Publications

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Submitted
Nwhator, SO, Uhunmwangho I, B. C, Ikponmwosa O.  Submitted.  Aggressive periodontitis in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice. 15:518–522., Number 4 Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Umeizudike KA, Ayanbadejo PO, Opeodu OI, Olamijulo JA, Sorsa T.  Submitted.  Another reason for impeccable oral hygiene: oral hygiene-sperm count link. Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice. 15:352–358., Number 3 Abstract
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Ayanbadejo, PO, Nwhator SO, Umeizudike KA, Isiavwe AR.  Submitted.  Awareness on the effect of periodontitis on glycemic control in type 2 diabetics: A pilot survey. New Nigerian Journal of Clinical Research. 2:210–216., Number 3 Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Umeizudike KA, Ayanbadejo PO, Agbelusi GA, Arowojolu MO.  Submitted.  Black women's predisposition to preterm birth; could we be near the answer? International Journal of Tropical Disease and Health. 4:194–203., Number 2 Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Ayanbadejo PO, Umeizudike KA, Opeodu OI, Agbelusi GA, Olamijulo JA, Arowojolu MO, Sorsa T, Babajide BS, Opedun DO.  Submitted.  Clinical correlates of a lateral-flow immunoassay oral risk indicator. Journal of Periodontology. 85:188–194., Number 1 Abstract
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Umeizudike, KA, Ayanbadejo PO, Savage KO, Nwhator SO, Akanmu AS, Ogunleye O.  Submitted.  Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus- positive patients and controls in a dedicated human immunodeficiency virus clinic in Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. 19:35–40., Number 1 Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Opeodu OI, Ayanbadejo PO, Umeizudike KA, Olamijulo JA, Alade GO, Agbelusi GA, Arowojolu MO, Sorsa T.  Submitted.  Could periodontitis affect time to conception? Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research. 4:817–822., Number 5 Abstract
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Ige, OO, Shittu MD, Oluwasegun KM, Olorunniwo OE, Umoru LE.  Submitted.  ECO-FRIENDLY INHIBITORS FOR EROSION-CORROSION MITIGATION OF API-X65STEELIN CO2ENVIRONMENT. Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Umeizudike KA, Samuel TA, Soroye MO, Umeizudike TI.  Submitted.  Periodontitis & sub-fertility; opinions and practices of Nigerian specialists. West African Journal of Medicine. 32:267–271., Number 4 Abstract
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Umeizudike, KA, Ayanbadejo PO, Savage KO, Akanmu AS, Nwhator SO, Emeka CI.  Submitted.  Prevalence and determinants of chronic periodontitis in HIV-positive patients in Nigeria. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease. 4:306–312., Number 4 Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Uhunmwangho I.  Submitted.  Proposing a novel protocol for halitosis assessment. Odonto-Stomatologie Tropicale (Tropical Dental Journal. 36:15–24., Number 144 Abstract
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2022
Asaolu, OS, Jaiyeola TG, Usikalu MR, Gayawan E, Atolani O, Adeyemi OS.  2022.  U-index: A New Universal Metric as Unique Indicator of Researcher’s Contributions to Academic Knowledge. Scientific African. 16:e01231.
2021
Folayan, M, Olanrewaju I, Brown B, El Tantawi M, Uzochukwu B, Ezechi O, M. Aly N, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ayoola O, Osamika B, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Nguyen A.  2021.  Differences in COVID-19 Preventive Behavior and Food Insecurity by HIV Status in Nigeria, 2021/08/13. :3. Abstract
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Folayan, M, Olanrewaju I, Brown B, El Tantawi M, Uzochukwu B, Ezechi O, M. Aly N, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ayoola O, Osamika B, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Nguyen A.  2021.  Differences in COVID-19 Preventive Behavior and Food Insecurity by HIV Status in Nigeria, 2021/08/13. :3. Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess if there were significant differences in the adoption of COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors and experience of food insecurity by people living with and without HIV in Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study that recruited a convenience sample of 4471 (20.5% HIV positive) adults in Nigeria. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to test the associations between the explanatory variable (HIV positive and non-positive status) and the outcome variables-COVID-19 related behavior changes (physical distancing, isolation/quarantine, working remotely) and food insecurity (hungry but did not eat, cut the size of meals/skip meals) controlling for age, sex at birth, COVID-19 status, and medical status of respondents. Significantly fewer people living with HIV (PLWH) reported a positive COVID-19 test result; and had lower odds of practicing COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors. In comparison with those living without HIV, PLWH had higher odds of cutting meal sizes as a food security measure (AOR: 3.18; 95% CI 2.60-3.88) and lower odds of being hungry and not eating (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI 0.20-0.30). In conclusion, associations between HIV status, COVID-19 preventive behaviors and food security are highly complex and warrant further in-depth to unravel the incongruities identified.

Folayan, M, Ibigbami O, Brown B, El Tantawi M, Uzochukwu B, Ezechi O, M. Aly N, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ayoola O, Osamika B, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Nguyen A.  2021.  Differences in COVID-19 Preventive Behavior and Food Insecurity by HIV Status in Nigeria, 2021/08/13. :3. Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess if there were significant differences in the adoption of COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors and experience of food insecurity by people living with and without HIV in Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study that recruited a convenience sample of 4471 (20.5% HIV positive) adults in Nigeria. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to test the associations between the explanatory variable (HIV positive and non-positive status) and the outcome variables-COVID-19 related behavior changes (physical distancing, isolation/quarantine, working remotely) and food insecurity (hungry but did not eat, cut the size of meals/skip meals) controlling for age, sex at birth, COVID-19 status, and medical status of respondents. Significantly fewer people living with HIV (PLWH) reported a positive COVID-19 test result; and had lower odds of practicing COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors. In comparison with those living without HIV, PLWH had higher odds of cutting meal sizes as a food security measure (AOR: 3.18; 95% CI 2.60-3.88) and lower odds of being hungry and not eating (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI 0.20-0.30). In conclusion, associations between HIV status, COVID-19 preventive behaviors and food security are highly complex and warrant further in-depth to unravel the incongruities identified.

Soyoye, D, Kolawole B, Ikem R, Ugwu E, Soyoye O, Owolabi F, Anozie C, Amjo O, Ogundele O.  2021.  Screening for Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension in Ile-Ife - A World Diabetes Day Experience, 2021/05/29. 38:434-438. Abstract

Background and objectives:Non-communicable diseases have emerged as major public health concerns in developing nations, where communicable diseases used to be the major contributor to the public health burden. Diabetes and hypertension contribute significantly to this menace, and they are largely undiagnosed in the affected population. We determined the prevalence of previously diagnosed and undiagnosed hypertension and diabetes mellitus in adult Nigerians.
Methods:
Participants who presented in response to advertisement for the study and gave informed consent were recruited using convenience sampling. Data was collected using a proforma to obtain salient medical and social history. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were done. Capillary blood was taken for initial glucose measurements. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was subsequently done in non-diabetics with elevated blood glucose to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes.
Results:
One hundred and thirty-six participants with age range 24 - 90 years were recruited for the study. Participants were mainly females (61.8%). Prevalence of diabetes among study participants was 19.9% (previously diagnosed -16.9% vs undiagnosed - 3.0%) with higher occurrence among males. Hypertension was found in 50.7% of participants; 28.7% were on treatment for hypertension, while 22.0% were newly diagnosed. Diabetes was associated with older age and elevated systolic blood pressure while hypertension was associated with older age, obesity and elevated blood glucose.
Conclusion:
This study showed a high occurrence of diabetes and hypertension among adult Nigerians; hence efforts to address these should be intensified. Targeted screening of people at risk for non-communicable diseases is an added benefit.

Borisade, T, Odiwe A, Akinwumiju A, Orimoogunje O, Uwalaka N.  2021.  Assessing the impacts of land use on riparian vegetation dynamics in Osun State, Nigeria, 2021/05/01. 5:100099. Abstract

The existence of riparian vegetation is greatly threatened by change in land uses in Nigeria and information on historical management of land use which influences riparian vegetation dynamics is critical to the conservation of plants species diversity. This information is poorly understood especially in Nigeria and by extension in Africa. This study therefore assessed the areas covered by riparian forests in Osun State, Nigeria in order to identify the main drivers of its decline using optical remote sensing data. It also assessed the availability and distribution of the riparian forests over three decades (1986-2016) using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM). Results showed that the riparian forests covered 546.18km² (6.40%) with about 308riparian forests distributed across the state in 1986 but had declined to 176 by 2016. Three decades later, areas covered by riparian forests decreased to171.69km² (2.01%), representing a decline of about 69% and was predicted a rapid transition to disturbed lands. Human activities such as logging, farming, grazing and construction have greatly influenced the riparian vegetation cover with obvious decline in extent, distribution and quality. Observation from our case study showed that the disappearance of these forests is taken place at a rate that is faster than the predicted level of the Nigerian riparian forest loss by 2040. Notably deforestation, agriculture and urbanization are the main drivers of this decline, of the African gallery forests.

Ukpong, D, Ibigbami O.  2021.  Correlates of Quality of Life in Caregivers of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Affective Disorder: A Study From Southwestern Nigeria, 2021/04/01. 32:26-32. Abstract

Objective:Quality of life and its correlates were studied in two groups of family caregivers of patients with major mental disorders-Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar Affective Disorder (BPAD).
Method:
Family caregivers of SZ and BPAD patients were consecutively recruited to the study (n=100 for each group). Caregivers were screened for quality of life (QOL) measures, caregiver burden, symptoms of anxiety and depression, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF), the Pai and Kapur Family Burden Interview Schedule (FBIS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Inventory (HADS) respectively.
Results:
When compared to the caregivers of the BPAD patients, the caregivers of the SZ patients had lower QOL scores in two out of the 4 WHOQOL-BREF domains (physical and psychological domains) (p=0.001), and higher overall total caregiver burden (p=0.001). On the other hand, caregivers of the BPAD patients had higher levels of depressive symptoms (p=0.001). Increased depressive symptoms were associated with lower QOL for both groups, comprising all WHOQOLBREF domains for BPAD and 3 domains for SZ caregivers. Higher caregiver burden was associated with lower QOL for both groups.
Conclusion:
There is a need for intervention and caregiver support for the relatives of patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Akpa, OM, Okekunle AP, Ovbiagele B, Sarfo FS, Akinyemi RO, Akpalu A, Wahab KW, Komolafe M, Obiako R, Owolabi LF, Ogbole G, Fawale B, Fakunle A, Asaleye CM, Akisanya CO, Hamisu DA, Ogunjimi L, Adeoye A, Ogah O, Lackland D, Uvere EO, Faniyan MM, Asowata OJ, Adeleye O, Aridegbe M, Olunuga T, Yahaya IS, Olaleye A, Calys-Tagoe B, Owolabi MO.  2021.  Factors associated with hypertension among stroke-free indigenous Africans: Findings from the SIREN study, 2021. Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 23(4) Abstract

Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for stroke and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) globally. Understanding risk factors for hypertension among individuals with matching characteristics with stroke patients may inform primordial/primary prevention of hypertension and stroke among them. This study identified the risk factors for hypertension among community-dwelling stroke-free population in Ghana and Nigeria. Data for 4267 community-dwelling stroke-free controls subjects in the Stroke Investigative Research and Education Network (SIREN) study in Nigeria and Ghana were used. Participants were comprehensively assessed for sociodemographic, lifestyle and metabolic factors using standard methods. Hypertension was defined as a previous diagnosis by a health professional or use of an anti-hypertensive drug or mean systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) of hypertension and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) at p <.05. Overall, 56.7% of the participants were hypertensive with a higher proportion among respondents aged ≥60 years (53.0%). Factors including physical inactivity (aOR: 9.09; 95% CI: 4.03 to 20.53, p <.0001), diabetes (aOR: 2.70; CI: 1.91 to 3.82, p <.0001), being ≥60 years (aOR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.77, p <.0001), and family history of CVD (aOR 2.02; CI: 1.59 to 2.56, p <.0001) were associated with increased aOR of hypertension. Lifestyle factors were associated with hypertension in the current population of community-dwelling stroke-free controls in west Africa. Community-oriented interventions to address sedentary lifestyles may benefit this population and reduce/prevent hypertension and stroke among them.

Akpa, O, Sarfo FS, Owolabi M, Akpalu A, Wahab K, Obiako R, Komolafe M, Owolabi L, Osaigbovo GO, Ogbole G, Tiwari HK, Jenkins C, Fakunle AG, Olowookere S, Uvere EO, Akinyemi J, Arulogun O, Akpalu J, Tito-Ilori MM, Asowata OJ, Ibinaiye P, Akisanya C, Oyinloye OI, Appiah L, Sunmonu T, Olowoyo P, Agunloye AM, Adeoye AM, Yaria J, Lackland DT, Arnett D, Laryea RY, Adigun TO, Okekunle AP, Calys-Tagoe B, Ogah OS, Ogunronbi M, Obiabo OY, Isah SY, Dambatta HA, Tagge R, Ogenyi O, Fawale B, Melikam CL, Onasanya A, Adeniyi S, Akinyemi R, Ovbiagele B.  2021.  A Novel Afrocentric Stroke Risk Assessment Score: Models from the Siren Study, 2021. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 30(10) Abstract

Background: Stroke risk can be quantified using risk factors whose effect sizes vary by geography and race. No stroke risk assessment tool exists to estimate aggregate stroke risk for indigenous African. Objectives: To develop Afrocentric risk-scoring models for stroke occurrence. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 3533 radiologically confirmed West African stroke cases paired 1:1 with age-, and sex-matched stroke-free controls in the SIREN study. The 7,066 subjects were randomly split into a training and testing set at the ratio of 85:15. Conditional logistic regression models were constructed by including 17 putative factors linked to stroke occurrence using the training set. Significant risk factors were assigned constant and standardized statistical weights based on regression coefficients (β) to develop an additive risk scoring system on a scale of 0–100%. Using the testing set, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves were constructed to obtain a total score to serve as cut-off to discriminate between cases and controls. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) at this cut-off. Results: For stroke occurrence, we identified 15 traditional vascular factors. Cohen's kappa for validity was maximal at a total risk score of 56% using both statistical weighting approaches to risk quantification and in both datasets. The risk score had a predictive accuracy of 76% (95%CI: 74–79%), sensitivity of 80.3%, specificity of 63.0%, PPV of 68.5% and NPV of 76.2% in the test dataset. For ischemic strokes, 12 risk factors had predictive accuracy of 78% (95%CI: 74–81%). For hemorrhagic strokes, 7 factors had a predictive accuracy of 79% (95%CI: 73–84%). Conclusions: The SIREN models quantify aggregate stroke risk in indigenous West Africans with good accuracy. Prospective studies are needed to validate this instrument for stroke prevention.

Oginni, O, Oloniniyi I, Ibigbami O, Ugo V, Amiola A, Ogunbajo A, Esan O, Adelola A, Daropale O, Ebuka M, Mapayi B.  2021.  Depressive and anxiety symptoms and COVID-19-related factors among men and women in Nigeria, 08. PLOS ONE. 16:e0256690. Abstract
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Article, R, Olukemi B-T, Ojo O, Ao J, Uvie O, Babajide A, Eyekpegha O, Oguns A.  2021.  Evaluation of the Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Delivery of Paediatric Cardiac Services in Nigeria, 05. Cardiology & Vascular Research. 5:1-5. Abstract
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Kadiri, DS, Uroko OK, Onabanjo BO, Oyewole EO.  2021.  AN EVALUATION OF PLANNING TECHNIQUES IMPACTING CONSTRUCTION PROJECT PERFORMANCE IN NIGERIA. Construction Business and Project Management Conference. :138-147., South Africa: University of Cape Townplanning_techniques_impacting....doc
Adesunkanmi, AHO, Ubom AE, Olasehinde O, Wuraola FO, Ijarotimi OA, Okon NE, Ikimalo JI, Fasubaa OB, Adesunkanmi ARK.  2021.  Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical residency training: perspective from a low-middle income country. World Journal of Surgery. 45:10–17., Number 1: Springer Abstract
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2020
Orisabinone, I, Uche O, Babalola A, Oriji P, Makinde O.  2020.  Shortened versus standard post-partum maintenance therapy of magnesium sulphate in severe pre-eclampsia: a randomised control trial, 04. International Journal of Reproduction, Contraception, Obstetrics and Gynecology. 9:1646-1653. Abstract
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