three of the 12 patients (one quarter). One mutant (H396R) is known to retain intermediate sensitivity to imatinib, while the other two (E255K and F359V) are insensitive; all are sensitive to nilotinib. Four of these patients have since been commenced on nilotinib and are responding well to therapy, while three have died of disease progression.
CONCLUSION An increasing number of Nigerian CML patients on imatinib are developing resistance or intolerance to the drug, and some are due to kinase domain mutations, while others may have other yet unexplained reasons for suboptimal response. Continuous monitoring is mandatory in the care of CML patients, to aid early detection of suboptimal therapy outcomes, necessitating further molecular studies. Additionally, more work needs to be done to fully understand the mechanisms for these therapy failures in Nigerian CML patients.

Onyejaka, NK, Kolawole KA, Folayan MO, Oziegbe EO, Chukwumah NM, Oyedele TA, Agbaje HO, Oshomoji V.  2018.  Habit breaking methods employed by mothers of children with non nutritive sucking habits resident in sub-urban Nigeria. . Indian Journal of Dental Research. 29(5):545-550.
Olanrewaju, AN, Kareem OK, Mohammed AA, Orisasona O, Ibrahim AGS, K.A. A.  2018.  Haematological and Serum Biochemical Profiles of Heterotis niloticus (Cuvier, 1829) from Lake Alau, Maiduguri, Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Fisheries and Aquaculture. 6(2):1-10.hematology_and_biochemical_profile_h_nlioticus.pdf
Oyekunle, AA, Fesogun RB, Adediran IA.  2005.  Haematological parameters in prospective nigerian blood donors rejected on account of anaemia and/or microfilaria infestation, Jan-Mar. Niger J Med. 14:45-50., Number 1 AbstractWebsite

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, prospective blood donors are screened for blood transfusion-transmissible diseases. In addition, predonation fitness requires adequate haematocrit and, in the tropics, negative screening for microfilaria that may precipitate allergy. The high prevalence of anaemia and microfilaria, though treatable, has contributed to the dearth of eligible blood donors. This study aims to characterize anaemia in prospective blood donors rejected for anaemia and find haematological effects of microfilarial infestation in prospective blood donors. METHODS: This prospective study was carried out from 1st of August to November 30th, 2002 at the blood transfusion unit of the Haematology Department of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife. All consenting prospective blood donors that were rejected for anaemia and or microfilaria infestation during the study period were studied for their age, sex and haematological profile. A randomly selected population of successful donors was similarly studied. RESULTS: Sixty rejected prospective blood donors (5.2% of the total screened)) were studied. Forty-five (75%) of them were rejected for anaemia alone, 10 (16.7%) for microfilaria alone and 5 (8.3%) for both anaemia and microfilaria. The mean ages of those rejected were 33.3(+/- 9.9) years for anaemia alone, 29.9(+/- 8.5) years for microfilaria alone and 35.4(+/- 8.3) years for those with anaemia and microfilaria combined. The mean age of the successful group was 28.9(+/- 8.5) years. Of the 60 rejected subjects, 53 were males while 7 were females. Blood film of the anaemia group revealed features suggestive of iron deficiency anaemia (hypochromic microcytic cells) in 60% of them. The white cell count (WCC) was significantly increased in the microfilarial group compared to others and it revealed lymphocytosis and eosinophilia. CONCLUSION: The importance of these findings have been discussed in line with the existing literature. The need for intensive health education to encourage voluntary donation and promote the interest of females in blood donation is emphasized.

Adeoye, AA, Udoh JE, Rotimi EA, Ikeobi CON, Adebambo OA.  2015.  HAEMATOLOGY AND SERUM BIOCHEMISTRY OF F AND F PIGS PRODUCED BY 1 2 ASF- RECOVERED PIGS. Ife Journal of Science. 17(2)adeoye_et_al_5.pdf
Oyekunle, AA.  2006.  Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Prospects and challenges in Nigeria.. Ann Ibad Postgraduate Med.. 4:17-27., Number 1 Abstract

Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has come to stay as a last resort to salvage several patients suffering from various haematological and non-haematological diseases; in developed economies. It however remains a dream for the majority of the patients who are without health insurance or reside in developing nations and thus unable to afford its enormous costs. Technological inequalities, brain drain and lack of political will have also impeded effective transfer of the necessary expertise.In Nigeria, the awareness of HSCT is limited. Even our specialists remain to be convinced because of the challenges posed by our infrastructure on the one hand and on the other hand; graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), post-transplant infections, relapse and organ toxicity. Moreso, sickle cell anaemia, which is likely to benefit most from HSCT in our environment, has not been able to attain the level of successes achieved with thalassemias in Europe and the USA. One must point out quickly however, that local opportunities at HSCT will go a long way to develop local expertise, boost confidence and innovation and ultimately improve results; benefits which will all be lost if we continue to refer our patients. Moreover, for HSCT, an additional obstacle is the need for matching donors for which the odds weigh inordinately against the Nigerian abroad.While we await the effective take-off of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), it is however instructive to note that a private-sector-driven HSCT initiative was recently started successfully in India despite difficulties, at a tenth of the cost in the West.

Mbada, C, Adeyemi A, Omosebi O, Olowokere A, Faremi F.  2015.  Hand Grip Strength in Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Females, 04. Middle East Journal of Rehabilitation and Health. 2 Abstract
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Alhajj, M, Omar R, Khader Y, Celebić A, El Tantawi M, Folayan M, Al-Maweri S, Halboub E, Alkheraif A, Sousa-Neto M, Vukovic A, Arheiam A, Ismail I, Abdullah A, Amran A, Kohli S, Ariffin Z, Kocaelli H, Khan DS, Muhammad F.  2020.  Happiness among dentists: a multi-scale, multi-national study from 21 countries, 2020/06/05. 70 Abstract
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D.O. Ayanda, A. I. Oluwaranti, Eludiora SI, and Alimi OM.  2011.  Harnessing the Potentials of Wireless Sensor Networks in the Context of Developing Countries: A Theoretical Perspective. International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Sciences and Engineering (IJETSE). Vol.4(1), 2011(USA.):p.84-89. Abstract

Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is an emerging technology that has the potential of transforming human life in the future. These sensor nodes can operate without any attendance in an environment and location including those where human presence is risky or not possible and therefore they can be deployed in a countless number of applications ranging from military to civilian purposes.
This paper examines the various applications of WSNs and how real-life deployment can form the bedrock of development towards achieving the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) and the much awaited Vision 20:2020 in Nigeria. The study also attemps to establish a synergy between reviving the economic growth as evidenced from government efforts through various initiatives and science and technology through adoption of the potentials of WSNs. The paper concludes by recommending practical approach that can be taken by the Nigerian government towards actualizing the evolving technology.

Aregbesola, S, Famurewa B, Soyele O, Komolafe A.  2019.  Head and neck lipomas: A clinicopathologic analysis of 36 cases, 2019/11/21. 11:1-5. Abstract

Lipomas are common benign soft tissue tumors, with 15 to 20% of the cases affecting the head and neck region and 1 to 4% involving the oral cavity. The literature has many reported cases of head and neck lipoma but few comprehensive studies hence, the aim of this study was to review and analyze the clinical and histopathologic features of head and neck lipomas in Nigerians. A fifteen-year retrospective study evaluated thirty-six cases of head and neck lipomas among Nigerians. Head and neck lipomas constituted about one-tenth (9.4%) of the total body lipomas seen over the study period. The peak age incidence was fifth decade of life and most (58.3%) of these patients were older than 40 years. There was male gender predilection with male to female ratio of 1.4:1. The most common site of occurrence was forehead (41.7%), followed by scalp and cheek (16.7% each). Lipomas were seen in two intraoral locations (lip and tongue) and these accounted for 13.9% of the head and neck lipomas and 1.3% of lipomas in the whole body. The average size of the lesion was 3.3 cm. Head and neck lipomas are fairly common among Nigerians who are more than 40 years of age. While the conventional and fibrolipoma were the two histologic variants recorded, complete surgical excision of the lesion offered satisfactory treatment outcome.

Oyetoro, OS, Oyetoro OV, Adegboye AC.  2018.  Head or tail: Do parents’ socio-economic status influence the performance of entry level senior secondary students in Economics? Journal of Information, Education, Science and Technology. 5(1):21-32.
Idowu, PA, Cornford D, Bastin L.  2008.  Health Informatics Deployment in Nigeria. Journal of Health Informatics in Developing Countries. 2(1):18-26.
A, O, Folayan M, T O, Harris G, Ogunbodede E.  2011.  Health workers perception of hospital’s institutional structure, 2011/01/01. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 1:79-88. Abstract
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A, O, Folayan M, T O, Harris G, Ogunbodede E.  2011.  Health workers perception of hospital’s institutional structure, 2011/01/01. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 1:79-88. Abstract
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Olukoga, A, Folayan M, Olukoga T, Harris G, Ogunbodede E.  2011.  Health workers perception of hospital’s institutional structure. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health . 1(3):79-88.
Olukoga, A, Tewari D, Folayan M, Osungbade K, Onajole A, Peters F.  2013.  Healthcare workers perception of human resources management in Nigeria . African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance . :294-311.
Adeyemo, A, Eziyi J, Amusa Y, Ameye S.  2017.  Hearing profile in children with allergic rhinitis, 2017/01/01. 4:10. Abstract
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Aransiola, EF, Ige OA, Ehinmitola EO, Layokun SK.  2017.  Heavy metals bioremediation potential of Klebsiella species isolated from diesel polluted soil. African Journal of Biotechnology. 16:1098–1105., Number 19: Academic Journals Abstract
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Ogunfowokan, AO, Adenuga AA, N. T, Okoh EK.  2008.  Heavy metals pollution in a sewage treatment oxidation pond and the receiving stream of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, Nigeria.. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment. 143(1-3):25-41.
Ogunbodede, E, Lawal O, Lamikanra A, N Okeke I, Rotimi O, A Rasheed A.  2002.  Helicobacter pylori in the dental plaque and gastric mucosa of dyspeptic Nigerian patients, 2002/07/01. Tropical gastroenterology : official journal of the Digestive Diseases Foundation. 23:127-33. Abstract

Presence of helicobacter pylori (H.Pylori) in the dental plaques may be associated with the presence of the same organism in gastric mucosa.To assess and compare the prevalence of H. pylori in dental plaques and gastric mucosa of dyspeptic Nigerians.
Sixty-six consecutive patients undergoing endoscopy for investigation of dyspepsia were included in the study. A predesigned questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-demographic and other factors. Each patient also had clinical dental examination. Dental plaque scrapping was collected before endoscopy for helicobacter pylori culture, and at endoscopy, two gastric biopsy specimens were taken for culture and histology.
The mean age (+/- SD) of the patients was 44.8 (+/- 17.4) years (range 5 to 80 years). The positivity rate of helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsy was 35 of 66 (53.0%) while the same for dental plaque was 46 of 66 (69.7%). The correlation (Spearman's) between gastric mucosa and dental plaque colonization with helicobactor pylori was significant (R = 0.30, P = 0.01). When concordant positivity of gastric biopsy culture and histology was taken as diagnostic, the sensitivity of dental plaque culture was found to be 82.9% and the specificity was 45.2%.
This study revealed that helicobactor pylori has a high prevalence in the dental plaque of the population that we have studied and may therefore be of potential relevance in screening for such infection.

Makinde, ON, Adegoke OA, Adeniran IA, Ndububa DA, Adeyemi AB, Owolabi AT, Kuti O, Orji EO, Salawu L.  2009.  HELLP syndrome: the experience at Ile-Ife, Nigeria.. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 29(3):195-199.