Publications

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2009
Aboderin, OA, Abdu A-R, Odetoyin BW, Lamikanra A.  2009.  Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli strains from urinary tract infections. Journal of the national medical association. 101:1268–1273., Number 12: Elsevier Abstract
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Aboderin, OA, Abdu A-R, Odetoyin BW, Lamikanra A.  2009.  Antimicrobial {{Resistance}} in {{Escherichia}} Coli {{Strains From Urinary Tract Infections}}. Journal of the National Medical Association. 101:1268–1273., Number 12: {Elsevier} Abstract

Background: An increase in resistance against many different drugs among urinary tract infection (UTI) E coli isolates has been observed in the last 2 decades. This study determined the trends of antimicrobial resistance in E coli to commonly used antibiotics. Methods: The study was conducted in Ile-Ife, southwest Nigeria. Patients with features suggestive of UTI were investigated for presence of significant bacteriuria. Urine isolates were identified. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated in accordance with standard bacteriological methods. Results: Of 442 urine specimens, 158 (35.8%) yielded significant growth, including 41 (25.6%) with E coli. Among the E coli isolates, antimicrobial susceptibility varied in prevalence by agent in descending order as follows: nitrofurantoin (80%), ofloxacin (24%), ciprofloxacin (15%), nalidixic acid (10%), cotrimoxazole (5%), and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (2%). No isolate was susceptible to amoxicillin, gentamicin, or tetracycline. All were also found to be resistant to at least 3 commonly used drugs. All 25 isolates tested for extendedspectrum ß -lactamase (ESBC) production were found to be presumptive ESBCs producers. Conclusion: The results demonstrate the continued susceptibility of E coli to nitrofurantoin and their widespread and increasing resistance to amoxicillin, gentamicin, cotrimoxazole, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and tetracycline. Nitrofurantoin is a— and, in this locale, perhaps the only— rational drug for empiric treatment of uncomplicated UTI. There is a need for a comprehensive study of the involvement of ESBC-producing E coli in UTI in this environment.

2008
De Vries(nci, J, Murtomaa H, Butler(com M, Cherrett(nci H, Ferrillo(nci P, Ferro M, Gadbury-Amyot C, Haden K, Manogue M, Mintz J, E. Mulvihill(nci J, Murray(nci B, Nattestad A, Nielsen(nci D, Ogunbodede E, Parkash H, Plasschaert(nci F, T. Reed(nci M, L. Rupp(com R, Shanley(nci D.  2008.  The Global Network on Dental Education: a new vision for IFDEA, 2008/02/15. European Journal of Dental Education. 12:167-175. Abstract

The advent of globalization has changed our perspectives radically. It presents increased understanding of world affairs, new challenges and exciting opportunities. The inequitable distribution and use of finite energy resources and global warming are just two examples of challenges that can only be addressed by concerted international collaboration. Globalization has become an increasingly important influence on dentistry and dental education. The International Federation for Dental Educators and Associations (IFDEA) welcomes the challenges it now faces as a player in a complex multifaceted global community. This report addresses the new circumstances in which IFDEA must operate, taking account of the recommendations made by other working groups. The report reviews the background and evolution of IFDEA and describes the extensive developments that have taken place in IFDEA over the past year with the introductions of a new Constitution and Bylaws overseen by a newly established Board of Directors. These were the consequence of a new mission, goals and objectives for IFDEA. An expanded organization is planned using http://www.IFDEA.org as the primary instrument to facilitate the exchange of knowledge, programmes and expertise between colleagues and federated associations throughout the world, thereby promoting higher standards in oral health through education in low-, middle- and high-income countries of the world. Such aspirations are modified by the reality and enormity of poverty-related global ill health.

Perel, PA, Olldashi F, Muzha I, Filipi N, Lede R, Copertari P, Traverso C, Copertari A, Vergara EA, Montenegro C et al..  2008.  Predicting outcome after traumatic brain injury: Practical prognostic models based on large cohort of international patients, 2008. BMJ. 336(7641) Abstract

Objective: To develop and validate practical prognostic models for death at 14 days and for death or severe disability six months after traumatic brain injury. Design: Multivariable logistic regression to select variables that were independently associated with two patient outcomes. Two models designed: "basic" model (demographic and clinical variables only) and "CT" model (basic model plus results of computed tomography). The models were subsequently developed for high and low-middle income countries separately. Setting: Medical Research Council (MRC) CRASH Trial. Subjects: 10 008 patients with traumatic brain injury. Models externally validated in a cohort of 8509. Results: The basic model included four predictors: age, Glasgow coma scale, pupil reactivity, and the presence of major extracranial injury. The CT model also included the presence of petechial haemorrhages, obliteration of the third ventricle or basal cisterns, subarachnoid bleeding, midline shift, and non-evacuated haematoma. In the derivation sample the models showed excellent discrimination (C statistic above 0.80). The models showed good calibration graphically. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test also indicated good calibration, except for the CT model in low-middle income countries. External validation for unfavourable outcome at six months in high income countries showed that basic and CT models had good discrimination (C statistic 0.77 for both models) but poorer calibration. Conclusion: Simple prognostic models can be used to obtain valid predictions of relevant outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury.

Alatise, O, Lawal O, Adesunkanmi A, Agbakwuru A, Adisa A, Arigbabu A, Akinola D.  2008.  Colorectal cancer, 06. Journal of the Obafemi Awolowo University Medical Student's Association (IFEMED). 13 Abstract
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Orji, EO, Olaleye AO, Loto OM, Ogunniyi SO.  2008.  A randomised controlled trial of uterine exteriorisation and non-exteriorisation at caesarean section.. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol.. 48(6):570-4.
Orji, E, Agwu F, Loto O, Olaleye O.  2008.  A randomized comparative study of prophylactic oxytocin versus ergometrine in the third stage of labor.. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. . 101(2):129-32.
Adisa, AO, Lawal OO, Adesunkanmi ARK, others.  2008.  Paradox of wellness and nonadherence among Nigerian women on breast cancer chemotherapy. Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics. 4:107., Number 3: Medknow Publications Abstract
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2007
Alatise, O, Lawal O, Agbakwuru A, Adesunkanmi A, Faponle AF, Dare F, Ogunniyi S, Akinola D.  2007.  Emergency Non–obstetric Abdominal Surgery in Pregnancy., 01. East and Central African Journal of Surgery (ISSN: 1024-297X) Vol 12 Num 2. 12 Abstract
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Aladesanmi, AJ, Iwalewa EO, Adebajo AC, Akinkunmi EO, Taiwo BJ, Olorunmola FO, Lamikanra A.  2007.  Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of some Nigerian Medicinal plants. Afr. J. Trad. CAM. Vol. 4(2):173-184.
Aladesanmi, AJ, Iwalewa EO, Adebajo AC, Akinkunmi EO, Taiwo BJ, Olorunmola FO, Lamikanra A.  2007.  ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF SOME NIGERIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS. Afr. J. Trad. CAM. Vol. 4(2):173-184.
Aladesanmi, AJ, Iwalewa EO, Akinkunmi EO, Taiwo BJ, Olorunmola FO, Lamikanra A.  2007.  ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF SOME NIGERIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS. Afr. J. Trad. CAM. Vol. 4(2):000-000.
O.K Owolarafe, L.A Sanni, W.A Olosunde, O.O Fadeyi, Ajibola OO.  2007.  Development of an aqueous batch extraction system for palm fruit processing.. Agricultural Mechanization in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Tokyo.. 38(4):61-66.
Ogunfowokan, AO, Mmualefe LC, Mwatseteza JF, L. B, L. C, Nindi MM, N. T.  2007.  Sample preparation for chromatography: An African perspective. Journal of Chromatography A. 1153(1-2):1-13.
Folayan, MO, Lawal B, Adejuyigbe EO, Owotade FJ, Ndukwe KC, Sunak OD.  2007.  Timing and sequence of tooth eruption in Nigerian children. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 134:443-448.
Aboderin, OA, Abdu A, Odetoyin BW, Okeke IN, Lawa OO, Ndububa DA, Agbakwuru AE, Lamikanra A.  2007.  Antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori from patients in Ile-Ife, South-west, Nigeria. African health sciences. 7, Number 3: Makerere University Medical School (Uganda) Abstract
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2006
New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

Mosaku, KS, Fatoye FO, Komolafe M, Lawal M, Ola BA.  2006.  Quality of life and associated factors among adults with epilepsy in Nigeria, 2006. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine. 36(4) Abstract

Objective: Epilepsy is a common condition worldwide and has been observed to affect quality of life (QOL). Though, much has been written on this subject among western populations, little research has been done in developing countries of Africa including Nigeria. The study aims to identify factors associated with quality of life among adult epilepsy patients in this environment. Method: Respondents were evaluated using the 10-item Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-10), the 30-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30), the modified Mini Mental State Examination (mMMSE),and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Diagnosis of epilepsy was based on clinical and electroencephalographic findings. Results: The mean age of the 51 respondents was 27.7years (SD = 9.7). Thirteen (25.5%) had an average of 2 seizure episodes in the month preceding the interview, while 37 (72.5%) have had the condition for more than 5 years. Factors that were significantly associated with overall quality of life included being female (p < 0.05), seizure frequency (p < 0.01), using more than 1 anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) (p < 0.01), GHQ-30 score (p < 0.01), high anxiety score (p < 0.001), and high depression score p < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that depressive symptoms were the single most important factor explaining low QOL. Other factors were GHQ-30 score, seizure frequency, and being a woman. Conclusion: Controlling seizures and paying attention to the psychological needs of adult epileptics will have a positive effect on the QOL among Nigerian epileptics. © 2006, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.

B.O, A, R. FB, O OE, LA B.  2006.  Blindness and visual Impairment among the elderly in Ife -Ijesha Zone of Osun State, Nigeria. Indian Journal of Ophthalmology. 54(1):59-62.
Oluwaranti, AI, O.O. Abiona, C.E. Onime, L.O. Kehinde, and Radicella SM.  2006.  Development of a non-intrusive network traffic monitoring and analysis system. African Journal of Science and Technology. Vol. 7, No. 2, December 2006(Addis Ababa, Ethiopia):pp.54-69. Abstract

The growth in the use of World Wide Web (WWW) in the Internet has caused a significant
increase in the type and volume of network traffic. Presently, there is complete reliance on computer
networks by most enterprise, hence the importance of network traffic monitoring and analysis can
not be over emphasized. Most of the existing traffic monitoring and analysis tools are only capable
of measuring traffic loads on individual network segments and servers generating such traffic.
Nowadays, there is exponential increase in Intranet to Internet traffic due to www and other
applications, the need to determine which host or application is generating the most traffic is
crucial and important in managing limited network resources efficiently.This paper presents an
approach to monitoring Intranet to Internet traffic through the development of a non intrusive
network traffic monitoring and analysis system. The experimental aims include being able to monitor
live network traffic without adversely imparting on performance and also to identify and monitor
traffic patterns (both speed and volume) on the basis of host (IP address), protocol and time of the
day. This work builds on a previous work with a limitation to monitoring network traffic in a
switched environment.The setup presented in this paper meets with the above aims and has been in
use at the Obafemi Awolowo University, since April 2003. The monitoring interface was placed in
promiscuous mode, and a Perl wrapper script was used to start the IP Network Monitoring Software
(IPTraf) with suitable argument, to gather detailed interface statistics information and also produce
suitable log files used by Multi Router Traffic Grapher (MRTG) to generate graphical overview and
Webalizer to generate detailed analysis. Other scripts used are Run_mrtg, used to run MRTG via a
crontab. Mrtg_reader was used to read and clear the counter file. Run_webalizer was used to run
Webalizer via a crontab, and Webalizer_caller was used to Calls Webalizer to process the file, with
input file and output directory specified. The MRTG graph shows usage pattern, network downtime,
peak and saturation periods. While the Webalizer shows detailed statistical information about the
total packets and kilobytes transferred on an hourly, daily and monthly basis. The paper explains
how it has been implemented at the Obafemi Awolowo University campus network and the
requirements – software and hardware to install such a system on any network.

2005
Owotade, F, Ogunbodede E, Lawal AA.  2005.  Oral Diseases in the Elderly, A Study in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, 2005/03/01. Journal of Social Sciences. 10:105-110. Abstract

To highlight oral diseases found in an elderly Nigerian population. The records of 494 elderly patients were retrospectively reviewed. The presenting complaints, relevant extraoral and intraoral findings, clinical diagnosis and investigations carried out were recorded. The ages ranged from 55 years to 120 years with almost half (44.0%) in the 60 to 69 year age group. Pain was the commonest presenting complaint (66.2%). Attrition was present in only 8% and was not related to age or sex. Coronal and root surface caries was present in 12.8% and 0.8% respectively and caries was significantly commoner in females and those who were presenting for the first time (p<0.05 and 0.01 respectively). Chronic periodontitis was the most prevalent oral disease (73.9%) and appeared to worsen with age, and decline with the state of the oral hygiene (p<0.05). Denture sore mouth was present in only females (p<0.01). Majority of the elderly (96.0%) had more than 20 teeth while only 16(3.2%) were edentulous. Squamous cell carcinoma was found in 11 patients and it affected significantly more males than females (p<0.05). Significant differences exist in the pattern of oral diseases in Nigeria when compared with the findings in other countries. Such differences might be due to socio-cultural, genetic and environmental factors.