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2021
Ajama, OD, Awoyemi MO, Arogundade AB, Dasho OA, Falade SC, Hammed OS, Shode OH.  2021.  Deep Crustal Network of the Equatorial Atlantic Fracture Zones in Southern Nigeria, 2021. :100027.: Elsevier Abstract
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Adewara, BA, Badmus SA, Olugbade OT, Ezeanosike E, Adegbehingbe BO.  2021.  Distribution of phthisis bulbi and status of fellow eyes at a tertiary eye-care centre in Nigeria: a ten-year review, 2021. African Health Sciences. 21(1):437-44.: African Journals Online (AJOL) AbstractWebsite
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Akpa, OM, Okekunle AP, Ovbiagele B, Sarfo FS, Akinyemi RO, Akpalu A, Wahab KW, Komolafe M, Obiako R, Owolabi LF, Ogbole G, Fawale B, Fakunle A, Asaleye CM, Akisanya CO, Hamisu DA, Ogunjimi L, Adeoye A, Ogah O, Lackland D, Uvere EO, Faniyan MM, Asowata OJ, Adeleye O, Aridegbe M, Olunuga T, Yahaya IS, Olaleye A, Calys-Tagoe B, Owolabi MO.  2021.  Factors associated with hypertension among stroke-free indigenous Africans: Findings from the SIREN study, 2021. Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 23(4) Abstract

Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for stroke and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) globally. Understanding risk factors for hypertension among individuals with matching characteristics with stroke patients may inform primordial/primary prevention of hypertension and stroke among them. This study identified the risk factors for hypertension among community-dwelling stroke-free population in Ghana and Nigeria. Data for 4267 community-dwelling stroke-free controls subjects in the Stroke Investigative Research and Education Network (SIREN) study in Nigeria and Ghana were used. Participants were comprehensively assessed for sociodemographic, lifestyle and metabolic factors using standard methods. Hypertension was defined as a previous diagnosis by a health professional or use of an anti-hypertensive drug or mean systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) of hypertension and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) at p <.05. Overall, 56.7% of the participants were hypertensive with a higher proportion among respondents aged ≥60 years (53.0%). Factors including physical inactivity (aOR: 9.09; 95% CI: 4.03 to 20.53, p <.0001), diabetes (aOR: 2.70; CI: 1.91 to 3.82, p <.0001), being ≥60 years (aOR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.77, p <.0001), and family history of CVD (aOR 2.02; CI: 1.59 to 2.56, p <.0001) were associated with increased aOR of hypertension. Lifestyle factors were associated with hypertension in the current population of community-dwelling stroke-free controls in west Africa. Community-oriented interventions to address sedentary lifestyles may benefit this population and reduce/prevent hypertension and stroke among them.

Sarfo, FS, Akpa O, Ovbiagele B, Akpalu A, Wahab K, Komolafe M, Obiako R, Owolabi L, Osaigbovo GO, Jenkins C, Ogbole G, Fakunle A, Tiwari HK, Arulogun O, Arnett DK, Asowata O, Ogah O, Akinyemi RO, Owolabi MO.  2021.  Influence of age on links between major modifiable risk factors and stroke occurrence in West Africa, 2021. Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 428 Abstract

Background The burden of stroke in Africa is high. Understanding how age associates with major modifiable stroke risk factors could inform tailored demographic stroke prevention strategies. Purpose To quantify the magnitude and direction of the effect sizes of key modifiable stroke risk factors according to three age groups: <50 years (young), 50–65 years (middle age) and > 65 years (elderly) in West Africa. Methods This was a case-control study involving 15 sites in Ghana and Nigeria. Cases included adults aged ≥18 years with CT/MRI scan-typed stroke. Controls were age-and gender-matched stroke-free adults. Detailed evaluations for vascular, lifestyle and psychosocial factors were performed. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (aOR) using conditional logistic regression and population attributable risk (PAR) with 95% Confidence Interval of vascular risk factors by age groups. Results Among 3553 stroke cases, 813 (22.9%) were young, 1441 (40.6%) were middle-aged and 1299 (36.6%) were elderly. Among the 5 co-shared risk factors, dyslipidemia with PAR and aOR (95%CI) of 62.20% (52.82–71.58) and 4.13 (2.64–6.46) was highest among the young age group; hypertension with PAR of 94.31% (91.82–96.80) and aOR of 28.93 (15.10–55.44) was highest among the middle-age group. Diabetes with PAR of 32.29%(27.52–37.05) and aOR of 3.49 (2.56–4.75); meat consumption with PAR of 42.34%(32.33–52.35) and aOR of 2.40 (1.76, 3.26); and non-consumption of green vegetables, PAR of 16.81%(12.02–21.60) and aOR of 2.23 (1.60–3.12) were highest among the elderly age group. However confidence intervals of risk estimates overlapped across age groups. Additionally, among the young age group cigarette smoking, psychosocial stress and cardiac disease were independently associated with stroke. Furthermore, education, stress, physical inactivity and salt intake were associated with stroke in the middle-age group while cardiac disease was associated with stroke in the elderly age group. Conclusion There is a differential influence of age on the associations of major risk factors with stroke in this West African cohort. Targeting modifiable factors predominant within an age group may be more effective as a stroke prevention strategy.

Akpa, O, Sarfo FS, Owolabi M, Akpalu A, Wahab K, Obiako R, Komolafe M, Owolabi L, Osaigbovo GO, Ogbole G, Tiwari HK, Jenkins C, Fakunle AG, Olowookere S, Uvere EO, Akinyemi J, Arulogun O, Akpalu J, Tito-Ilori MM, Asowata OJ, Ibinaiye P, Akisanya C, Oyinloye OI, Appiah L, Sunmonu T, Olowoyo P, Agunloye AM, Adeoye AM, Yaria J, Lackland DT, Arnett D, Laryea RY, Adigun TO, Okekunle AP, Calys-Tagoe B, Ogah OS, Ogunronbi M, Obiabo OY, Isah SY, Dambatta HA, Tagge R, Ogenyi O, Fawale B, Melikam CL, Onasanya A, Adeniyi S, Akinyemi R, Ovbiagele B.  2021.  A Novel Afrocentric Stroke Risk Assessment Score: Models from the Siren Study, 2021. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 30(10) Abstract

Background: Stroke risk can be quantified using risk factors whose effect sizes vary by geography and race. No stroke risk assessment tool exists to estimate aggregate stroke risk for indigenous African. Objectives: To develop Afrocentric risk-scoring models for stroke occurrence. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 3533 radiologically confirmed West African stroke cases paired 1:1 with age-, and sex-matched stroke-free controls in the SIREN study. The 7,066 subjects were randomly split into a training and testing set at the ratio of 85:15. Conditional logistic regression models were constructed by including 17 putative factors linked to stroke occurrence using the training set. Significant risk factors were assigned constant and standardized statistical weights based on regression coefficients (β) to develop an additive risk scoring system on a scale of 0–100%. Using the testing set, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves were constructed to obtain a total score to serve as cut-off to discriminate between cases and controls. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) at this cut-off. Results: For stroke occurrence, we identified 15 traditional vascular factors. Cohen's kappa for validity was maximal at a total risk score of 56% using both statistical weighting approaches to risk quantification and in both datasets. The risk score had a predictive accuracy of 76% (95%CI: 74–79%), sensitivity of 80.3%, specificity of 63.0%, PPV of 68.5% and NPV of 76.2% in the test dataset. For ischemic strokes, 12 risk factors had predictive accuracy of 78% (95%CI: 74–81%). For hemorrhagic strokes, 7 factors had a predictive accuracy of 79% (95%CI: 73–84%). Conclusions: The SIREN models quantify aggregate stroke risk in indigenous West Africans with good accuracy. Prospective studies are needed to validate this instrument for stroke prevention.

Komolafe, MA, Sanusi AA, Idowu AO, Balogun SA, Olorunmonteni OE, Adebowale AA, Fawale MB, Mosaku KS.  2021.  Sleep medicine in Africa: Past, present, and future, 2021. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 17(6) Abstract

Interest in sleep and sleep disorders in Africa dates back thousands of years, influenced by various cultural and religious beliefs. However, the practice of sleep medicine as a specialty has been inadequate compared to other regions of the world. The objective of this study was to explore the current status of sleep medicine in Africa vis-à-vis education, professional societies, and facilities, and to identify challenges of the specialty in the region. A literature search of major electronic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar) was done. This revealed that there is a high prevalence of sleep disorders in Africa and a significant association with epilepsy, human African trypanosomiasis, human immunodeficiency virus, and other diseases. There are 6 sleep societies in Africa located in 4 countries. Forty-one sleep laboratories were identified located in 4 countries. The challenges hindering development of sleep medicine in Africa include lack of awareness, poor funding, lack of facilities, and inadequate training.

Awoyemi, MO, Ajama OD, Adekola SA, Arogundade AB, Fashina CD, Akinlade GO, Oyekunle JAO.  2021.  Water and sub-soil contamination in the coastal aquifers of Arogbo, Ondo State, Nigeria, 2021. 38:100944.: Elsevier Abstract
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Olagunju, A, Adeola F, Olagunoye A, Ojo T, Adefuye B, Fagbamigbe A, Adebiyi A, Olagunju O, Ladipo O, Akinloye A, Adeagbo B, Onayade A, Bolaji O, Happi C, Rannard S, Owen A.  2021.  Efficacy and safety of nitazoxanide plus atazanavir/ritonavir for the treatment of moderate to severe COVID-19 (NACOVID): A structured summary of a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, 12. Trials. 22 Abstract
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Alatise, O, Knapp G, Sharma A, Chatila W, Arowolo O, Olasehinde O, Famurewa O, Omisore A, Komolafe A, Olaofe O, Katung A, Ibikunle D, Egberongbe A, Olatoke S, Agodirin S, Adesiyun O, Adeyeye A, Kolawole O, Olakanmi A, Kingham T.  2021.  Molecular and phenotypic profiling of colorectal cancer patients in West Africa reveals biological insights, 11. Nature Communications. 12 Abstract
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Ojediran, OJ, Olatunde D, Aderibigbe V, Abolusoro S, Dahunsi A, Odekanle E, Odejobi O, Ibikunle R, Ogunwole J.  2021.  Valorization of Pennisetum purpureum (Elephant grass) and piggery manure for energy generation, 10. Fuel. 302:121209. Abstract
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Efobi, U, Oluwabunmi A, Atata S.  2021.  Age at First and Current Marriage and Women’s Entrepreneurship in Nigeria, 08. Feminist Economics. 27:1-26. Abstract
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Oginni, O, Oloniniyi I, Ibigbami O, Ugo V, Amiola A, Ogunbajo A, Esan O, Adelola A, Daropale O, Ebuka M, Mapayi B.  2021.  Depressive and anxiety symptoms and COVID-19-related factors among men and women in Nigeria, 08. PLOS ONE. 16:e0256690. Abstract
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Lyra Jr, H, Collaborative G, Nepogodiev D, Simoes J, Li E, Picciochi M, Glasbey J, Baiocchi G, Blanco-Colino R, Chaudhry D, Alameer E, Elsanhoury K, Funmi W, Ghosh D, Gujjuri R, Harrison E, Lule H, Kaafarani H, Nabian MH, Egbuchulem I.  2021.  Effects of pre-operative isolation on postoperative pulmonary complications after elective surgery: an international prospective cohort study, 08. Anaesthesia. Abstract
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Daniyan, M, Adeyipo T, Oyemitan I, Okwuese P, Victor O E, Akanmu M.  2021.  In vivo and in silico studies of Dennettia tripetala essential oil reveal the potential harmful effects of habitual consumption of the plant seed, 08. Toxicology Reports. 8 Abstract
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Babatola, A, Olatunya O, Ogundare E, Ajibola A, Ojo T, Oluwayemi O, Aebukola A, Adeniyi A, Komolafe A, Fadare J, Oyelami O.  2021.  Pediatric Discharges Against Medical Advice: A Review of Cases in Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria, 08. Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics. In Press Abstract
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Fasiku, A, Abdulsamad I, Adegoke J, Afolabi A, Adedayo S, Olanipekun A, Ojo T.  2021.  Perception of Medical Students on the Effect of Covid-19 on Medical Education in Nigeria, 08. International Journal of Medical Students. Abstract
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O.I.N, B, Bolarinwa O, A. A, J O, O A, Oguntayo R.  2021.  Psychiatric Morbidity among Undergraduate Students of University of Ilorin Kwara State Nigeria, 08. European Psychiatry. 64:S121. Abstract
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Lyra Jr, H, Collaborative G, Arnaud A, Azevedo J, Bravo A, Chaudhry D, Alameer E, Elsanhoury K, Elhadi M, Emile S, Gallo G, Glasbey J, Isik A, Jones C, Leventoğlu S, Li E, Martin J, Mohan H, Soon WC.  2021.  SARS-CoV-2 infection and venous thromboembolism after surgery: an international prospective cohort study, 08. Anaesthesia. Abstract
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Amedari, M, Akinsulore A, Ogunbodede E, Jeboda S.  2021.  A comparative study of oral health status of outpatients with mental disorders and healthy controls in a Nigerian tertiary hospital, 07. Journal of Primary Care Dentistry and Oral Health. 2 Abstract
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Erinosho, K, Anozie A, Odejobi O, Braimah M, Adeaga O.  2021.  EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF LOCALLY MADE PARABOLIC TROUGH SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR UNIT, 07. Abstract
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Adegoke, A, Oladokun T, Ayodele T.  2021.  A post-occupancy evaluation of students' halls of residence in, 07. Abstract
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Melesse, DY, Maulide Cane R, Mangombe A, Ijadunola M, Manu A, Bamgboye E, Mohiddin A, Muhumuza Kananura R, Akwara E, Plessis E, Dibaba Y, Mutua M, Mekonnen W, Faye C, Neal S, Ties B.  2021.  Inequalities in early marriage, childbearing and sexual debut among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, 06. Reproductive Health. 18 Abstract
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