Publications

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Journal Article
Orji, E, Agwu F, Loto O, Olaleye O.  2008.  A randomized comparative study of prophylactic oxytocin versus ergometrine in the third stage of labor.. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. . 101(2):129-32.
L..  2008.  The use of imatinib mesylate in Nigerians with chronic myeloid leukaemia. . Cellular Therapy and Transplantation. 1(2):58-62.
Adisa, AO, Lawal OO, Adesunkanmi ARK, others.  2008.  Paradox of wellness and nonadherence among Nigerian women on breast cancer chemotherapy. Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics. 4:107., Number 3: Medknow Publications Abstract
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Alatise, O, Lawal O, Agbakwuru A, Adesunkanmi A, Faponle AF, Dare F, Ogunniyi S, Akinola D.  2007.  Emergency Non–obstetric Abdominal Surgery in Pregnancy., 01. East and Central African Journal of Surgery (ISSN: 1024-297X) Vol 12 Num 2. 12 Abstract
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Aladesanmi, AJ, Iwalewa EO, Adebajo AC, Akinkunmi EO, Taiwo BJ, Olorunmola FO, Lamikanra A.  2007.  Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of some Nigerian Medicinal plants. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. Vol. 4(2):173-184.
O.K Owolarafe, L.A Sanni, W.A Olosunde, O.O Fadeyi, Ajibola OO.  2007.  Development of an aqueous batch extraction system for palm fruit processing.. Agricultural Mechanization in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Tokyo.. 38(4):61-66.
Ogunfowokan, AO, Mmualefe LC, Mwatseteza JF, L. B, L. C, Nindi MM, N. T.  2007.  Sample preparation for chromatography: An African perspective. Journal of Chromatography A. 1153(1-2):1-13.
Folayan, MO, Lawal B, Adejuyigbe EO, Owotade FJ, Ndukwe KC, Sunak OD.  2007.  Timing and sequence of tooth eruption in Nigerian children. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 134:443-448.
Aboderin, OA, Abdu A, Odetoyin BW, Okeke IN, Lawa OO, Ndububa DA, Agbakwuru AE, Lamikanra A.  2007.  Antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori from patients in Ile-Ife, South-west, Nigeria. African health sciences. 7, Number 3: Makerere University Medical School (Uganda) Abstract
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New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

Mosaku, KS, Fatoye FO, Komolafe M, Lawal M, Ola BA.  2006.  Quality of life and associated factors among adults with epilepsy in Nigeria, 2006. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine. 36(4) Abstract

Objective: Epilepsy is a common condition worldwide and has been observed to affect quality of life (QOL). Though, much has been written on this subject among western populations, little research has been done in developing countries of Africa including Nigeria. The study aims to identify factors associated with quality of life among adult epilepsy patients in this environment. Method: Respondents were evaluated using the 10-item Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-10), the 30-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30), the modified Mini Mental State Examination (mMMSE),and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Diagnosis of epilepsy was based on clinical and electroencephalographic findings. Results: The mean age of the 51 respondents was 27.7years (SD = 9.7). Thirteen (25.5%) had an average of 2 seizure episodes in the month preceding the interview, while 37 (72.5%) have had the condition for more than 5 years. Factors that were significantly associated with overall quality of life included being female (p < 0.05), seizure frequency (p < 0.01), using more than 1 anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) (p < 0.01), GHQ-30 score (p < 0.01), high anxiety score (p < 0.001), and high depression score p < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that depressive symptoms were the single most important factor explaining low QOL. Other factors were GHQ-30 score, seizure frequency, and being a woman. Conclusion: Controlling seizures and paying attention to the psychological needs of adult epileptics will have a positive effect on the QOL among Nigerian epileptics. © 2006, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.

B.O, A, R. FB, O OE, LA B.  2006.  Blindness and visual Impairment among the elderly in Ife -Ijesha Zone of Osun State, Nigeria. Indian Journal of Ophthalmology. 54(1):59-62.
L, S.  2006.  Clinicopathological features of Nigerians with Myelodysplastic syndromes. . European Journal of General Medicine. 3(4):173-177.15._mds_manuscript.pdf
Oluwaranti, AI, O.O. Abiona, C.E. Onime, L.O. Kehinde, and Radicella SM.  2006.  Development of a non-intrusive network traffic monitoring and analysis system. African Journal of Science and Technology. Vol. 7, No. 2, December 2006(Addis Ababa, Ethiopia):pp.54-69. Abstract

The growth in the use of World Wide Web (WWW) in the Internet has caused a significant
increase in the type and volume of network traffic. Presently, there is complete reliance on computer
networks by most enterprise, hence the importance of network traffic monitoring and analysis can
not be over emphasized. Most of the existing traffic monitoring and analysis tools are only capable
of measuring traffic loads on individual network segments and servers generating such traffic.
Nowadays, there is exponential increase in Intranet to Internet traffic due to www and other
applications, the need to determine which host or application is generating the most traffic is
crucial and important in managing limited network resources efficiently.This paper presents an
approach to monitoring Intranet to Internet traffic through the development of a non intrusive
network traffic monitoring and analysis system. The experimental aims include being able to monitor
live network traffic without adversely imparting on performance and also to identify and monitor
traffic patterns (both speed and volume) on the basis of host (IP address), protocol and time of the
day. This work builds on a previous work with a limitation to monitoring network traffic in a
switched environment.The setup presented in this paper meets with the above aims and has been in
use at the Obafemi Awolowo University, since April 2003. The monitoring interface was placed in
promiscuous mode, and a Perl wrapper script was used to start the IP Network Monitoring Software
(IPTraf) with suitable argument, to gather detailed interface statistics information and also produce
suitable log files used by Multi Router Traffic Grapher (MRTG) to generate graphical overview and
Webalizer to generate detailed analysis. Other scripts used are Run_mrtg, used to run MRTG via a
crontab. Mrtg_reader was used to read and clear the counter file. Run_webalizer was used to run
Webalizer via a crontab, and Webalizer_caller was used to Calls Webalizer to process the file, with
input file and output directory specified. The MRTG graph shows usage pattern, network downtime,
peak and saturation periods. While the Webalizer shows detailed statistical information about the
total packets and kilobytes transferred on an hourly, daily and monthly basis. The paper explains
how it has been implemented at the Obafemi Awolowo University campus network and the
requirements – software and hardware to install such a system on any network.

Olabanji, JK, Onayemi O, Olayinka A, Olasode O, Lawal A-R.  2005.  Keloids: An old problem still searching for a solution. . Surgical Practice.. 9(1):2-7.
Omoleke, II, L. B.  2005.  Legal and Socio-Economic Implications of Privatising Energy Enterprises in Africa. Lesotho Law Journal. 15(1):97-140.
L, sa.  2005.  Leishmaniasis presenting as severe anaemia in an adult female Nigerian. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology. 6(3):253-255.11._leishmaniasis_manuscript.pdf
Windsor, HM, Abioye-Kuteyi EA, Leber JM, Morrow SD, Bulsara MK, Marshall BJ.  2005.  Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Indigenous Western Australians: comparison between urban and remote rural populations.. Medical Journa of Australia. 182(5):210-213.
Olldashi, F, Muzha I, Filipi N, Lede R, Copertari P, Traverso C, Copertari A, Vergara EA, Montenegro C, De Huidobro RR et al..  2004.  Effect of intravenous corticosteroids on death within 14 days in 10008 adults with clinically significant head injury (MRC CRASH trial): Randomised placebo-controlled trial, 2004. The Lancet. 364(9442) Abstract

Background Corticosteroids have been used to treat head injuries for more than 30 years. In 1997, findings of a systematic review suggested that these drugs reduce risk of death by 1-2%. The CRASH trial—a multicentre international collaboration—aimed to confirm or refute such an effect by recruiting 20 000 patients. In May, 2004, the data monitoring committee disclosed the unmasked results to the steering committee, which stopped recruitment. Methods 10 008 adults with head injury and a Glasgow coma score (GCS) of 14 or less within 8 h of injury were randomly allocated 48 h infusion of corticosteroids (methylprednisolone) or placebo. Primary outcomes were death within 2 weeks of injury and death or disability at 6 months. Prespecified subgroup analyses were based on injury severity (GCS) at randomisation and on time from injury to randomisation. Analysis was by intention to treat. Effects on outcomes within 2 weeks of randomisation are presented in this report. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN74459797. Findings Compared with placebo, the risk of death from all causes within 2 weeks was higher in the group allocated corticosteroids (1052 [21·1%] vs 893 [17·9%] deaths; relative risk 1·18 [95% CI 1·09-1·27]; p=0·0001). The relative increase in deaths due to corticosteroids did not differ by injury severity (p=0·22) or time since injury (p=0·05). Interpretation Our results show there is no reduction in mortality with methylprednisolone in the 2 weeks after head injury. The cause of the rise in risk of death within 2 weeks is unclear.

Faborode, MO, Owolarafe OK, Lasisi AA, Kasali SA, Oguntuase KS.  2003.  Techno-economic assessment of seed oil-palm extraction in some selected states Nigeria.. Technovation. 23(6):545-553.