Publications

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1989
Akinola, D, Hamed A.  1989.  Fistula in ano in Nigerians, 07. Tropical gastroenterology : official journal of the Digestive Diseases Foundation. 10:153-7. Abstract
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1991
Aladesanmi, AJ, Hoffmann JJ.  1991.  Grindelane Derivatives by Microbial Transformation, Phytochemistry. 30:1847-1848.
1993
Balogun, MO, Omotoso AB, Bell E, Lip GYH, Gemill JD, Hogg KJ, Dunn FG.  1993.  An audit of emergency echocardiography in a district general hospital. International Journal of Cardiology. 41:65-68.
1996
He, K, Timmermann BN, Aladesanmi AJ, Zeng L.  1996.  A Biflavonoid from Dysoxylum lenticellare Gillespie, Phytochemistry. 42:1199-1201.
2000
Raji, Y, Hammed AI, Adesanwo JK, Ogunwande IA.  2000.  Antiulcerogenic Effects of Tylophora conspicua in Male Rats. PHYTOTHERAPY RESEARCH. 14:378–380. Phytotherapy Research
2004
Olldashi, F, Muzha I, Filipi N, Lede R, Copertari P, Traverso C, Copertari A, Vergara EA, Montenegro C, De Huidobro RR et al..  2004.  Effect of intravenous corticosteroids on death within 14 days in 10008 adults with clinically significant head injury (MRC CRASH trial): Randomised placebo-controlled trial, 2004. The Lancet. 364(9442) Abstract

Background Corticosteroids have been used to treat head injuries for more than 30 years. In 1997, findings of a systematic review suggested that these drugs reduce risk of death by 1-2%. The CRASH trial—a multicentre international collaboration—aimed to confirm or refute such an effect by recruiting 20 000 patients. In May, 2004, the data monitoring committee disclosed the unmasked results to the steering committee, which stopped recruitment. Methods 10 008 adults with head injury and a Glasgow coma score (GCS) of 14 or less within 8 h of injury were randomly allocated 48 h infusion of corticosteroids (methylprednisolone) or placebo. Primary outcomes were death within 2 weeks of injury and death or disability at 6 months. Prespecified subgroup analyses were based on injury severity (GCS) at randomisation and on time from injury to randomisation. Analysis was by intention to treat. Effects on outcomes within 2 weeks of randomisation are presented in this report. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN74459797. Findings Compared with placebo, the risk of death from all causes within 2 weeks was higher in the group allocated corticosteroids (1052 [21·1%] vs 893 [17·9%] deaths; relative risk 1·18 [95% CI 1·09-1·27]; p=0·0001). The relative increase in deaths due to corticosteroids did not differ by injury severity (p=0·22) or time since injury (p=0·05). Interpretation Our results show there is no reduction in mortality with methylprednisolone in the 2 weeks after head injury. The cause of the rise in risk of death within 2 weeks is unclear.

2005
Akanmu, MA, Olayiwola G, Ukponmwan OE, Honda K.  2005.  Acute Toxicity and Sleep-wake eeg Analysis of Stachtarpheta Cayennensis (Verbenaceae) in Rodents. Afr. J. Trad. CAM. Vol. 2(3):222-232.
i. Falade, OS, O O, Harwood CE, Adewusi SRA.  2005.  Chemical Composition and Starch Hydrolysis of Acacia-colei and Acacia-tumida Seeds. Cereal Chemistry. 82(5):479-484.1.pdf
Peterson, J, Dwyer J, Bhagwat S, Haytowitz D, Holden J, Eldridge A, Beecher G, Aladesanmi AJ.  2005.  Major flavonoids in dry tea. J.Food Composition and Analysis. 18:487-501.
Akanmu, MA, Honda K.  2005.  Selective stimulation of orexin receptor type 2 promotes wakefulness in freely behaving rats . Journal of Brain research. 1048:138-145.
2006
Osasona, CO, Hyland ADC.  2006.  Colonial Architecture in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. , Ibadan: Bookbuilders Editions Africa
New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

New, M, Hewitson B, Stephenson D, Tsiga A, Kruger A, Manhique A, Gomez B, Coelho S, Masisi D, Kululanga E, Mbambalala E, Adesina F, Saleh H, Kanyanga JK, Adosi J, Bulane L, Fortunata L, Mdoka M, Lajoie R.  2006.  Evidence of trends in daily climate extremes over southern and west Africa, 2006/07/27. 111 Abstract

[ 1] There has been a paucity of information on trends in daily climate and climate extremes, especially from developing countries. We report the results of the analysis of daily temperature ( maximum and minimum) and precipitation data from 14 south and west African countries over the period 1961 - 2000. Data were subject to quality control and processing into indices of climate extremes for release to the global community. Temperature extremes show patterns consistent with warming over most of the regions analyzed, with a large proportion of stations showing statistically significant trends for all temperature indices. Over 1961 to 2000, the regionally averaged occurrence of extreme cold ( fifth percentile) days and nights has decreased by - 3.7 and - 6.0 days/decade, respectively. Over the same period, the occurrence of extreme hot (95th percentile) days and nights has increased by 8.2 and 8.6 days/decade, respectively. The average duration of warm ( cold) has increased ( decreased) by 2.4 (0.5) days/decade and warm spells. Overall, it appears that the hot tails of the distributions of daily maximum temperature have changed more than the cold tails; for minimum temperatures, hot tails show greater changes in the NW of the region, while cold tails have changed more in the SE and east. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) does not exhibit a consistent trend across the region, with many neighboring stations showing opposite trends. However, the DTR shows consistent increases in a zone across Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique, coinciding with more rapid increases in maximum temperature than minimum temperature extremes. Most precipitation indices do not exhibit consistent or statistically significant trends across the region. Regionally averaged total precipitation has decreased but is not statistically significant. At the same time, there has been a statistically significant increase in regionally averaged daily rainfall intensity and dry spell duration. While the majority of stations also show increasing trends for these two indices, only a few of these are statistically significant. There are increasing trends in regionally averaged rainfall on extreme precipitation days and in maximum annual 5-day and 1-day rainfall, but only trends for the latter are statistically significant.

2007
Desa, E, Berque J, Odido M, Mazzilli, S., Holland, G., Hoguane A., Ittekkot, V., Kayak, S., Salami, A. T., Torres PO.  2007.  The Business of Capacity-Development, In: UN Group on Earth Observations (ed),. (The Full Picture, Tudor Rose, Geneva):pp.243-245.
Akinpelu, V, Amusa Y, Eziyi J, Haastrup AA, Ameye S.  2007.  Oesophageal denture impaction producing Horner's syndrome: A case report, 2007/10/01. 121:e17. Abstract

Dentures in the oesophagus have been associated with various complications; however, Horner's syndrome following denture impaction has not been reported in our locality.Horner's syndrome developed in a 26-year-old woman following accidental swallowing of an upper denture which then became impacted in the oesophagus. The denture was retrieved via cervical oesophagotomy. The syndrome abated completely by the seventh day post-surgery. The clinical features of Horner's syndrome are discussed.
Compression of the stellate ganglion, with resultant Horner's syndrome, can be associated with denture impaction in the cervical oesophagus.

2008
Kuliya-Gwarzo, A, Ibegbulam OG, Mamman A, Raji AA, Akingbola TS, Mabayoje VO, Ocheni S, Tanko Y, Amusu OA, Akinyanju OO, Ndakotsu MA, Kassim DO, Arewa OP, Bolarinwa RAA, Olaniyi JA, Okocha CE, Akinola NO, Bamgbade OO, Adediran IA, Salawu L, Faluyi JO, Oyekunle AA, Okanny CC, Akanmu S, Halim DNK, Bazuaye GN, Enosolease ME, Nwauche CA, Ogbe OP, Wakama TT, Durosinmi MA.  2008.  The use of Imatinib mesylate (Glivec) in Nigerian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.. Cellular Therapy and Transplantation. 1:10.3205/ctt-2008-en-000027.01., Number 2 Abstract

Objectives: To assess response and toxicity to Imatinib mesylate (Glivec) in Nigerian Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: From August 2003 to August 2007, 98 consecutive, consenting patients, 56 (57%) males and 42 (43%) females, median age 36 years (range, 11-65 years) diagnosed with CML, irrespective of disease phase received Imatinib at a dose of 300-600mg/day at the OAU Teaching Hospitals, Nigeria. Response to therapy was assessed by clinical, haematological and cytogenetic parameters. Blood counts were checked every two weeks in the first three months of therapy. Chromosome analysis was repeated sixth monthly. Overall survival (OS) and frequency of complete or major cytogenetic remission (CCR/MCR) were evaluated. Results: Complete haematologic remission was achieved in 64% and 83% of patients at one and three months, respectively. With a median follow-up of 25 months, the rates of CCR and MCR were 59% and 35% respectively. At 12 months of follow-up, OS and progression- free survival (PFS) were 96% and 91%, respectively. Achievement of CR at six months was associated with significantly better survival (p = 0.043).Conclusions: Compared to treatment outcome with conventional chemotherapy and alpha interferon, as previously used in Nigeria, the results obtained with this regimen has established Imatinib as the first-line treatment strategy in patients with CML, as it is in other populations, with minimal morbidity.

Perel, PA, Olldashi F, Muzha I, Filipi N, Lede R, Copertari P, Traverso C, Copertari A, Vergara EA, Montenegro C et al..  2008.  Predicting outcome after traumatic brain injury: Practical prognostic models based on large cohort of international patients, 2008. BMJ. 336(7641) Abstract

Objective: To develop and validate practical prognostic models for death at 14 days and for death or severe disability six months after traumatic brain injury. Design: Multivariable logistic regression to select variables that were independently associated with two patient outcomes. Two models designed: "basic" model (demographic and clinical variables only) and "CT" model (basic model plus results of computed tomography). The models were subsequently developed for high and low-middle income countries separately. Setting: Medical Research Council (MRC) CRASH Trial. Subjects: 10 008 patients with traumatic brain injury. Models externally validated in a cohort of 8509. Results: The basic model included four predictors: age, Glasgow coma scale, pupil reactivity, and the presence of major extracranial injury. The CT model also included the presence of petechial haemorrhages, obliteration of the third ventricle or basal cisterns, subarachnoid bleeding, midline shift, and non-evacuated haematoma. In the derivation sample the models showed excellent discrimination (C statistic above 0.80). The models showed good calibration graphically. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test also indicated good calibration, except for the CT model in low-middle income countries. External validation for unfavourable outcome at six months in high income countries showed that basic and CT models had good discrimination (C statistic 0.77 for both models) but poorer calibration. Conclusion: Simple prognostic models can be used to obtain valid predictions of relevant outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury.

De Vries(nci, J, Murtomaa H, Butler(com M, Cherrett(nci H, Ferrillo(nci P, Ferro M, Gadbury-Amyot C, Haden K, Manogue M, Mintz J, E. Mulvihill(nci J, Murray(nci B, Nattestad A, Nielsen(nci D, Ogunbodede E, Parkash H, Plasschaert(nci F, T. Reed(nci M, L. Rupp(com R, Shanley(nci D.  2008.  The Global Network on Dental Education: a new vision for IFDEA, 2008/02/15. European Journal of Dental Education. 12:167-175. Abstract

The advent of globalization has changed our perspectives radically. It presents increased understanding of world affairs, new challenges and exciting opportunities. The inequitable distribution and use of finite energy resources and global warming are just two examples of challenges that can only be addressed by concerted international collaboration. Globalization has become an increasingly important influence on dentistry and dental education. The International Federation for Dental Educators and Associations (IFDEA) welcomes the challenges it now faces as a player in a complex multifaceted global community. This report addresses the new circumstances in which IFDEA must operate, taking account of the recommendations made by other working groups. The report reviews the background and evolution of IFDEA and describes the extensive developments that have taken place in IFDEA over the past year with the introductions of a new Constitution and Bylaws overseen by a newly established Board of Directors. These were the consequence of a new mission, goals and objectives for IFDEA. An expanded organization is planned using http://www.IFDEA.org as the primary instrument to facilitate the exchange of knowledge, programmes and expertise between colleagues and federated associations throughout the world, thereby promoting higher standards in oral health through education in low-, middle- and high-income countries of the world. Such aspirations are modified by the reality and enormity of poverty-related global ill health.

2009
Aderemi, HO, Hassan OM, Siyanbola WO, Taiwo K.  2009.  Managing science and technology occupations of women in Nigeria. Journal of technology management & innovation. 4(3):34-45.: Universidad Alberto Hurtado. Facultad de Economía y Negocios Abstract
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Tiono, AB, Dicko A, Ndububa DA, Agbenyega T, Pitmang S, Awobusuyi J, Pamba A, Duparc S, Goh LE, Harrell E, Carter N, Ward SA, Greenwood B, Winstanley PA.  2009.  Chlorproguanil-Dapsone-Artesunate versus Chlorproguanil-Dapsone: A randomized, double-blind, phase III trial in African children, adolescents and adults with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. . American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. 81:969–978.
2010
Olukoga, A, Folayan M, Harris G, Ajayi O.  2010.  An analysis of listening skills of healthcare students in Nigeria . West Africa Journal of Medicine . 29(2):104-108.
xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/06/10. Abstract
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xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/10/20. Abstract

Research and development (R&D) is a significant component of quality higher education. This is quite understandable and appreciable because R&D, most especially in Science and Technology (S&T), has become the most enduring and effective means of improving sustainable economic growth, development and re-enforcing competitiveness in industries in a rapidly changing world. Universities are widely regarded not only as teaching establishments but also as organisations that create new knowledge and innovation through research. Many academics are of the opinion that doing research improves their teaching (Colbeck, 1998, 2002; Gamson, 1995; Stevans and Reingold, 2000; Robertson and Bond, 2001; Wenzel, 2001; Winkler, 1992a, b; Woolcock, 1997; Zamorski, 2002; in Begum, 2006). In recent times, universities often use evidence of research excellenceto employ or promote staff. The main claim of the teachers and administrators are that research activity can and does serve as an important mode of teaching and a valuable means of learning and thus research is a strong condition for teaching.R&D is one of the main thrusts of activities of western universities. The developed nations have clearly demonstrated that one of the most potent means of achieving developmental goals is effective building of capability in Research and Development. They have also demonstrated the relevance of effective collaboration to sustainable scientific and technological advancement (Boozeman and Lee, 2003). To corroborate this, Ehikhamenor (2003) opined that scientific productivity, in the form of intellectual contributions to the advancement of S&T, is a fundamental consideration in the scientific enterprise. A crucial requirement for
productivity and development in S&T is a system of communication among scientists and the dissemination of scientific information. Productive R&D is expected to lead to new product(s) development or improvement of existing product(s), new process development or improvement of existing process, patents, copyrights and publications. Scientific publication is a sign of good quality of invention and research outputs. Patents, copyrights, and funds from companies are signs that those inventions have market potentials (Carneiro, 2000; Werner and Souder, 1997; in Numprasertchai and Igel, 2005). Tangible R&D outcomes should promote the link between academia and the industry. However, many private and public organizations in Nigeria are skeptical about R&D outcomes from the universities and in many cases the needs of these organisations are not met. These invariably have further widened the gap between universities and industries (Oyebisi et al., 1996).
Many studies on research productivity and collaborations include an underlining assumption that collaborative activities increase research productivity (Duque et al., 2005). However, there is a dearth of information on the validity of this proposition in Nigeria. Are Nigerian researchers collaborating for R&D among themselves and with others outside their institutions? What factors inhibit collaboration activities of researchers? What influence do researchers’ collaborations have on their R&D productivity? These are some of the pertinent questions addressed in this study. For the survey, 457 copies of questionnaire were randomly distributed among lecturers. 274 of these were returned and found useful (60% response rate). The field respondents were from Faculties of Agriculture (30.8%), Science (38.8%) and Engineering/Technology (30.4%). In assessing R&D productivity of researchers we adopt the partial productivity approach. Researchers’ publications were used as output and the number of years spent to produce the publications as input (in this study 5 years, (2004 – 2008)). The normal count (of output), which is the most frequently used approach, is adopted. The outcome of the study indicated a positive relationship between R&D productivity and collaboration. This is in agreement with some previous studies on the subject of research productivity and collaboration (Lee and Bozeman, 2005; Landry et al., 1996; Harman, 1999; in Rijnsoever et al., 2008, Walsh and Maloney, 2003; in Duque et. al., (2005)

2011
Schnittger, S, Bacher U, Zander AR, Klyuchnikov E, Haferlach T, Kröger N, Oyekunle A.  2011.  Molecular Diagnostics, Targeted Therapy, and the Indication for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Advances in Hematology. 2011 AbstractWebsite
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