Publications

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Submitted
Oke, MO, Martins O, Idowu OA, Fabiyi FD.  Submitted.  DETERMINATION OF RAINFALL - RECHARGE RELATIONSHIP IN ONA RIVER BASIN USING SOIL MOISTURE BALANCE METHOD. Ife Journal of Science. 16(2)oke_mo_et_al_9.pdf
Komolafe, OO, Arawomo GAO, Idowu EO, Adedeji AA.  Submitted.  STATUS AND ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE FISHERIES OF OSINMO RESERVOIR, EJIGBO, NIGERIA.. Ife Journal of Science. 16(2)komolafe_et_al_15.pdf
Ighalo, JI, C. A. Ajayi, and others.  Submitted.  Valuation of University Properties for Insurance Purposes..
Nwhator, SO, Uhunmwangho I, B. C, Ikponmwosa O.  Submitted.  Aggressive periodontitis in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice. 15:518–522., Number 4 Abstract
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Ayanbadejo, PO, Nwhator SO, Umeizudike KA, Isiavwe AR.  Submitted.  Awareness on the effect of periodontitis on glycemic control in type 2 diabetics: A pilot survey. New Nigerian Journal of Clinical Research. 2:210–216., Number 3 Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Isiekwe GI, Soroye MO, Agbaje MO.  Submitted.  Bad-breath: perceptions and misconceptions of Nigerian adults. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. 18:670–676., Number 5 Abstract
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Ige, OO, Shittu MD, Oluwasegun KM, Olorunniwo OE, Umoru LE.  Submitted.  ECO-FRIENDLY INHIBITORS FOR EROSION-CORROSION MITIGATION OF API-X65STEELIN CO2ENVIRONMENT. Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Olatosi O, Ashiwaju MO, Isiekwe GI.  Submitted.  Emerging trends in dental specialty choice in Nigeria. International Dental Journal. 63:91–96., Number 2 Abstract
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Nwhator, SO, Ijarogbe O, Agbaje O, Olojede CO, Olatunji AB.  Submitted.  Nigerian dentists’ knowledge of aggressive periodontitis. Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology. 18:78–81., Number 1, INDIA Abstract
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Idowu, EA, Afolabi AO, Nwhator SO.  Submitted.  Oral health knowledge and practice of 12 to 14-year-old Almajiris in Nigeria: A problem of definition and a call to action. Journal of Public Health Policy. 37:226–243., Number 2, UNITED STATES OF Abstract
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Idowu, EA, Afolabi AO, Nwhator SO.  Submitted.  Oral hygiene status, practices and awareness of medium security prison inmates in northeastern Nigeria. EC Dental Science. 18:491–501. Abstract
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Odeyemi, TI, Igwebueze GU, Abati OO, Ogundotun AO.  Submitted.  Political hibernation in-between elections? Exploring the online communication and mobilisation capacities of Nigeria's political parties Journal of Public Affairs. n/a:e2804., Number n/a AbstractWebsite

A noteworthy limitation among existing studies on the use of online technologies by political parties is the focus on elections. This study extends the frontiers by examining the extent to which Nigeria's political parties use their websites, as well as Facebook and Twitter platforms to communicate and mobilise citizens during and beyond elections. Using web assessment survey, data collected from the online platforms of registered political parties in February 2015 and February 2017 were analysed—to see trends in online activities during (2015 elections) and outside of elections (2017). The study reveals that the parties are caught in the web of the contradictory possibilities of digital engagement. On the one hand, is an online quiescence in the period between elections, which is premised on poor party institutionalisation. On the other hand, the parties are largely unable to reverse elements of institutionalisation challenges by leveraging digital tools to develop roots in the society and boost their public image. This quandary helps to demonstrate where the Nigerian party system fits in the equalisation versus normalisation debate on the utility of digital tools.

Nwhator, SO, Olojede CO, Ijarogbe O, Agbaje MO.  Submitted.  Self-assessed dental health knowledge of Nigerian doctors. East African Medical Journal. 90:147–155., Number 5 Abstract
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2022
Ayoola, TJ, Inneh EG, Obokoh LO, Kolawole PE, Adeoye ET.  2022.  Competition and efficiency in an oligopolistic audit market: Evidence from the Nigerian banking industry. Banks and Bank Systems. 17(4):129-139.bbs_2022_04_ayoola.pdf
Ayoola, TJ, Inneh EG, Obokoh LO, Kolawole PE, Adeoye ET.  2022.  Competition and efficiency in an oligopolistic audit market: Evidence from the Nigerian banking industry. Banks and Bank Systems. 17(4):129-139.bbs_2022_04_ayoola.pdf
Adeniran, JO, Jaiyeola TG, Idowu KA.  2022.  On some characterizations of generalized Bol loops. 41(4):805-823.
2021
Paulson, K, Kamath A, Alam T, Bienhoff K, Abady G, Abbas J, Abbasi-Kangevari M, Abbastabar H, Abd-Allah F, Abd-Elsalam S, Abdoli A, Abedi A, Abolhassani H, Guimarães Abreu L, Abu-Gharbieh E, Abu-Rmeileh N, I. Abushouk A, Adamu A, Adebayo O.  2021.  Global, regional, and national progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 3.2 for neonatal and child health: all-cause and cause-specific mortality findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019, 2021/08/31. 398 Abstract
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Folayan, M, Olanrewaju I, Brown B, El Tantawi M, Uzochukwu B, Ezechi O, M. Aly N, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ayoola O, Osamika B, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Nguyen A.  2021.  Differences in COVID-19 Preventive Behavior and Food Insecurity by HIV Status in Nigeria, 2021/08/13. :3. Abstract
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Folayan, M, Olanrewaju I, Brown B, El Tantawi M, Uzochukwu B, Ezechi O, M. Aly N, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ayoola O, Osamika B, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Nguyen A.  2021.  Differences in COVID-19 Preventive Behavior and Food Insecurity by HIV Status in Nigeria, 2021/08/13. :3. Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess if there were significant differences in the adoption of COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors and experience of food insecurity by people living with and without HIV in Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study that recruited a convenience sample of 4471 (20.5% HIV positive) adults in Nigeria. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to test the associations between the explanatory variable (HIV positive and non-positive status) and the outcome variables-COVID-19 related behavior changes (physical distancing, isolation/quarantine, working remotely) and food insecurity (hungry but did not eat, cut the size of meals/skip meals) controlling for age, sex at birth, COVID-19 status, and medical status of respondents. Significantly fewer people living with HIV (PLWH) reported a positive COVID-19 test result; and had lower odds of practicing COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors. In comparison with those living without HIV, PLWH had higher odds of cutting meal sizes as a food security measure (AOR: 3.18; 95% CI 2.60-3.88) and lower odds of being hungry and not eating (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI 0.20-0.30). In conclusion, associations between HIV status, COVID-19 preventive behaviors and food security are highly complex and warrant further in-depth to unravel the incongruities identified.

Folayan, M, Ibigbami O, Brown B, El Tantawi M, Uzochukwu B, Ezechi O, M. Aly N, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ayoola O, Osamika B, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Nguyen A.  2021.  Differences in COVID-19 Preventive Behavior and Food Insecurity by HIV Status in Nigeria, 2021/08/13. :3. Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess if there were significant differences in the adoption of COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors and experience of food insecurity by people living with and without HIV in Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study that recruited a convenience sample of 4471 (20.5% HIV positive) adults in Nigeria. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to test the associations between the explanatory variable (HIV positive and non-positive status) and the outcome variables-COVID-19 related behavior changes (physical distancing, isolation/quarantine, working remotely) and food insecurity (hungry but did not eat, cut the size of meals/skip meals) controlling for age, sex at birth, COVID-19 status, and medical status of respondents. Significantly fewer people living with HIV (PLWH) reported a positive COVID-19 test result; and had lower odds of practicing COVID-19 risk preventive behaviors. In comparison with those living without HIV, PLWH had higher odds of cutting meal sizes as a food security measure (AOR: 3.18; 95% CI 2.60-3.88) and lower odds of being hungry and not eating (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI 0.20-0.30). In conclusion, associations between HIV status, COVID-19 preventive behaviors and food security are highly complex and warrant further in-depth to unravel the incongruities identified.

Ameye, S, Ikoko M, Awoleye M, Eziyi J.  2021.  Evaluation of the performance of machine learning algorithms applied to voice parameters in prioritizing candidate for office laryngoscopy: Automated triaging in focus, 2021/07/30. 11:169-175. Abstract

Background: We examined the performance of different Machine Learning Algorithms while also comparing two methods of voice assessment to look at the workability of automating triage of patient that will need prompt office laryngoscopy. Methods: We recruited consecutive adult subjects excluding those with a history of being regular singers or choristers in the past one year and those with the previous history of laryngeal trauma. We then carried out the perceptual voice assessments on the GRBAS Scale and also obtained the basic acoustic parameters of the voice samples. Laryngeal examinations with 70-degree Hopkins’ Rod were then carried out by another examiner for all the participants to identify gross laryngeal changes or lesions. We then evaluated each machine learning algorithm comparing the perceptual and acoustic parameters in determining how well each algorithm predicts the presence of those categorized with having lesion or not by the laryngeal examination. Results: One hundred and twenty respondents were analyzed out of which 89(74.2%) were females. The mean age was 46.5 ± 9.2 years. The perceptual evaluation generally outperformed the acoustic evaluation. Also, the Naïve Bayes Classifier (NBC) outperformed other algorithms with a F1 score of 0.55 followed by Artificial Neural Network (ANN) with the score of 0.53. However, the ANN outperformed the other with regards to the Area-under-the-curve (AUC). Conclusion: When these metrics are taken together, the ANN still remains the best algorithm for this dataset. We are however cognisance of the needed improvement to the various aspects of this work including a larger dataset more scientific sampling.

Folayan, M, Olanrewaju I, El Tantawi M, Brown B, M. Aly N, Ezechi O, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Al-Khanati N, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Lawal F, Lusher J, Nguyen A.  2021.  Factors Associated with Financial Security, Food Security and Quality of Daily Lives of Residents in Nigeria during the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic, 2021/07/27. 18:7925. Abstract
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Folayan, M, Ibigbami O, El Tantawi M, Brown B, M. Aly N, Ezechi O, Abeldaño G, Ara E, Ayanore M, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Al-Khanati N, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi A, Jafer M, Khan A, Khalid Z, Lawal F, Lusher J, Nguyen A.  2021.  Factors Associated with Financial Security, Food Security and Quality of Daily Lives of Residents in Nigeria during the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic, 2021/07/27. 18:7925. Abstract

An online survey was conducted to identify factors associated with financial insecurity, food insecurity and poor quality of daily lives of adults in Nigeria during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The associations between the outcome (experience of financial loss, changes in food intake and impact of the pandemic on daily lives) and the explanatory (age, sex, education level, anxiety, depression, HIV status) variables were determined using logistic regression analysis. Of the 4439 respondents, 2487 (56.0%) were financially insecure, 907 (20.4%) decreased food intake and 4029 (90.8%) had their daily life negatively impacted. Males (AOR:0.84), people who felt depressed (AOR:0.62) and people living with HIV -PLHIV- (AOR:0.70) had significantly lower odds of financial insecurity. Older respondents (AOR:1.01) had significantly higher odds of financial insecurity. Those depressed (AOR:0.62) and PLHIV (AOR:0.55) had significantly lower odds of reporting decreased food intake. Respondents who felt anxious (AOR:0.07), depressed (AOR: 0.48) and who were PLHIV (AOR:0.68) had significantly lower odds of reporting a negative impact of the pandemic on their daily lives. We concluded the study findings may reflect a complex relationship between financial insecurity, food insecurity, poor quality of life, mental health, and socioeconomic status of adults living in Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jegede, T, Tunde-Ayinmode M, Jegede T, Akinsulore A, Ibigbami O.  2021.  Bullying Behavior Roles and Mental Health Correlates Among Secondary School Students in Ilesa, Nigeria, 2021/07/01. Abstract

Objective: Bullying behaviour is pervasive, cuts across age group, transcends geographical location and its impacts include but not limited to physical or academic snags. The objective of the study is to determine bullying roles and their association with emotional or behavioural problems among adolescents in Ilesa, Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 432 senior secondary school students (12-18 years old) in Ilesa (Nigeria). Peer Relationship Questionnaire was used to determine bullying roles and the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire to measure behavioural problems. Results: Prevalence of bullying behaviour is high. The bully-victims had the highest means score on all subscales except pro-social. Similarly, the bully-victims was significantly associated with all subscales of the SDQ except the pro-social problems at (P< .001), (P=.024), (P= .004), (P= .004), and (P< .001) for conduct, emotional problem, hyperactivity problem, peer relationship problem and the total difficulty score respectively. Conclusion: This shows that participating in bullying behaviour irrespective of the role played increases the likelihood of psychological consequences, especially the bully-victim. There is a need to establish anti-bullying programs in schools to curb this menace and its mental health consequence.