Publications

Export 1312 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Asc)] Title Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N [O] P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
O
O.O, S, R.O B, A.A I, A.O T, M.O G, S.B A.  2017.  Ossifying Fibroma: Clinico-pathologic and immunohistochemical investigation of 157 cases in a tertiary referral centre. Research & Reviews: J Dental Sciences. 5(1):45-50.
O.T., A, A.K A.  2008.  Pupillary changes among Nigerian adults following the instillation of Garcinia kola nut extracts: multicentric studies. Instillation of Garcinia Kola Nut Extract: The Nigerian postgraduate Medical Journal. 15 (3).:152-156.
OA, A, Adelusola K A, O SI, WA O, B BK.  2006.  Hypertension, erythrocyturia and proteinuria in childhood non‐Hodgkin’s lymphoma.. Nephrology. vol. 11(3):165-170.
OA, A, Adelusola K A, O SI, WA O, B BK.  2006.  Hypertension, erythrocyturia and proteinuria in childhood non‐Hodgkin’s lymphoma.. Nephrology. vol. 11(3):165-170.
Obadiora, AH, Obadiora AJ.  2018.  Social interactional effect of participation in different sports by inmates of ILESA prison in OSUN State of Nigeria. International Journal of Physical Education, Sports and Health. Volume 5(Issue 3):30-34.obadiora_and_obadiora.pdf
Obadiora, AH, Obadiora AJ.  2018.  Relationship of Age and Sports Participation to Quality of Life Among Prison Inmates in Nigeria. Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Sports. 36:32-38.my_article_online_7.pdf
Obadiora, AJ, Obadiora AH.  2019.  Factors Associated with Mass Failure among Secondary School Students in Osun State, Nigeria. Nigerian Journal Of Social Studies. 22(1):64-81.my_article_online_8.pdf
Obaedo, B, Oseghale G.  2020.  Impact of Naira Exchange Rate on Prices of Selected Construction Materials in Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria, 12. American Scientific Research Journal for Engineering, Technology, and Sciences. 74:114-123. Abstract
n/a
Obafemi, CA, Sulaimon TO, Akinpelu DA, Olugbade TA.  2006.  “Antimicrobial activity of extracts and a germacranolidetype sesquiterpene lactone from Tithonia diversifolia leaf extract”. African Journal of Biotechnology . Vol. 5(12):1254-1258.
Obafemi, CA, Taiwo FO, Iwalewa EO, Akinpelu DA.  2012.  “Synthesis, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of some 2-phenylglyoxylic acid derivatives”. International Journal of Life Science & Pharma Research. Vol. 2(2):22-36.
Obafemi, CA, Okeniyi SO, Ogunbinu OA, Olomola TO, Bamgbose JT.  2006.  “Chromatograhic Analysis, Antimicrobial and Antifungal Activities of Essential Oil Constituents Obtained from Vitellaria paradoxa”. Research J. Applied Sciences. Vol. 1(1-4):132-135.
Obasola, OI, Agunbiade OM.  2016.  Online health information seeking pattern among undergraduates in a Nigerian university. SAGE Open. 6:2158244016635255., Number 1 Abstract
n/a
Obayopo, SO, Taiwo KA, Owolarafe OK, Adio SA.  2014.  Development of a plantain slicing device. Journal of food science and technology. 51:1310–1317., Number 7: Springer Abstract
n/a
Obayopo, SO, Taiwo KA, Owolarafe OK, Adio SA.  2014.  Development of a plantain slicing device. Journal of food science and technology. 51(7):1310-1317.: Springer Abstract
n/a
Obayopo, SO, Taiwo KA, Owolarafe OK, Adio SA.  2014.  Development of a plantain slicing device. Journal of food science and technology. 51(7):1310-1317.: Springer Abstract
n/a
Obebe, OO, Aluko OO, Falohun OO, Akinlabi KB, ThankGod OE.  2020.  {Parasitic contamination and public health risk of commonly consumed vegetables in Ibadan-Nigeria}, jun. PAMJ . 2020; 36:126. 36, Number 126 AbstractWebsite

INTRODUCTION: Vegetables form a major component of the human diet. However, Poor agronomic practices may put consumers at risk of parasitic infections. This study evaluated the parasitic contamination of vegetables grown in selected farms in Ibadan, Nigeria. METHODS: Two hundred and eigthy vegetables: african eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), cucumber (Brassica oleracea), spinach (Amaranthus cruentus), white jute (Corchorus olitorius), pumpkin (Telfaria occidentalis), green pepper (Capsicum sp.), okro (Abelmoschus esculentus), quill grass (Celosia argenta L), tomato (Lycopersicum sativus) were collected from farms within Ibadan. Samples were washed in water, and the resulting washing solution was filtered and centrifuged to concentrate the parasitic stages. Sediments were examined by iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears. RESULTS: parasites were detected in 14 (5.0%, 95% CI 32.6%-67.3%) of samples. The highest contaminated vegetable was White jute 32.1 (95% CI 17.9%-50.6%), followed by pumpkin 7.1(95% CI 1.9-22.6), Quill grass 7.1% (95% CI 1.9-22.6) and lettuce 3.5 (95% CI 0.6-17.7). The commonest parasites were Strongyloides stercoralis larvae 42.9 (95% CI 21.3-67.4), Entamoeba histolytica/E.dipaar 21.4 (95% CI 7.5-47.5), Trichostrongylus spp 21.4 (95% CI 21.3-67.4), and Ascaris sp. 14.3 (95% CI 4.0-39.9). CONCLUSION: these findings provide evidence of contamination of vegetable from farms in Ibadan with parasites of public health importance. Information on best practices should be packaged and disseminated through appropriate channels to enhance positive behavioral change among farmers.

Obebe, OO, Aluko OO.  2020.  {Epidemiology of tungiasis in sub-saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis}. Pathogens and Global Health. 114:360–369., Number 7: Taylor & Francis AbstractWebsite

Tungiasis is a public health disease in many rural and urban slums in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), primarily affecting children and the elderly. Yet, this disease has received little attention in many sub-Saharan African countries. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the pooled prevalence of tungiasis and associated risk factors in SSA. We searched AJOL, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and PubMed for population-based studies that reported the prevalence of tungiasis and risk factors in SSA between January 1980 and July 2020. The study employed a random-effects model and heterogeneity to estimate the pooled prevalence and evaluate the Cochran's Q-test respectively across studies that met the inclusion criteria. We screened 104 articles and retrieved 42 full-text articles to evaluate for inclusion in the review. Twenty-seven studies involving 16,303 individuals in seven SSA countries were analyzed. The pooled prevalence of tungiasis in SSA was 33.4% (95% CI: 27.6–39.8), while tungiasis prevalence was 46.5%, 44.9%, 42.0%, 37.2%, 28.1%, 22.7% and 20.1% for Ethiopia, Cameroon, Tanzania, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, and Uganda, respectively. The risk of tungiasis was associated with gender, participants' age groups (4–15 years and ≥60 years), earthen floor, non-regular use of footwear, contact with animals, and residence in rural areas. An integrated approach addressing significant factors in tungiasis prevalence in SSA needs to be designed and implemented by a trans-disciplinary composition of community leaders, health professionals, non-governmental institutions, and policymakers.