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T.T, OLADOKUN, M.O. OYEWOLE, A.A. ODEBODE.  2009.  “Perceptual Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Facilities Management Strategies in Nigeria”. Ife Journal of Environmental Design and Management,. 4(1):93-102..
Fasokun, TO, Talla NS, Mohammed MH, Apara SAE, Ogungbe EO.  2010.  “Education as a Potent Factor for Achieving Sustainable Development in Nigeria:. Education for Sustainable Development in Nigeria Smartprint Production, Jos .
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Ajiboye, OJ, Folaranmi SA, Makinde DO.  2006.  {God as a Creative Artist: An Artistic Assessment of God's Creativity in the Bible}. Nigerian Journal of the Humanities. 13:180–191.. Abstract
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Johnson, OE, Mbada CE, Agbeja OB, Obembe AO, Awotidebe TO, Okonji AM.  2011.  [Relationship between Physical Activity and Back Extensor Muscles’ Endurance to The Risk of Low-Back Pain in School-Aged Adolescents].    TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin          . 10:4.
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Aloba, O, Akinsulore A, Mapayi B, Oloniniyi I, Mosaku K, Alimi T, Esan O.  2015.  The Yoruba version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale: psychometric characteristics and correlates of hopelessness in a sample of Nigerian psychiatric outpatients. Comprehensive psychiatry. 56:258-271.: Elsevier Abstract
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Aloba, O, Akinsulore A, Mapayi B, Oloniniyi I, Mosaku K, Alimi T, Esan O.  2015.  The Yoruba version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale: psychometric characteristics and correlates of hopelessness in a sample of Nigerian psychiatric outpatients. Comprehensive psychiatry. 56:258–271.: WB Saunders Abstract
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Taleatu, BA, OMOTOSO E, Lal C, Makinde WO, Ogundele KT, Ajenifuja E, Lasisi AR, Eleruja MA, Mola GT.  2014.  XPS and some surface characterizations of electrodeposited MgO nanostructure. Surface and Interface Analysis. 46(6):372-377.
Taleatu, BA, OMOTOSO E, Lal C, Makinde WO, Ogundele KT, Ajenifuja E, Lasisi AR, Eleruja MA, Mola GT.  2014.  XPS and some surface characterizations of electrodeposited MgO nanostructure. Surface and Interface Analysis . 46:372–377.
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Mbada, CE, Obembe AO, Alade BS, Adedoyin RA, Awotidebe TO, Johnson OE, Soremi OO.  2012.  Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders among Health Workers in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital. TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin. 11(5):583-588.
Mbada, CE, Obembe AO, Alade BS, Adedoyin RA, Awotidebe TO, Johnson OE, Soremi OO.  2012.  Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders among Health Workers in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital. TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin. 11(5):583-588.
Akinyemi, AI, Mobolaji JW, Abe JO, Ibrahim E, Ikuteyijo O.  2021.  Women Deprivation Index and Family Planning Utilisation in Urban Geography of West African Countries. Frontiers in Global Women's Health. 2:30.: Frontiers Abstract
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Mejiuni, O.  2006.  Women are Flexible and Better Managers: The Paradox of Women's Identities, their Educational Attainments and Political Power. Abstract

Through a phenomenological reading of Nigerian women’s lived experiences, I examined the processes that account for the present low level of women’s participation in civic-political affairs and I argue that: there is magic consciousness in the religions and religious practices in Nigeria; that the official and unofficial presence of the religions in formal schools ensure that the beliefs and the values of their adherents fuse with the structure of the school (through the official and the hidden curriculum) and the larger society to construct an identity for women; and that the constructed identity represents a major factor in determining whether women have political power. I conclude that the potential for challenging and reordering the status quo exists in the women who perceive themselves as different from whom men would rather they are.

Mejiuni, O.  2013.  Women and Power: Education, Religion and Identity. Abstract

Education is an important tool for the development of human potential. Organizations and individuals interested in development consider knowledge, skills and attitudes, obtained through formal, non-formal and incidental learning, as invaluable assets. Therefore, it is necessary to reflect on fundamental elements that shape the process through which education is attained: How do people learn, and what are the conditions that facilitate effective learning? Answers to these questions demonstrate that no education can be politically neutral, because there is no value-free education.

The traditional or indigenous education systems in Nigeria, which covered (and still cover) physical training, development of character, respect for elders and peers, development of intellectual skills, specific vocational trainings, developing a sense of belonging and participation in community affairs, and understanding, appreciating and promoting the cultural heritage of the community were, and are, not value-free. In other words, the goals and purpose of education, the content, the entire process and the procedures chosen for evaluation in education are all value-laden.

This book attempts to show that the teaching-learning process in higher education, and religion, taught and learned through non-formal and informal education (or the hidden curriculum), and other socialization processes within and outside the formal school system, all interface to determine the persons that women become. This education enhances or limits women’s capabilities, whether in the civic-political sphere or in their attempts to resist violence. Hence, education and religion have ways of empowering or disempowering women.

Idowu, PA, JA B, MO O, FA O.  2017.  Web-Based Surveillance System for Periodontal Disease for Nigeria. Software Engineering. 5(2):26-37.
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Muzamil, H, Duarte R, Dix-Peek T, Vachiat A, Dickens C, Grinter S, Naidoo S, Manga P, Naicker S.  2016.  Volume overload and its risk factors in South African chronic kidney disease patients: An appraisal of bioimpedance spectroscopy and inferior vena cava measurements, 06. Clinical nephrology. 86 Abstract
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Orimolade, A, Olateju S, Mejabi J, Adetoye A, Ikem I, Ayeni F, Esan O.  2018.  Variation in the Duration of Recumbency Post-spinal Anaesthesia in Relation to the Occurrence of Post-dural Puncture Headache, 10. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 12:UC09-UC12. Abstract
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Ogunmuyiwa, S, Fatusi O, I Ugboko V, Ayoola O, Maaji S.  2012.  The validity of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures, 2012/02/03. 41:500-5. Abstract

The aims of this study were to determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of ultrasonography in detecting zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures, and to highlight factors that may affect the validity of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture. Twenty-one patients with suspected fractures of the zygomaticomaxillary complex presenting at the authors' hospital were included in this prospective study. All the patients had plain radiographic and computed tomography (CT) investigations. All underwent ultrasonographic examination of the affected region using an ultrasound machine with a 7.5 MHz probe. The different radiologists were not aware of the results of the other two investigations. Statistical significance was inferred at P<0.05. The validity of ultrasonography varied with fracture sites with a sensitivity of 100% for zygomatic arch fractures, 90% for infraorbital margin fractures and 25% for frontozygomatic suture separation. Specificity was 100% for the three types of fracture. There was no statistically significant difference in the ability of CT scan and ultrasonography to diagnose fractures from various zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture sites (P=0.47). Ultrasonography has proved to be a valid tool for the diagnosis of zygomatic arch and displaced infraorbital margin fractures.

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Makinde, ON, Ade-Ojo IP.  2009.  Uterine Fibroid: A review. . Nigerian Journal of Health Sciences. 9(1):23-27.
Kuliya-Gwarzo, A, Ibegbulam OG, Mamman A, Raji AA, Akingbola TS, Mabayoje VO, Ocheni S, Tanko Y, Amusu OA, Akinyanju OO, Ndakotsu MA, Kassim DO, Arewa OP, Bolarinwa RAA, Olaniyi JA, Okocha CE, Akinola NO, Bamgbade OO, Adediran IA, Salawu L, Faluyi JO, Oyekunle AA, Okanny CC, Akanmu S, Halim DNK, Bazuaye GN, Enosolease ME, Nwauche CA, Ogbe OP, Wakama TT, Durosinmi MA.  2008.  The use of Imatinib mesylate (Glivec) in Nigerian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.. Cellular Therapy and Transplantation. 1:10.3205/ctt-2008-en-000027.01., Number 2 Abstract

Objectives: To assess response and toxicity to Imatinib mesylate (Glivec) in Nigerian Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: From August 2003 to August 2007, 98 consecutive, consenting patients, 56 (57%) males and 42 (43%) females, median age 36 years (range, 11-65 years) diagnosed with CML, irrespective of disease phase received Imatinib at a dose of 300-600mg/day at the OAU Teaching Hospitals, Nigeria. Response to therapy was assessed by clinical, haematological and cytogenetic parameters. Blood counts were checked every two weeks in the first three months of therapy. Chromosome analysis was repeated sixth monthly. Overall survival (OS) and frequency of complete or major cytogenetic remission (CCR/MCR) were evaluated. Results: Complete haematologic remission was achieved in 64% and 83% of patients at one and three months, respectively. With a median follow-up of 25 months, the rates of CCR and MCR were 59% and 35% respectively. At 12 months of follow-up, OS and progression- free survival (PFS) were 96% and 91%, respectively. Achievement of CR at six months was associated with significantly better survival (p = 0.043).Conclusions: Compared to treatment outcome with conventional chemotherapy and alpha interferon, as previously used in Nigeria, the results obtained with this regimen has established Imatinib as the first-line treatment strategy in patients with CML, as it is in other populations, with minimal morbidity.

Sarfo, FS, Ovbiagele B, Gebregziabher M, Akpa O, Akpalu A, Wahab K, Ogbole G, Akinyemi R, Obiako R, Komolafe M, Owolabi L, Lackland D, Arnett D, Tiwari H, Markus HS, Akinyemi J, Oguntade A, Fawale B, Adeoye A, Olugbo O, Ogunjimi L, Osaigbovo G, Jenkins C, Chukwuonye I, Ajose O, Oyinloye L, Mutiso F, Laryea R, Calys-Tagoe B, Salaam A, Amusa G, Olowookere S, Imoh C, Mande A, Arulogun O, Adekunle F, Appiah L, Balogun O, Singh A, Adeleye O, Ogah O, Makanjuola A, Owusu D, Kolo P, Adebayo O, Agunloye A, Shidali V, Faniyan M, Lakoh S, Diala S, Iheonye H, Efidi C, Sanya E, Sunmonu T, Akintunde A, Owolabi M.  2020.  Unraveling the risk factors for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage among West Africans, 2020. Neurology. 94(10) Abstract

ObjectiveTo characterize risk factors for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) occurrence and severity among West Africans.MethodsThe Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network (SIREN) study is a multicenter case-control study involving 15 sites in Ghana and Nigeria. Patients were adults ≥18 years old with CT-confirmed sICH with age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched stroke-free community controls. Standard instruments were used to assess vascular, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors. Factors associated with sICH and its severity were assessed using conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and population-attributable risks (PARs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors.ResultsOf 2,944 adjudicated stroke cases, 854 were intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Mean age of patients with ICH was 54.7 ± 13.9 years, with a male preponderance (63.1%), and 77.3% were nonlobar. Etiologic subtypes of sICH included hypertension (80.9%), structural vascular anomalies (4.0%), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (0.7%), systemic illnesses (0.5%), medication-related (0.4%), and undetermined (13.7%). Eight factors independently associated with sICH occurrence by decreasing order of PAR with their adjusted OR (95% CI) were hypertension, 66.63 (20.78-213.72); dyslipidemia, 2.95 (1.84-4.74); meat consumption, 1.55 (1.01-2.38); family history of CVD, 2.22 (1.41-3.50); nonconsumption of green vegetables, 3.61 (2.07-6.31); diabetes mellitus, 2.11 (1.29-3.46); stress, 1.68 (1.03-2.77); and current tobacco use, 14.27 (2.09-97.47). Factors associated with severe sICH using an NIH Stroke Scale score >15 with adjusted OR (95% CI) were nonconsumption of leafy green vegetables, 2.03 (1.43-2.88); systolic blood pressure for each mm Hg rise, 1.01 (1.00-1.01); presence of midline shift, 1.54 (1.11-2.13); lobar ICH, 1.72 (1.16-2.55); and supratentorial bleeds, 2.17 (1.06-4.46).ConclusionsPopulation-level control of the dominant factors will substantially mitigate the burden of sICH in West Africa.

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Dare, F, Adelusola A, Adetiloye V, Makinde O, Orji E.  1999.  Twin pregnancy involving complete hydatidiform mole, 05. Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 19:318-9. Abstract
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Aloba, O, Mapayi B, Akinsulore S, Ukpong D, Fatoye O.  2014.  Trust in Physician Scale: factor structure, reliability, validity and correlates of trust in a sample of Nigerian psychiatric outpatients. Asian journal of psychiatry. 11:20–27.: Elsevier Science BV Abstract
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Fatusi, AO, Adedini SA, Mobolaji JW.  2021.  Trends and correlates of girl-child marriage in 11 West African countries: evidence from recent Demographic and Health Surveys. AAS Open Research. 4: African Academy of Sciences Abstract
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Oyekunle, A, Adelasoye S, Bolarinwa R, Ayansanwo A, Aladekomo T, Mamman A, Durosinmi M.  2012.  The treatment of childhood and adolescent chronic myeloid leukaemia in Nigeria.. Journal of Pediatric Sciences. 4:1–5., Number 4 Abstract
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