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Journal Article
Baccarani, M, Castagnetti F, Gugliotta G, Rosti G, Soverini S, Albeer A, Pfirrmann M.  2019.  The proportion of different BCR-ABL1 transcript types in chronic myeloid leukemia. An international overview. Leukemia. 33:1173–1183., Number 5: Nature Publishing Group Abstract
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Fadeiye, E, OC O, Soyoye D, RT I, TM O, TM O, O K, Ilona P.  2018.  Blood-glucose-response-on-consumption-of-cassava-varieties-garri-in-healthy Nigerian-subjects, 2018/01/18. 02 Abstract

Cassava is an important staple consumed in various forms by humans. The glycemic index and load of some Nigerian foods are well documented, but not much is documented on Vitamin A bio-fortified pruned cassava. The study determined blood glucose response in normal freeliving volunteer adults after consumption of vitamin A bio-fortified normally grown cassava (A), vitamin A bio-fortified pruned cassava (B) and non-bio-fortified normally grown cassava (C). The study employed single blind, randomized, cross-over investigation on 40 consenting apparently healthy adult volunteers with a documented normal fasting blood glucose level prior to recruitment. Fasting blood sugar level and post prandial of the participants were obtained on each day of the study after the consumption of 360 g of treatments (A, B&C eba) which was equivalent to 75 g anhydrous glucose using Accu-check glucometer. The treatments were served with vegetable soup prepared with fish and was administered to the subjects in a randomized manner. Oral glucose D was used as standard food. Post prandial glucose response (mg/dL) was obtained at 1 hour and 2 hours respectively. Data analyses were done using SPSS (version 22). Descriptive analysis was carried out and data were presented in percentages/proportions, means and standard deviations at 0.05% level of confidence. The 2 hours glucose post prandial (2 hrpp) for Treatment A, B and C in Mg/dL were 92.24, 94.74 and 98.91, while the glycemic loads were 308.0, 297.0 and 316.2 respectively. Treatment B had the lowest glycemic load. It was concluded that vitamin A bio-fortified cassava (especially when pruned before harvesting) had a lower post prandial glucose response, lower carbohydrate content and lowest glycemic load when compared to the non-bio-fortified conventional Garri. This variety of cassava may be better tolerated by people with metabolic disease/diabetes mellitus.

Owolabi, MO, Sarfo F, Akinyemi R, Gebregziabher M, Akpa O, Akpalu A, Wahab K, Obiako R, Ovbiagele B, Sarfo FS, Akinyemi R, Gebregziabher M, Akpa O, Akpalu A, Obiako R, Ovbiagele B, Tiwari HK, Arnett D, Lackland D, Adeoye AM, Akin O, Ogbole G, Jenkins C, Arulogun O, Ryan IM, Armstrong K, Olowoyo P, Komolafe M, Osaigbovo G, Obiabo O, Chukwuonye I, Adebayo P, Adebayo O, Omololu A, Otubogun F, Olaleye A, Durodola A, Olunuga T, Akinwande K, Aridegbe M, Fawale B, Adeleye O, Kolo P, Appiah L, Singh A, Adamu S, Awuah D, Saulson R, Agyekum F, Shidali V, Ogah O, Oguntade A, Umanruochi K, Iheonye H, Imoh L, Afolaranmi T, Calys-Tagoe B, Okeke O, Fakunle A, Akinyemi J, Akpalu J, Ibinaiye P, Agunloye A, Sanni T, Bisi A, Efidi C, Bock-Oruma A, Melikam S, Olaniyan L, Yaria J, Odo CJ, Lakoh S, Ogunjimi L, Salaam A, Oyinloye L, Asaleye C, Sanya E, Olowookere S, Makanjuola A, Oguntoye A, Uvere E, Faniyan M, Akintunde A, Kehinde I, Diala S, Adeleye O, Ajose OA, Onyeonoro U, Amusa AG, Owusu D, Mensah Y, Owolabi L.  2018.  Dominant modifiable risk factors for stroke in Ghana and Nigeria (SIREN): a case-control study, 2018. The Lancet Global Health. 6(4) Abstract

Background: Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence, prevalence, and fatality from stroke globally. Yet, only little information about context-specific risk factors for prioritising interventions to reduce the stroke burden in sub-Saharan Africa is available. We aimed to identify and characterise the effect of the top modifiable risk factors for stroke in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: The Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network (SIREN) study is a multicentre, case-control study done at 15 sites in Nigeria and Ghana. Cases were adults (aged ≥18 years) with stroke confirmed by CT or MRI. Controls were age-matched and gender-matched stroke-free adults (aged ≥18 years) recruited from the communities in catchment areas of cases. Comprehensive assessment for vascular, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors was done using standard instruments. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and population-attributable risks (PARs) with 95% CIs. Findings: Between Aug 28, 2014, and June 15, 2017, we enrolled 2118 case-control pairs (1192 [56%] men) with mean ages of 59·0 years (SD 13·8) for cases and 57·8 years (13·7) for controls. 1430 (68%) had ischaemic stoke, 682 (32%) had haemorrhagic stroke, and six (<1%) had discrete ischaemic and haemorrhagic lesions. 98·2% (95% CI 97·2–99·0) of adjusted PAR of stroke was associated with 11 potentially modifiable risk factors with ORs and PARs in descending order of PAR of 19·36 (95% CI 12·11–30·93) and 90·8% (95% CI 87·9–93·7) for hypertension, 1·85 (1·44–2·38) and 35·8% (25·3–46·2) for dyslipidaemia, 1·59 (1·19–2·13) and 31·1% (13·3–48·9) for regular meat consumption, 1·48 (1·13–1·94) and 26·5% (12·9–40·2) for elevated waist-to-hip ratio, 2·58 (1·98–3·37) and 22·1% (17·8–26·4) for diabetes, 2·43 (1·81–3·26) and 18·2% (14·1–22·3) for low green leafy vegetable consumption, 1·89 (1·40–2·54) and 11·6% (6·6–16·7) for stress, 2·14 (1·34–3·43) and 5·3% (3·3–7·3) for added salt at the table, 1·65 (1·09–2·49) and 4·3% (0·6–7·9) for cardiac disease, 2·13 (1·12–4·05) and 2·4% (0·7–4·1) for physical inactivity, and 4·42 (1·75–11·16) and 2·3% (1·5–3·1) for current cigarette smoking. Ten of these factors were associated with ischaemic stroke and six with haemorrhagic stroke occurrence. Interpretation: Implementation of interventions targeting these leading risk factors at the population level should substantially curtail the burden of stroke among Africans. Funding: National Institutes of Health.

G.O., O, D. J, P.A. M, T.D. B, L.J.J. G, M.A. E, W.L. A, C.A. L, C.C. L, A. O, P.B. O, B.S. A, undefined, Bello S.A., P. D, R. A, C. O, S. O-Y, G. P-R, O.M. O, O. J, T. H, F. A, L.O. A-R, A.V. O, L. M, M.L. M, J.C. M, A.A. A.  2018.  Identification of paternal uniparental disomy on chromosome 22 and a de novo deletion on chromosome 18 in individuals with orofacial clefts. Mol Genet Genomic Med. 6(6 ):924-932.
M.A., E, H. L, M. L, W.L. A, L.J.J. G, P.A. M, T. B, W. D, P. D, P.B. O, B.S. A, R.O. B, G.O. O, F. O, R. A, C. O, O. J, E. A-A, L.A. R, M.O. O, F.K.N A, Bello S.A., P. A, P. T, F. A, T. H, Y. D, A. H, G. P-R, S. O-Y, M.M. D, P.E. G, M.L. M, A.A. A, J.C M, R.A. C, A. B.  2018.  Loss-of-function GRHL3 variants detected in African patients with isolated cleft palate.. J Dent Res. 97(1 ):41–48.p22_-_eshete_et_al._2018-loss-of-fxn-jdr.pdf
L.J.J., G, G. O, P.A. M, W.L. A, M.A. E, T.D. B, P. D, S. O-Y, G. P-R, A.A. O, A. O, P.B. O, B.S. A, F.O. O, Bello S.A., R. A, C. O, P. A, M.O. O, L.O. A-R, M.L. M, A.A. A, J.C. M, A. B.  2018.  Novel GREM1 variations in Sub-Saharan African patients with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. 55(5):736-742.
Olagunju, A, Rajoli RKR, Atoyebi SA, Khoo S, Owen A, Siccardi M.  2018.  Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling of infant exposure to efavirenz through breastfeeding. AAS Open Res. 1:16 (doi: 10.12688/aasopenres.12860.1) AbstractFull Text Available Here

Background: Very little is known about the level of infant exposure to many drugs commonly used during breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for predicting infant exposure to maternal efavirenz through breastmilk.

Methods: A breastfeeding PBPK model combining whole-body maternal and infant sub-models was constructed from drug-specific and system parameters affecting drug disposition using mathematical descriptions. The model was validated against published data on the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in nursing mother-infant pairs. Further simulations were conducted to assess exposure in the context of the 400 mg reduced dose of efavirenz as well as best- and worse-case scenarios.

Results: The model adequately described efavirenz pharmacokinetics, with over 80% of observed data points (203 matched breast milk and plasma pairs) within the predictive interval. All parameters were within 2-fold difference of clinical data. Median (range) predicted versus observed breast milk AUC0-24, Cmax and Cmin at the standard 600 mg dose were 75.0 (18.5-324) versus 68.5 (26.3-257) µg.hr/mL, 4.56 (1.17-16.0) versus 5.39 (1.43-18.4) µg/mL, and 2.11 (0.38-12.3) versus 1.68 (0.316-9.57) µg/mL, respectively. Predicted plasma AUC0-24, Cmax and Cmin at 400 mg reduced dose were similar to clinical data from non-breastfeeding adults. Model-predicted infant plasma concentrations were similar to clinical data, 0.15 (0.026–0.78) μg/mL at the 400 mg maternal dose in pooled analysis, approximately 25% lower than simulated exposure at 600 mg. The maximum exposure index was observed in the youngest infants, 5.9% (2.2-20) at 400 mg and 8.7% (3.2-29) at 600 mg. Thirteen and 36% of 10 days-1 month old infants were predicted to have exposure index above the 10% recommended threshold at 400 mg and 600 mg maternal dose, respectively.

Conclusions: This application of PBPK modelling opens up opportunities for expanding our understanding of infant exposure to maternal drugs through breastfeeding.

Akinluwade, KJ, Rominiyi AL, Isadare DA, Adetunji AR, Adeoye MO.  2018.  Pack-cyaniding: A Comparative Study of Low and High-Temperature Treatment. Archives of Current Research International. :1–12. Abstract
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Sartelli, M, Kluger Y, Ansaloni L, Hardcastle TC, Rello J, Watkins RR, Bassetti M, Giamarellou E, Coccolini F, Abu-Zidan FM, others.  2018.  Raising concerns about the Sepsis-3 definitions. World Journal of Emergency Surgery. 13:1–9., Number 1: BioMed Central Abstract
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Nahar, N, Badmus SA, Das SK, Malek MIA, Rahman M, Khan MAM.  2018.  Retinopathy of prematurity in Bangladesh: an overview. Community eye health. 31:S25., Number 101: International Centre for Eye Health Abstract
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Shakur-Still, H, Roberts I, Fawole B, Chaudhri R, El-Sheikh M, Akintan A, Qureshi Z, Kidanto H, Vwalika B, Abdulkadir A, Etuk S, Noor S, Asonganyi Defang E, Alfirevic Z, Beaumont D, Ronsmans C, Arulkumaran S, Grant A, Afsana K, Faye G.  2017.  Effect of early tranexamic acid administration on mortality, hysterectomy, and other morbidities in women with post-partum haemorrhage (WOMAN): An international, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 04. The Lancet. 389 Abstract
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Shakur-Still, H, Roberts I, Fawole B, Chaudhri R, El-Sheikh M, Akintan A, Qureshi Z, Kidanto H, Vwalika B, Abdulkadir A, Etuk S, Noor S, Asonganyi Defang E, Alfirevic Z, Beaumont D, Ronsmans C, Arulkumaran S, Grant A, Afsana K, Faye G.  2017.  Effect of early tranexamic acid administration on mortality, hysterectomy, and other morbidities in women with post-partum haemorrhage (WOMAN): An international, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 04. The Lancet. 389 Abstract
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Ayanlade, A, Radeny M, Morton JF.  2017.  Comparing smallholder farmers' perception of climate change with meteorological data: A case study from southwestern Nigeria. Weather and Climate Extremes. 15(3):24-33,Elsevier.Website
Shacklett, BL, Derdeyn CA, Folayan MO, Landovitz RJ, Anthony C, Behrens A-J, Hope TJ, Landais E, Leal L, Marrazzo JM, Morris L, Mugo N, Ngure K, Noseda V, Ranasinghe S, Tully DC, Voronin Y, Warren M, Wibmer CK, Xie IY, Scarlatti G, Thyagarajan B.  2017.  HIVR4P 2016, partnering for prevention: conference summary and highlights. . AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses Journal . :.doi:10.1089/AID.2017.0125.
R.O, B, K.C N, F.J O, S.B A.  2017.  Impact of oral antibiotics on health related quality of life after mandibular third molar surgery: An observational study. Nigerian J Clinical Practice. 20:1189-1194.
O.O, S, R.O B, A.A I, A.O T, M.O G, S.B A.  2017.  Ossifying Fibroma: Clinico-pathologic and immunohistochemical investigation of 157 cases in a tertiary referral centre. Research & Reviews: J Dental Sciences. 5(1):45-50.
R.O., B, O.O. S, S.B. A, M.A. R.  2017.  Pattern of histologically diagnosed orofacial tumour and disparity in number managed in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital: A 5-year review. Journal of dental & Allied Sciences. 2(6 ):60-64.
L.J.J, G, T.D B, P.A M, M.A E, W.L A, B A, P D, F.K.N A, P A, O J, P T, R B, A.A O, G P-R, S O-Y, F A, P.E H-W, T H, J.C M, A B.  2017.  The prevalence, penetrance and expressivity of etiologic IRF6 variants in orofacial clefts patients from sub-Saharan Africa. Molecular Genetics Genomic Med.. 5(2):164-171.
R.O, B, A.S A, A.O T, A.A I, M.O G, S.B A, K A, M B.  2017.  Risk factors and mortality rate of acute cancrum oris (noma) in Sokoto, North-West Nigeria: A 13-year survey. J Pediatric Dentistry. 5(1):1-5.
Birindelli, A, Sartelli M, Di Saverio S, Coccolini F, Ansaloni L, van Ramshorst GH, Campanelli G, Khokha V, Moore EE, Peitzman A, others.  2017.  2017 update of the WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias. World journal of emergency surgery. 12:1–16., Number 1: BioMed Central Abstract
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Birindelli, A, Sartelli M, Di Saverio S, Coccolini F, Ansaloni L, van Ramshorst GH, Campanelli G, Khokha V, Moore EE, Peitzman A, others.  2017.  2017 update of the WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias. World journal of emergency surgery. 12:1–16., Number 1: BioMed Central Abstract
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Ranti, TADEBIYI, Olubola B, Amuda-Yusuf G.  2017.  AN ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HEALTH AND SAFETY COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY. : The Department of Architecture, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria-Nigera Abstract
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Sartelli, M, Weber DG, Ruppé E, Bassetti M, Wright BJ, Ansaloni L, Catena F, Coccolini F, Abu-Zidan FM, Coimbra R, others.  2017.  Erratum to: Antimicrobials: a global alliance for optimizing their rational use in intra-abdominal infections (AGORA). World Journal of Emergency Surgery. 12:1–3., Number 1: BioMed Central Abstract
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