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Owolabi, M, Sarfo F, Howard VJ, Irvin MR, Gebregziabher M, Akinyemi R, Bennett A, Armstrong K, Tiwari HK, Akpalu A, Wahab KW, Owolabi L, Fawale B, Komolafe M, Obiako R, Adebayo P, Manly JM, Ogbole G, Melikam E, Laryea R, Saulson R, Jenkins C, Arnett DK, Lackland DT, Ovbiagele B, Howard G.  2017.  Stroke in Indigenous Africans, African Americans, and European Americans: Interplay of Racial and Geographic Factors, 2017. Stroke. 48(5) Abstract

Background and Purpose - The relative contributions of racial and geographic factors to higher risk of stroke in people of African ancestry have not been unraveled. We compared stroke type and contributions of vascular risk factors among indigenous Africans (IA), African Americans (AA), and European Americans (EA). Methods - SIREN (Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network) is a large multinational case-control study in West Africa - the ancestral home of 71% AA - whereas REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) is a cohort study including AA and EA in the United States. Using harmonized assessments and standard definitions, we compared data on stroke type and established risk factors for stroke in acute stroke cases aged ≥55 years in both studies. Results - There were 811 IA, 452 AA, and 665 EA stroke subjects, with mean age of 68.0±9.3, 73.0±8.3, and 76.0±8.3 years, respectively (P<0.0001). Hemorrhagic stroke was more frequent among IA (27%) compared with AA (8%) and EA (5.4%; P<0.001). Lacunar strokes were more prevalent in IA (47.1%), followed by AA (35.1%) and then EA (21.0%; P<0.0001). The frequency of hypertension in decreasing order was IA (92.8%), followed by AA (82.5%) and then EA (64.2%; P<0.0001) and similarly for diabetes mellitus IA (38.3%), AA (36.8%), and EA (21.0%; P<0.0001). Premorbid sedentary lifestyle was similar in AA (37.7%) and EA (34.0%) but lower frequency in IA (8.0%). Conclusions - Environmental risk factors such as sedentary lifestyle may contribute to the higher proportion of ischemic stroke in AA compared with IA, whereas racial factors may contribute to the higher proportion of hypertension and diabetes mellitus among stroke subjects of African ancestry.

Arogundade, AB, Awoyemi MO, Hammed OS, Falade SC, Ajama OD.  2020.  Structural Investigation of Zungeru-Kalangai Fault Zone, Nigeria using Aeromagnetic and Remote Sensing Data, 2020. Abstract
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Arogundade, AB, Awoyemi MO, Hammed OS, Falade SC, Ajama OD.  2020.  Structural Investigation of Zungeru-Kalangai Fault Zone, Nigeria using Aeromagnetic and Remote Sensing Data, 2020. Abstract
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Sartorius, B, VanderHeide J, Yang M, Goosmann E, Hon J, Haeuser E, Chowdhury MAK, Perkins S, Jahagirdar D, Schaeffer L, Serfes A, LeGrand K, Abbastabar H, Hailemariam Z, Eshete A, Abu-Gharbieh E, Accrombessi M, Adebayo O, Adegbosin A.  2021.  Subnational mapping of HIV incidence and mortality among individuals aged 15–49 years in sub-Saharan Africa, 2000–18: a modelling study, 2021/06/05. Abstract
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Sartorius, B, VanderHeide J, Yang M, Goosmann E, Hon J, Haeuser E, Chowdhury MAK, Perkins S, Jahagirdar D, Schaeffer L, Serfes A, LeGrand K, Abbastabar H, Hailemariam Z, Eshete A, Abu-Gharbieh E, Accrombessi M, Adebayo O, Adegbosin A.  2021.  Subnational mapping of HIV incidence and mortality among individuals aged 15–49 years in sub-Saharan Africa, 2000–18: a modelling study, 2021/06/01. 8:e363-e375. Abstract
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Folayan, MO, Odetoyingbo M, Brown B, Harrison A.  2014.  Tackling the sexual and reproductive health and rights of adolescents living with HIV/AIDS: a priority need in Nigeria . African Journal of Reproductive Health . 18(3):102-108.
Oluwole, OG, Kuivaniemi H, Abrahams S, Haylett WL, Vorster AA, Van Heerden CJ, Kenyon CP, Tabb DL, Fawale MB, Sunmonu TA, Ajose A, Olaogun MO, Rossouw AC, Van Hillegondsberg LS, Carr J, Ross OA, Komolafe MA, Tromp G, Bardien S.  2020.  Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies novel variants in candidate genes for Parkinson's disease in Black South African and Nigerian patients, 2020. BMC Medical Genetics. 21(1) Abstract

Background: The prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known about the genetics of PD in these populations. Due to their unique ancestry and diversity, sub-Saharan African populations have the potential to reveal novel insights into the pathobiology of PD. In this study, we aimed to characterise the genetic variation in known and novel PD genes in a group of Black South African and Nigerian patients. Methods: We recruited 33 Black South African and 14 Nigerian PD patients, and screened them for sequence variants in 751 genes using an Ion AmpliSeq™ Neurological Research panel. We used bcftools to filter variants and annovar software for the annotation. Rare variants were prioritised using MetaLR and MetaSVM prediction scores. The effect of a variant on ATP13A2's protein structure was investigated by molecular modelling. Results: We identified 14,655 rare variants with a minor allele frequency ≤ 0.01, which included 2448 missense variants. Notably, no common pathogenic mutations were identified in these patients. Also, none of the known PD-associated mutations were found highlighting the need for more studies in African populations. Altogether, 54 rare variants in 42 genes were considered deleterious and were prioritized, based on MetaLR and MetaSVM scores, for follow-up studies. Protein modelling showed that the S1004R variant in ATP13A2 possibly alters the conformation of the protein. Conclusions: We identified several rare variants predicted to be deleterious in sub-Saharan Africa PD patients; however, further studies are required to determine the biological effects of these variants and their possible role in PD. Studies such as these are important to elucidate the genetic aetiology of this disorder in patients of African ancestry.

Hammed, OS, Awoyemi MO, Igboama WN, Ebun DO, Fatoba JO, Olurin OT, Aroyehun M, Badmus GO, Arogundade AB, Falade SC.  2017.  THREE DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC, WELL LOG AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF" IGBOBI" FIELD, OFFSHORE NIGER DELTA., 2017. 59(5) Abstract
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Hammed, OS, Awoyemi MO, Igboama WN, Ebun DO, Fatoba JO, Olurin OT, Aroyehun M, Badmus GO, Arogundade AB, Falade SC.  2017.  THREE DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC, WELL LOG AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF" IGBOBI" FIELD, OFFSHORE NIGER DELTA., 2017. 59(5) Abstract
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Nepogodiev, D, Baiocchi G, Blanco-Colino R, Wuraola F, Ghosh D, Gujjuri R, Harrison E, Lule H, Kaafarani H, Leventoğlu S, McLean K, Mengesha MG, Faustin N, Outani O, Ots R, Pockney P, Qureshi A, Roslani A, Satoi S, Garcia-moreno F.  2021.  Timing of surgery following SARS-CoV-2 infection: an international prospective cohort study, 06. Anaesthesia. 76:748-758. Abstract
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Nwhator, S, Heikkinen A, Tervahartiala T, Gieselmann D-R, Leppilahti J, Sorsa T.  2018.  Topic: aMMP-8 Oral Fluid PoC Test, 2018/06/19. :33-41. Abstract
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Folayan, MO, Odetoyinbo M, Brown B, Harrison A.  2014.  The underserved sexual and reproductive health needs of adolescents living with HIV in Nigeria . Nigerian Journal of Health Sciences . 14:61-64.
Haire, BG, Folayan MO.  2017.  Undue inducement, or unfair exclusion: considering a case study of pregnancy in an HIV prevention trial. Journal of Medical Ethics . pii: medethics-2017-104370:doi:10.1136/medethics-2017-104370..
Bokemeyer, C, Haferlach T, Kröger N, Zander AR, Dierlamm J, Ocheni S, Schafhausen P, Oyekunle A, Bacher U.  2011.  Unusual Course of Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Presumed Familial Origin. Acta Haematologica. 126:234-237., Number 4 AbstractWebsite

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Kuliya-Gwarzo, A, Ibegbulam OG, Mamman A, Raji AA, Akingbola TS, Mabayoje VO, Ocheni S, Tanko Y, Amusu OA, Akinyanju OO, Ndakotsu MA, Kassim DO, Arewa OP, Bolarinwa RAA, Olaniyi JA, Okocha CE, Akinola NO, Bamgbade OO, Adediran IA, Salawu L, Faluyi JO, Oyekunle AA, Okanny CC, Akanmu S, Halim DNK, Bazuaye GN, Enosolease ME, Nwauche CA, Ogbe OP, Wakama TT, Durosinmi MA.  2008.  The use of Imatinib mesylate (Glivec) in Nigerian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.. Cellular Therapy and Transplantation. 1:10.3205/ctt-2008-en-000027.01., Number 2 Abstract

Objectives: To assess response and toxicity to Imatinib mesylate (Glivec) in Nigerian Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: From August 2003 to August 2007, 98 consecutive, consenting patients, 56 (57%) males and 42 (43%) females, median age 36 years (range, 11-65 years) diagnosed with CML, irrespective of disease phase received Imatinib at a dose of 300-600mg/day at the OAU Teaching Hospitals, Nigeria. Response to therapy was assessed by clinical, haematological and cytogenetic parameters. Blood counts were checked every two weeks in the first three months of therapy. Chromosome analysis was repeated sixth monthly. Overall survival (OS) and frequency of complete or major cytogenetic remission (CCR/MCR) were evaluated. Results: Complete haematologic remission was achieved in 64% and 83% of patients at one and three months, respectively. With a median follow-up of 25 months, the rates of CCR and MCR were 59% and 35% respectively. At 12 months of follow-up, OS and progression- free survival (PFS) were 96% and 91%, respectively. Achievement of CR at six months was associated with significantly better survival (p = 0.043).Conclusions: Compared to treatment outcome with conventional chemotherapy and alpha interferon, as previously used in Nigeria, the results obtained with this regimen has established Imatinib as the first-line treatment strategy in patients with CML, as it is in other populations, with minimal morbidity.

Heidari, O, Ghuman P, Soohoo M, Davtyan M, Folayan MO, Brown B.  2014.  Using financial incentives for HIV prevention studies in diverse global contexts: a review of the literature. Nigerian Journal of Health Sciences . 14:43-55.
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Aluko, OO, Oloruntoba EO, Ana GREE, Hammed TB, Afolabi OT.  2020.  {Characteristics of co-composts produced from raw faecal sludge and organic market waste in Osun State, Southwest Nigeria}, aug. International journal of recycling organic waste in agriculture. 9:333–347., Number 4: Islamic Azad University-Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch- Iran AbstractWebsite

Purpose Faecal sludge (FS) and organic market waste (MW) have resources that could be recovered by co-composting though not fully explored under changing climatic conditions in Nigeria. This study explored the characteristics and nutrient quality of co-composts produced from pre-treated FS and MW feedstocks in Nigeria. Methods The study was exploratory and analytical in design and co-composting was purposively selected for resource-recovery. The raw faecal sludge (FS) was harvested from septic tanks of households (50%) and institutions (50%) through mechanical evacuation service trucks and dewatered using 0.1% gradient sand filter. The biodegradable MW was sorted and used for further studies. The dewatered FS (DFS) and MW were mixed in ratios 1:3, 1:5 and 1:7, respectively with DFS and MW as controls. Each of the mixes was made into 1m3 heap and co-composted using the windrow method. The experiments were monitored for 88 days with fortnight composite sampling from each mix (13-weeks). The samples were analyzed for temperature, pH, moisture-contents, micronutrients, macronutrients and pollutants using Standard Methods. Results At maturity, N:P:K (%) indicate good composts at 9: 5: 4, 18: 7: 19 and 3: 3: 1 in the 1: 3, 1: 5 and 1: 7 mixes, respectively, while those of controls were: 19:12:12 (DFS) and 17:14:11(MW) with no significant differences between experimental and control mixes. Also, four factors extracted (pollutants, agronomic, macronutrients and micronutrients), explained 78.2% variability. Conclusion The matured co-compost satisfied nutrients and pollutants quality for agricultural use, recovered organic fertiliser from raw domestic and institutional faecal sludge and market waste.

Aluko, OO, Oloruntoba EO, Chukwunenye UA, Henry EU, Ojogun E.  2018.  {The dynamics and determinants of household shared sanitation cleanliness in a heterogeneous urban settlement in Southwest Nigeria}, dec. Public Health. 165:125–135.: Elsevier AbstractWebsite

Objectives: The study assessed the behavioural contexts of household shared sanitation (SS), the factors that could enhance its cleanliness and sustainable maintenance in the study area. Study design: The study design was cross-sectional in nature. Methods: A pretested, interviewer-administered questionnaire with 113 questions provided information on knowledge, attitude and SS maintenance practices from 312 respondents selected through a four-stage sampling technique. Data were analysed by descriptive, chi-square and logistic regression statistics with attitude and toilet cleanliness as the dependent variables, while the sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge and practice, including the toilet cleanliness index, were the explanatory variables at P < 0.05. Results: The mean age of respondents was 46.1 ± 16.4 years. The majority were women (62.7%), tenants (64.7%) and had a secondary education (61.3%). In addition, 27.9% and 2.7% of respondents had shops and gender-segregated SS, respectively. Their knowledge and attitudes were good (66.3%) and positive (72.1%), while the majority (60.3%) of the SS was dirty. Almost two-thirds (62.8%) and 37.2% of respondents, respectively, had one and two or more compartments of unimproved pit toilets (31.6%) and water closets (28.6%), while 1.4% practiced open defaecation, despite having SS. More than two-fifths of SS were cleaned daily (45.4%) by women (52%), using water and soap (33.4%). Most households (93.4%) complied with the SS cleaning routines, with non-compliance attributed to lack of interest (29.5%), apathy when others defaulted (27.9%), lack of time (26.2%) and inadequate water (14.8%). There was a significant association between attitudes and education (P = 0.025), wealth (P = 0.011) and toilet-cleaning frequency (P = 0.015). The positive behaviour determinants of SS are factual knowledge (P = 0.039), efforts required to clean (P = 0.019), the ability to remember (P = 0.011) and cleaning commitment (P = 0.040), while freedom of expression among households using SS was a positive predictor of avoiding conflict, among the social dilemma factors. Conclusions: Good knowledge and positive attitudes were reported among users of SS, although with mixed practice and behaviour patterns. Factual knowledge, cleaning commitments and freedom of expressions predict SS cleanliness, which should be reinforced using periodic messages and structured health promotion strategies.

Udoh, Awoyemi, Olaniran O, Adefusi, Hassan-Olajokun, Odetoyin B, Idowu OJ.  2011.  The {{Prevalence}} and Susceptibility Patterns of {{Beta}}-Lactamase Producing {{Staphylococcus}} Aureus at {{OAUTHC Ile}}-{{Ife}}, {{Osun}} State, jan. International journal of biological sciences. 3:98–103. Abstract
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