Publications

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Book
A, O, Folayan M, T O, Harris G, Ogunbodede E.  2011.  Health workers perception of hospital’s institutional structure, 2011/01/01. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 1:79-88. Abstract
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A, O, Folayan M, T O, Harris G, Ogunbodede E.  2011.  Health workers perception of hospital’s institutional structure, 2011/01/01. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 1:79-88. Abstract
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xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/10/20. Abstract

Research and development (R&D) is a significant component of quality higher education. This is quite understandable and appreciable because R&D, most especially in Science and Technology (S&T), has become the most enduring and effective means of improving sustainable economic growth, development and re-enforcing competitiveness in industries in a rapidly changing world. Universities are widely regarded not only as teaching establishments but also as organisations that create new knowledge and innovation through research. Many academics are of the opinion that doing research improves their teaching (Colbeck, 1998, 2002; Gamson, 1995; Stevans and Reingold, 2000; Robertson and Bond, 2001; Wenzel, 2001; Winkler, 1992a, b; Woolcock, 1997; Zamorski, 2002; in Begum, 2006). In recent times, universities often use evidence of research excellenceto employ or promote staff. The main claim of the teachers and administrators are that research activity can and does serve as an important mode of teaching and a valuable means of learning and thus research is a strong condition for teaching.R&D is one of the main thrusts of activities of western universities. The developed nations have clearly demonstrated that one of the most potent means of achieving developmental goals is effective building of capability in Research and Development. They have also demonstrated the relevance of effective collaboration to sustainable scientific and technological advancement (Boozeman and Lee, 2003). To corroborate this, Ehikhamenor (2003) opined that scientific productivity, in the form of intellectual contributions to the advancement of S&T, is a fundamental consideration in the scientific enterprise. A crucial requirement for
productivity and development in S&T is a system of communication among scientists and the dissemination of scientific information. Productive R&D is expected to lead to new product(s) development or improvement of existing product(s), new process development or improvement of existing process, patents, copyrights and publications. Scientific publication is a sign of good quality of invention and research outputs. Patents, copyrights, and funds from companies are signs that those inventions have market potentials (Carneiro, 2000; Werner and Souder, 1997; in Numprasertchai and Igel, 2005). Tangible R&D outcomes should promote the link between academia and the industry. However, many private and public organizations in Nigeria are skeptical about R&D outcomes from the universities and in many cases the needs of these organisations are not met. These invariably have further widened the gap between universities and industries (Oyebisi et al., 1996).
Many studies on research productivity and collaborations include an underlining assumption that collaborative activities increase research productivity (Duque et al., 2005). However, there is a dearth of information on the validity of this proposition in Nigeria. Are Nigerian researchers collaborating for R&D among themselves and with others outside their institutions? What factors inhibit collaboration activities of researchers? What influence do researchers’ collaborations have on their R&D productivity? These are some of the pertinent questions addressed in this study. For the survey, 457 copies of questionnaire were randomly distributed among lecturers. 274 of these were returned and found useful (60% response rate). The field respondents were from Faculties of Agriculture (30.8%), Science (38.8%) and Engineering/Technology (30.4%). In assessing R&D productivity of researchers we adopt the partial productivity approach. Researchers’ publications were used as output and the number of years spent to produce the publications as input (in this study 5 years, (2004 – 2008)). The normal count (of output), which is the most frequently used approach, is adopted. The outcome of the study indicated a positive relationship between R&D productivity and collaboration. This is in agreement with some previous studies on the subject of research productivity and collaboration (Lee and Bozeman, 2005; Landry et al., 1996; Harman, 1999; in Rijnsoever et al., 2008, Walsh and Maloney, 2003; in Duque et. al., (2005)

xiv Siyanbola, Isola O, Hassan O, Ogundari I, Awoleye M, Adesina F, Ilori M.  2010.  R&D productivity and collaborations in selected Nigerian universities., 2010/06/10. Abstract
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De Vries(nci, J, Murtomaa H, Butler(com M, Cherrett(nci H, Ferrillo(nci P, Ferro M, Gadbury-Amyot C, Haden K, Manogue M, Mintz J, E. Mulvihill(nci J, Murray(nci B, Nattestad A, Nielsen(nci D, Ogunbodede E, Parkash H, Plasschaert(nci F, T. Reed(nci M, L. Rupp(com R, Shanley(nci D.  2008.  The Global Network on Dental Education: a new vision for IFDEA, 2008/02/15. European Journal of Dental Education. 12:167-175. Abstract

The advent of globalization has changed our perspectives radically. It presents increased understanding of world affairs, new challenges and exciting opportunities. The inequitable distribution and use of finite energy resources and global warming are just two examples of challenges that can only be addressed by concerted international collaboration. Globalization has become an increasingly important influence on dentistry and dental education. The International Federation for Dental Educators and Associations (IFDEA) welcomes the challenges it now faces as a player in a complex multifaceted global community. This report addresses the new circumstances in which IFDEA must operate, taking account of the recommendations made by other working groups. The report reviews the background and evolution of IFDEA and describes the extensive developments that have taken place in IFDEA over the past year with the introductions of a new Constitution and Bylaws overseen by a newly established Board of Directors. These were the consequence of a new mission, goals and objectives for IFDEA. An expanded organization is planned using http://www.IFDEA.org as the primary instrument to facilitate the exchange of knowledge, programmes and expertise between colleagues and federated associations throughout the world, thereby promoting higher standards in oral health through education in low-, middle- and high-income countries of the world. Such aspirations are modified by the reality and enormity of poverty-related global ill health.

Osasona, CO, Hyland ADC.  2006.  Colonial Architecture in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. , Ibadan: Bookbuilders Editions Africa
Book Chapter
Folayan, M, Haire B, Peterson K, Yakubu A, Tegli J, Brown B.  2019.  Chapter 17: Criminalisation and "Reckless" Ebola Transmission: Theorizing Ethical Obligations to Seek Care, 2019/07/01. Abstract
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Nwhator, S, Heikkinen A, Tervahartiala T, Gieselmann D-R, Leppilahti J, Sorsa T.  2018.  Topic: aMMP-8 Oral Fluid PoC Test, 2018/06/19. :33-41. Abstract
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Sorsa, T, Heikkinen A, Leppilahti J, Tervahartiala T, Nwhator S, Rathnayake N, Mäntylä P, Gieselmann D-R, Netuschil L.  2018.  Active Matrix Metalloproteinase-8: Contributor to Periodontitis and a Missing Link Between Genetics, Dentistry, and Medicine, 2018/01/01. :51-57. Abstract
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Folayan, MO, Haire B.  2016.  History, culture and social norms: implications for ebola drug and vaccine clinical trials in affected region. Ebola’s Message: Public Health and Medicine in the 21st Century . , Rogers Street in Cambridge, MA 02142: MIT Press
Conference Paper
Siccardi, M, Olagunju A, Curley P, Hobson J, Khoo S, Back D, Owen A.  2013.  Prediction of Etravirine Pharmacogenetics Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Approach (Abstract #888), 3-6 March. 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI). , Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract

Background: Etravirine (ETV) is metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19. A known inhibitor of CYP2C19, omeprazole increases ETV exposure by 41%. Since CYP2C19*2 (rs4244285) can affect CYP2C19 expression there is the potential to alter ETV exposure. We previously showed utility of physiologically based PK (PBPK) models for predicting genetic associations and drug-drug interactions from in vitro data in the absence of clinical data. The aim of this study was to develop a PBPK model for ETV PK and predict effects of CYP2C19*2 in virtual human subjects.

Methods: A new open-source PBPK model was developed with algorithms describing covariance between demographics and organ size, hepatic metabolism, induction of metabolic enzymes, expression, and mechanisms regulating absorption and distribution. In vitro data describing chemical properties as well as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of ETV were used to simulate ETV PK at 200 mg twice daily in 200 virtual subjects. Simulated PK parameters, such as Ctrough, Cmax, and AUC were compared with observed values from the literature. The impact of CYP2C19*2 on ETV clearance was then determined by altering CYP2C19 expression in the model. All simulations were conducted using the differential equation solver Berkeley Madonna.

Results: Simulated PK variables at steady state (mean ± SD) were Ctrough (293 ± 185 ng/mL), Cmax (363 ± 207 ng/mL), and AUC (4005 ± 2364 ng/mL.h), in agreement with previous clinical PK data: Ctrough (297 ± 391 ng/mL) and AUC (4522 ± 4710 ng/mL.h). Simulated mean ETV clearance (CL/F), volume of distribution, and ka were 59 ± 31 (L/h), 14.9 ± 3.6 L/kg, and 0.17 ± 0.011 hr–1, respectively. ETV (CL/F) was predicted to be 62 ± 35, 53 ± 31, and 41 ± 28 L/h for CYP2C19 *1/*1, *1/*2 and *2/*2, respectively.

Conclusions: The IVIVE model predicted in vivo PK of ETV in individuals with different CYP2C19 genotypes. The frequency of CYP2C19*2 has a higher frequency in Asian populations which may underpin heterogeneity in ETV exposure. Mechanistic evaluation of disposition can inform PBPK models and prediction of pharmacogenetic associations. IVIVE may be particularly helpful for the rational design of novel regimens for use in stratified populations. This includes prediction of optimal dose and dosing regimen, selection of partner drugs and validation of the likely overall pharmacological effect of discrete molecular processes, all of which can and should be tested in clinical studies.

Database
Sartorius, B, VanderHeide J, Yang M, Goosmann E, Hon J, Haeuser E, Chowdhury MAK, Perkins S, Jahagirdar D, Schaeffer L, Serfes A, LeGrand K, Abbastabar H, Hailemariam Z, Eshete A, Abu-Gharbieh E, Accrombessi M, Adebayo O, Adegbosin A.  2021.  Subnational mapping of HIV incidence and mortality among individuals aged 15–49 years in sub-Saharan Africa, 2000–18: a modelling study, 2021/06/05. Abstract
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Journal Article
Amarquaye, G, Arrow P, Bansal K, Bedi R, Campus G, Chen KJ, Chibinski A, Chinzorig T, Crystal Y, Duangthip D, Ferri M, Folayan M, Garidkhuu A, Hamama H, Jirarattanasopa V, Kemoli A, Leal S, Leelataweewud P, Chu C-H.  2021.  Global Oral Health Policies and Guidelines: Using Silver Diamine Fluoride for Caries Control, 2021/07/01. 2:685557. Abstract
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Chen, KJ, Duangthip D, Gao S, Huang F, Anthonappa R, Oliveira B, Turton B, Durward C, El Tantawi M, Attia D, Heima M, Muthu S, Maharani D, Folayan M, Phantumvanit P, Sitthisettapong T, Innes N, Crystal Y, Ramos-Gomez F, Chu C-H.  2021.  Oral Health Policies to Tackle the Burden of Early Childhood Caries: A Review of 14 Countries/Regions, 2021/06/01. 2:670154. Abstract
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Sartorius, B, VanderHeide J, Yang M, Goosmann E, Hon J, Haeuser E, Chowdhury MAK, Perkins S, Jahagirdar D, Schaeffer L, Serfes A, LeGrand K, Abbastabar H, Hailemariam Z, Eshete A, Abu-Gharbieh E, Accrombessi M, Adebayo O, Adegbosin A.  2021.  Subnational mapping of HIV incidence and mortality among individuals aged 15–49 years in sub-Saharan Africa, 2000–18: a modelling study, 2021/06/01. 8:e363-e375. Abstract
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Folayan, M, Brown B, Haire B, Ndembi N, Babalola C.  2021.  Considerations for stakeholder engagement and COVID-19- pandemic group journal - aug 2020, 2021/05/30. Abstract
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Jiang, CM, Duangthip D, Auychai P, Chiba M, Folayan M, Hamama H, Kamnoedboon P, Lyons K, Matangkasombut O, Mathu-Muju K, Mathur V, Mei ML, Morgan M, Poolthong S, Morankar R, Srinivasan M, Takahashi T, Yaklai S, Zhang S, Lo E.  2021.  Changes in Oral Health Policies and Guidelines During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Frontiers in Oral Health, 2021/05/21. 2 Abstract
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Ammar, N, M. Aly N, Folayan M, Khader Y, Mohebbi S, Attia S, Howaldt H-P, Böttger S, Virtanen J, Madi M, Maharani D, Rahardjo A, Khan I, Al-Batayneh O, Rashwan M, Pavlić V, Cicmil S, Noritake K, Galluccio G, El Tantawi M.  2021.  Perceived Preparedness of Dental Academic Institutions to Cope with the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Multi-Country Survey, 2021/02/04. 18:1445. Abstract
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Ajama, OD, Awoyemi MO, Arogundade AB, Dasho OA, Falade SC, Hammed OS, Shode OH.  2021.  Deep Crustal Network of the Equatorial Atlantic Fracture Zones in Southern Nigeria, 2021. :100027.: Elsevier Abstract
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Akpa, OM, Okekunle AP, Ovbiagele B, Sarfo FS, Akinyemi RO, Akpalu A, Wahab KW, Komolafe M, Obiako R, Owolabi LF, Ogbole G, Fawale B, Fakunle A, Asaleye CM, Akisanya CO, Hamisu DA, Ogunjimi L, Adeoye A, Ogah O, Lackland D, Uvere EO, Faniyan MM, Asowata OJ, Adeleye O, Aridegbe M, Olunuga T, Yahaya IS, Olaleye A, Calys-Tagoe B, Owolabi MO.  2021.  Factors associated with hypertension among stroke-free indigenous Africans: Findings from the SIREN study, 2021. Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 23(4) Abstract

Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for stroke and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) globally. Understanding risk factors for hypertension among individuals with matching characteristics with stroke patients may inform primordial/primary prevention of hypertension and stroke among them. This study identified the risk factors for hypertension among community-dwelling stroke-free population in Ghana and Nigeria. Data for 4267 community-dwelling stroke-free controls subjects in the Stroke Investigative Research and Education Network (SIREN) study in Nigeria and Ghana were used. Participants were comprehensively assessed for sociodemographic, lifestyle and metabolic factors using standard methods. Hypertension was defined as a previous diagnosis by a health professional or use of an anti-hypertensive drug or mean systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) of hypertension and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) at p <.05. Overall, 56.7% of the participants were hypertensive with a higher proportion among respondents aged ≥60 years (53.0%). Factors including physical inactivity (aOR: 9.09; 95% CI: 4.03 to 20.53, p <.0001), diabetes (aOR: 2.70; CI: 1.91 to 3.82, p <.0001), being ≥60 years (aOR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.77, p <.0001), and family history of CVD (aOR 2.02; CI: 1.59 to 2.56, p <.0001) were associated with increased aOR of hypertension. Lifestyle factors were associated with hypertension in the current population of community-dwelling stroke-free controls in west Africa. Community-oriented interventions to address sedentary lifestyles may benefit this population and reduce/prevent hypertension and stroke among them.

Olagunju, A, Adeola F, Olagunoye A, Ojo T, Adefuye B, Fagbamigbe A, Adebiyi A, Olagunju O, Ladipo O, Akinloye A, Adeagbo B, Onayade A, Bolaji O, Happi C, Rannard S, Owen A.  2021.  Efficacy and safety of nitazoxanide plus atazanavir/ritonavir for the treatment of moderate to severe COVID-19 (NACOVID): A structured summary of a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, 12. Trials. 22 Abstract
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Lyra Jr, H, Collaborative G, Nepogodiev D, Simoes J, Li E, Picciochi M, Glasbey J, Baiocchi G, Blanco-Colino R, Chaudhry D, Alameer E, Elsanhoury K, Funmi W, Ghosh D, Gujjuri R, Harrison E, Lule H, Kaafarani H, Nabian MH, Egbuchulem I.  2021.  Effects of pre-operative isolation on postoperative pulmonary complications after elective surgery: an international prospective cohort study, 08. Anaesthesia. Abstract
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Nepogodiev, D, Baiocchi G, Blanco-Colino R, Wuraola F, Ghosh D, Gujjuri R, Harrison E, Lule H, Kaafarani H, Leventoğlu S, McLean K, Mengesha MG, Faustin N, Outani O, Ots R, Pockney P, Qureshi A, Roslani A, Satoi S, Garcia-moreno F.  2021.  Timing of surgery following SARS-CoV-2 infection: an international prospective cohort study, 06. Anaesthesia. 76:748-758. Abstract
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Akpa, O, Okekunle A, Ovbiagele B, Sarfo F, Akinyemi R, Akpalu A, Wahab K, Komolafe M, Obiako R, Owolabi L, Ogbole G, Fawale M, Fakunle A, Asaleye M, Akisanya C, Hamisu D, Ogunjimi L, Adeoye A, Ogah O, the Consortium.  2021.  Factors associated with hypertension among stroke‐free indigenous Africans: Findings from the SIREN study, 01. The Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 23 Abstract
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