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A, AM, O O, O AA, O AA.  2015.  Effects of age and sex on autonomic cardiovascular indicies among apparently healthy young adults. Scholars Academic Journal of Biosciences. 3(12):1040-1043.sajb-3121040-1043.pdf
AA Ajayi, WAM.  2015.  Efficacy of Neem Seed and Neem Seed Kernel Powders onthe Survival, Longevity and Fecundity of Blowfly Chrysomya chloropyga (Wied.) (Diptera:Calliphoridae).. IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences (IOSR-JPBS). 10(Issue 3 Ver. I):72-85.: IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences Abstract
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Abereijo, IO.  2016.  Ensuring Environmental Sustainability through Sustainable Entrepreneurship. Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Policy for Sustainability. , Hershey: IGI Global
Abereijo, IO.  2018.  Entrepreneurship Education Delivery in Africa: Future Direction. Entrepreneurship Education: Opportunities, Challenges and Future Directions. , New York: Nova Science Publishers
Achimugu, P, Oluwagbemi Oluwatolani, and Oluwaranti A.  2010.  An Evaluation of The Impact of ICT Diffusion in Nigeria’s Higher Educational Institutions. Journal of Information Technology Impact. Vol. 10(1)(USA. [Online: http://www.jiti.com/v10/jiti.v10n1.025-034.pdf]):pp.25-34. Abstract

Higher education is approaching the point at which Science and Technology particularly Information and Communication Technology (ICT), plays a vital role in nearly all phases of the educational process. The Internet has emerged as a major driving force of this dynamic development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) which has impacted positively in virtually every sector of the Nigerian economy. In the education sector, tertiary institutions use computers in their academic programs in order to produce good quality of research output and learning. This paper focuses on how ICT diffusion has impacted the higher educational sector positively in Nigeria. The research also exposes the effect of ICT diffusion on undergraduate and postgraduate students of Nigeria’s tertiary institutions. A combination of observation, interview and document materials for data gathering was employed as methodology for carrying out this research. The result of the research suggests that ICT is becoming a driving force for educational reforms and that ICTs have become an integrative part of national education policies and plans in Nigerian
tertiary institutions.

Adanikin, AI, Orji EO, Fasubaa OB, Onwudiegwu U, Ijarotimi OA, Olaniyan O.  2012.  The effect of post-cesarean rectal misoprostol on intestinal motility.. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 119(2):159-62.
Adebajo, A, Odediran S, Nneji C, Iwalewa E, Rukunga G, Aladesanmi A, Gathirwa J, Ademowo O, Olugbade T, Schmidt T, Verspohl E.  2013.  Evaluation of Ethnomedical Claims II: Antimalarial Activities of Gongronema latifolium Root and Stem, 04. Journal of Herbs. 19 Abstract
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Adebajo, AC, Olayiwola G, Verspohl E, Iwalewa EO, Omisore NOA, Bergenthal D, Adesina SK.  2004.  Evaluation of the Ethnomedical Claims of Murraya koenigii. Journal of Pharmaceutical biology. Vol. 42(8):610-620.
Adebajo, AC, Ayoola MD, Odediran SA, Aladesanmi AJ, Schmidt TJ, Verspohl EJ.  2013.  Evaluation of ethnomedical claims IIIa: Anti-hyperglycaemic activities of Gongronema latifolium root and stem. Journal of Diabetes.
Adebajo, AC, Ayoola MD, Odediran SA, Aladesanmi AJ, Schmidt TJ, Verspohl EJ.  2013.  Evaluation of Ethnomedical Claim III: Anti-hyperglycemic activities of Gongronema latifolium root and stem. Journal of Diabetes. 5(3):336-343., Number 3 AbstractWebsite

Abstract Background The insulinotropic activity of the combined root and stem of Gongronema latifolium (Asclepiadaceae) was evaluated to justify its African ethnomedicinal use in the management of diabetes. Methods A methanolic extract and its chromatographic fractions (A1–A6) were tested for glucose-reducing and in vitro insulin-stimulating abilities using glucose-loaded rats and INS-1 cells, respectively. In vivo insulin-releasing activities for the significantly (P < 0.05) active antihyperglycemic A5 and A6 and in vitro insulinotropic activity of the C1 fraction and its isolated constituents were also similarly determined. Results The extract (100 mg/kg) had higher in vivo antihyperglycemic activity than the individual A1–A6, indicating a synergistic effect of the plant constituents. Higher in vivo insulin release in response to A5 (100 mg/kg) than A6, agreed with their in vivo antihyperglycemic activities and confirmed insulin release as a mechanism of action of the plant. Compared with 5.6 mmol/L glucose (negative control), the extract and the A3, A6, and C1 (all at 100.0 μg/mL) elicited significantly higher in vitro insulin release that was similar to that of glibenclamide (1.0 μg/mL; P > 0.05). Fraction C1 yielded a 1:1 mixture of α-amyrin and β-amyrin cinnamates (1a:1b), lupenyl cinnamate (2), lupenyl acetate (3), and two unidentified triterpenoids, Y and Z. The 1a:1b mixture (100.0 μg/mL) demonstrated the highest insulinotropic activity that was comparable (P > 0.05) to that of glibenclamide (1.0 μg/mL). Conclusions The results confirm pancreatic activity as a mechanism underlying the antidiabetic action of G. latifolium and justify its ethnomedical use.

Adebajo, AC, Odediran SA, Rukunga GM, Ademowo OG, Schmidt TJ, Verspohl EJ.  2013.  Evaluation of ethnomedical claims: Antiplasmodial and anti-hyperglycaemic activities of Gongronema latifolium root and stem, 1-5th Sept, 2013. 61st Conference of the Gesellschaft für Arzneipflanzenforschung (GA), Planta Medica; 79(13): PE1. 79, Number 13, Institut für Pharmazeutische Biologie und Phytochemie, WWU, Münster, Germany: Georg Thieme Verlag {KG} Abstract

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Adebajo, AC, Odediran SA, Nneji CM, Iwalewa EO, Rukunga GM, Aladesanmi AJ, Gathirwa JW, Ademowo OG, Olugbade TA, Schmidt TJ, Verspohl EJ.  2013.  Evaluation of Ethnomedical Claims II: Antimalarial Activities of Gongronema latifolium Root and Stem. Journal of Herbs, Spices & Medicinal Plants. 19(2):97-118., Number 2: Taylor & Francis AbstractWebsite

Methanolic extract and chromatographic fractions of Gongronema latifolium were tested against clinical isolates of Plasmodium falciparum-, P. yoelii nigeriensis-infected mice, chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) P. falciparum clones. The isolates, characterized as a 1:1 mixture of α-amyrin and β-amyrin cinnamates (1a/1b), lupenyl cinnamate (2) and lupenyl acetate (3), were assayed using the clones. Extract, most active vacuum liquid and column chromatographic fractions had respective ED50 values of 120.85, 32.03, 25.62 mg.kg-1 and IC50 of 36.27, 9.45, 7.05 μg.mL-1, against W2 clones. Lupenyl acetate had 18.96 μg.mL-1, indicating synergistic action of the constituents. Results justified its ethnomedical use for treating malaria.

Adebajo, AC, Rukunga GM, Schmidt TJ, Verspohl EJ.  2013.  Evaluation of Nigerian ethnomedical plants for anti-infective and antidiabetic properties, 1–5th Sept, 2013. 61st Conference of the Gesellschaft für Arzneipflanzenforschung (GA), Planta Medica; 79(13): SL21. 79, Number 13, Institut für Pharmazeutische Biologie und Phytochemie, WWU, Münster, Germany: Georg Thieme Verlag {KG} Abstract

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Adebisi, TA.  2010.  Effects of computer Training Programmes on Alleviation of Unemployment among Secondary School Leavers in Ile-Ife Metropolis, Osun State, Nigeria. International Journal of Contemporary Issues in Education. 2:386-392.
Adebiyi, R, Babalola O, Amuda-Yusuf G, Rasheed S, Olowa T.  2020.  Effect of Knowledge and Compliance of Health and Safety Information on Construction Sites Workers’ Safety in Nigeria, 2020/04/30. 10:269-277. Abstract
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Adebiyi, RT, Babalola O, Amuda-Yusuf G, Rasheed SA, Olowa TO.  2020.  Effect of knowledge and compliance of health and safety information on construction sites workers’ safety in Nigeria. International Journal of Safety and Security Engineering. 10:269–277., Number 2 Abstract
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Adebowale, OF, Popoola BI, Obisakin CB, Aluede O.  2012.  The Emerging Role of ICT (Online Counselling) in Nigerian Universities: The Obafemi Awolowo University Experience.. The Counsellor. 31(1):25-38..