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Bamise, CT, Bada TA, Bamise F, Ogunbodede E.  2008.  Dental Care Utilization and Satisfaction of Residential University Students, 2008/09/01. The Libyan journal of medicine. 3:140-3. Abstract

The objective of this study was to provide information on the level of utilization and satisfaction of residential university students with the dental services provided by the dental clinic of a teaching hospital. VOLUNTEERS AND MATERIAL: A stratified sampling technique was used to recruit volunteers from the outpatient clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Information was collected by a self-administered questionnaire composed of questions that measure the level of utilization and satisfaction with the dental services provided. Questionnaires were provided to 650 randomly chosen students residing in the University hostels. There were 39 refusals, and 6 incomplete questionnaires were discarded. This left a sample size of 605 volunteers.Forty seven students (7.8%) indicated that they visited the dental hospital within the last 12 months. Males and females utilized the dental services equally, and utilization increased with age and the number of years spent on campus. Anticipation of painful dental treatment, high dental charges, long waiting times and being too busy for a dental visit were cited as the most important impediments to seeking dental treatment. Females expressed greater satisfaction with the services.
Dental service utilization among the students was found to be low. Oral health awareness campaigns, improving the quality of the services, and shortening the waiting time are expected to increase service utilization and satisfaction.

Bamise, CT, Bada TA, Bamise F, Ogunbodede E.  2008.  Dental Care Utilization and Satisfaction of Residential University Students, 2008/09/01. The Libyan journal of medicine. 3:140-3. Abstract

The objective of this study was to provide information on the level of utilization and satisfaction of residential university students with the dental services provided by the dental clinic of a teaching hospital. VOLUNTEERS AND MATERIAL: A stratified sampling technique was used to recruit volunteers from the outpatient clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Information was collected by a self-administered questionnaire composed of questions that measure the level of utilization and satisfaction with the dental services provided. Questionnaires were provided to 650 randomly chosen students residing in the University hostels. There were 39 refusals, and 6 incomplete questionnaires were discarded. This left a sample size of 605 volunteers.Forty seven students (7.8%) indicated that they visited the dental hospital within the last 12 months. Males and females utilized the dental services equally, and utilization increased with age and the number of years spent on campus. Anticipation of painful dental treatment, high dental charges, long waiting times and being too busy for a dental visit were cited as the most important impediments to seeking dental treatment. Females expressed greater satisfaction with the services.
Dental service utilization among the students was found to be low. Oral health awareness campaigns, improving the quality of the services, and shortening the waiting time are expected to increase service utilization and satisfaction.

Bamise, CT, Ogunbodede E, Olusile A, Esan T.  2007.  Erosive Potential of Soft Drinks in Nigeria, 2007/01/01. World J Med Sci. 2 Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the erosive potential of some soft drinks commonly consumed in Nigeria. A range of popular carbonated drinks (cola and non-cola) and fruit juices were selected. On two occasions, the followings were determined; (1) the pH, measured by a digital pH meter on opening of th e packaging can or bottle. (2) The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to raise the pH of 50 ml of the drinks to pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. The pH before titration ranges from 2.70 to 4.48 for the carbonated drinks and 3.54-3.91 for the fruit juices. The soft drinks and the fruit juices investigated had pH before titration lower than the critical pH 5.5 for enamel dissolution. The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to bring the drinks to pH 5.5 ranged from 0.5 to 6.1mls and 1.8 to 8.2 mls of the base needed to neutralize the drinks to pH 7.0. The fruit juices needed the most base to neutralize its acidity. Despite having a lower pH than the fruit drinks, the carbonated drinks required a relatively lower base to neutralize. This study concludes that all the popular soft drinks in Nigeria selected for this study had significant erosive potential. They had pH below the critical pH of enamel dissolution. The erosive potential of the fruit juices was more than the carbonated cola and non-cola drinks. This information will be of use to clinicians when counseling patients with tooth surface loss.

Bamise, CT, Ogunbodede E, Olusile A, Esan T.  2007.  Erosive Potential of Soft Drinks in Nigeria, 2007/01/01. World J Med Sci. 2 Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the erosive potential of some soft drinks commonly consumed in Nigeria. A range of popular carbonated drinks (cola and non-cola) and fruit juices were selected. On two occasions, the followings were determined; (1) the pH, measured by a digital pH meter on opening of th e packaging can or bottle. (2) The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to raise the pH of 50 ml of the drinks to pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. The pH before titration ranges from 2.70 to 4.48 for the carbonated drinks and 3.54-3.91 for the fruit juices. The soft drinks and the fruit juices investigated had pH before titration lower than the critical pH 5.5 for enamel dissolution. The volume of 1.0M sodium hydroxide required to bring the drinks to pH 5.5 ranged from 0.5 to 6.1mls and 1.8 to 8.2 mls of the base needed to neutralize the drinks to pH 7.0. The fruit juices needed the most base to neutralize its acidity. Despite having a lower pH than the fruit drinks, the carbonated drinks required a relatively lower base to neutralize. This study concludes that all the popular soft drinks in Nigeria selected for this study had significant erosive potential. They had pH below the critical pH of enamel dissolution. The erosive potential of the fruit juices was more than the carbonated cola and non-cola drinks. This information will be of use to clinicians when counseling patients with tooth surface loss.

Bamitale, KDS, Akanmu MA, Ukponmwan OE.  2011.  Neuropharmacological Profile of Aqueous extract of Anaphe venata Larva (Notondotidae) in rats . African Journal Traditional . Vol. 8(3):260-266.
Bamitale, KDS, Akanmu MA, Okonji RE, Obuotor EM, Ukponmwan OE.  2011.  Involvement of Cholinergic-muscarinic receptor in Anaphe venata-inducted stretching-ataxia behavioural effects in rats. International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences. Vol. 5(3):851-860.
Bamiwuye, S, and Ogunbameru OA.  2004.  Attitudes Toward Retirement and Pre-retirement Education Among Nigerian Bank Workers. Educational Greontology. Vol. 30:No.5.
Banjo, OO, Akinyemi JO.  2017.  Spousal and Household Characteristics Associated with Women’s Fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa. Journal of Population and Social Studies. 26(1):13-31.spousal__household.pdf
Banjoko, S, Oseni F, Togun R, Onayemi O, Emma-Okon B, Fakunle J.  2012.  Iron status in HIV-1 infection: Implications in disease pathology, 12. BMC clinical pathology. 12:26. Abstract
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Bankole, Samson, Schrank, Eckart, Adeonipekun P.  2016.  PALEOECOLOGY OF THE NEOGENE AGBADA FORMATION, NIGER DELTA, NIGERIA. Ife Journal of Science. 18(4):845-859.bankoletal2.pdf
Bayowa, OG, Falebita DE, Olorunfemi MO, Adepelumi AA.  2012.  Groundwater Contamination Prediction Using Finite Element Derived Geoelectric Parameters Constrained by Chemical Analysis around a Sewage Site, Southwestern Nigeria. International Journal of Geosciences. 3((2) DOI:10.4236/IJG.2012.32045):404–409.
Bayowa, OG, Falebita DE, Adegboyega OR.  2015.  Surface DC Resistivity Survey of Contamination beneath Ido-Osun Dumpsite, Southwestern Nigeria. Geofisica Internationacional. 54(4):343-352.
Bebe, T, Odetoyin B, Bolarinwa R.  2020.  Occurrence of Multidrug-resistant uropathogens implicated in asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults with Sickle Cell Disease in Ile-Ife, Southwest Nigeria. Oman medical journal. 35:e109., Number 2: Oman Medical Specialty Board Abstract
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Bebe, T, Odetoyin B, Bolarinwa R.  2020.  Occurrence of {{Multidrug}}-Resistant {{Uropathogens Implicated}} in {{Asymptomatic Bacteriuria}} in {{Adults}} with {{Sickle Cell Disease}} in {{Ile}}-{{Ife}}, {{Southwest Nigeria}}. Oman medical journal. 35:e109., Number 2: {Oman Medical Specialty Board} Abstract

Objectives We sought to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the susceptibility profile of its agents and their extended-spectrum {$\beta$}-lactamase (ESBL) production. Methods Fifty-nine patients with SCD and 116 healthy controls were investigated. Urine samples were collected and cultured by standard techniques. We used the disc diffusion technique to determine antibiotic susceptibility. ESBL was detected by the combination disc method and detection of blaSHV, blaTEM, and blaCTX-M genes by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction. Results The prevalence of ASB was higher among patients with SCD (8.6%) than controls (0.9%) (p = 0.016), predominantly among females. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 2; 33.3%) predominated among the isolates. Other uropathogens included Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterobacter cloacae. All isolates were sensitive to meropenem but were resistant to ceftazidime, ampicillin, and tetracycline. blaSHV, blaTEM, and blaCTX-M-15 were detected in Enterobacter cloacae. Conclusions The prevalence of ASB is high in patients with SCD predominantly among females. Rare multidrug-resistant uropathogens were implicated. We posit a need for resistance surveillance programs and antibiotic stewardship to prevent treatment failure and reduce drug resistance.

Beckman, BJÖRN, Adeoti G.  2006.  Predicament and response: an introduction. Intellectual and African Development: Pretension and Resistance in African Politics. :5–8.: CODESRIA Dakar Abstract
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Bello, SA, Famurewa B, Omoregie OF.  2020.  Parotid gland neoplasms presenting as discrete infra-auricular swellings, 2020/01/01. 23:67. Abstract

Background: Parotid gland neoplasms usually present as pre-auricular swellings. Sometimes, they present as solitary infra-auricular swellings which make their localization difficult as they may be confused with submandibular gland or other lateral upper neck masses. Clinicopathological reports of discrete infra-auricular parotid lesions and their surgical managements are few. Objectives: To describe the clinical features and management of discrete infra-auricular parotid masses in a series of Nigerian patients seen during a surgical outreach mission. Methodology: This is a retrospective study of all infra-auricular swellings managed by a Nigerian surgical mission over 6 years. Patients' demographics, duration of swelling, symptoms, treatment, histopathological diagnosis, postoperative complications were retrieved from patients' records. Results: A total of 124 facial tumors were seen, of which 15 (12.1%) were parotid tumors. Eight cases (53.3%) of parotid tumors presented as discrete infra-auricular masses. Age range was 13–57 years (mean = 40.9 ± 15.4 years) with male predilection. Duration of swelling was between 1 and 15 years. All lesions were treated with extracapsular dissection. One patient had postoperative facial nerve paresis, but no facial palsy and sialocele. The histopathological results were 5 (62.5%) pleomorphic adenomas, 1 (12.5%) Warthin's tumor, and 2 (25%) low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Conclusion: Discrete infra-auricular swellings may present as benign and malignant parotid gland neoplasms.

Bello, SA, Abiona OO, Oluwatope AO, Sanmi ML, Onime CE, Eludiora SI, Aderounmu GA, Adagunodo ER, Kehinde LO.  2013.  An e-Business Grid Model Architecture for Small and Medium Scale Enterprises. an e-business grid model architecture.
Bello, VA, Ajayi CA.  2010.  ‘Occupants’ Satisfaction and Rent Paid for Residential Properties Close to Waste Dump Sites in Nigeria’. Journal of Sustainable Development, (Canada)). 3(1):98-103.
Bello, SA, Abiona OO, Oluwatope AO, Sanni ML, Onime CE, Eludiora SI, Aderounmu GA, Adagunodo ER, Kehinde LO.  2009.  An e-Business Grid Model Architecture for Small and Medium Scale Enterprises.
Bernard, OT.  2015.  Beyond Spoken Words: The Yoruba Indigenous Communication Practices. Ife: Journal of the Institute of Cultural Studies. 11:39-53.
Bernard, OT.  2018.  The Use of Incantations and Medicine in the Works of D. O. Fagunwa. IHAFA: A Journal of African Studies. 9(1):251-263.
Bernard, OT.  2018.  The Construction of Poverty in Selected Yoruba Written Poetry. Poverty and the Humanities. , Ile-Ife: The Faculty of Arts, Obafemi Awolowo University
Bienczak, A, Cook A, Wiensner L, Olagunju A, Mulenga V, Kityo C, Kekitiinwa A, Owen A, Walker S, Gibb D, McIlleron H, Burger D, Denti P.  2016.  The impact of genetic polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in African children. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. doi: 10.1111/bcp.12934(Epub ahead of print) Abstract

AIM: To characterise the efavirenz steady-state pharmacokinetics in African children using model-based approach, quantifying demographic and genotypic effects on the drug's disposition, and conduct simulations allowing prediction of optimised doses of efavirenz in this population.

METHODS: We modelled the steady-state population pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in Ugandan and Zambian children using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Individual mid-dose efavirenz concentrations were derived and simulations explored genotype-based dose optimisation strategies.

RESULTS: A 2-compartment model with absorption through transit compartments well described 2086 concentration-time points in 169 children. The combined effect of SNPs 516GT and 983TC explained 44.5% and 14.7% of the variability in efavirenz clearance and bioavailability, respectively. The detected frequencies of composite CYP2B6 genotype were 0.33 for 516GG|983TT, 0.35 for 516GT|983TT, 0.06 for 516GG|983TC, 0.18 for 516TT|983TT, 0.07 516GT|983TC and 0.01 for 516GG|983CC. The corresponding estimated clearance rates were 6.94, 4.90, 3.93, 1.92, 1.36, and 0.74 L/h for a 15.4 kg child and median (95% CI) observed mid-dose concentrations 1.55 (0.51-2.94), 2.20 (0.97-4.40), 2.03 (1.19-4.53), 7.55 (2.40-14.74), 7.79 (3.66-24.59) and 18.22 (11.84-22.76) mg/L, respectively. Simulations showed that wild-type individuals had exposures at the bottom of therapeutic range, while slower metabolisers were over-exposed.

CONCLUSIONS: Dosage guidelines for African children should take into consideration the combined effect of SNPs CYP2B6 516G > T and 983 T > C.