Factors associated with hypertension among stroke-free indigenous Africans: Findings from the SIREN study

Citation:
Akpa, OM, Okekunle AP, Ovbiagele B, Sarfo FS, Akinyemi RO, Akpalu A, Wahab KW, Komolafe M, Obiako R, Owolabi LF, Ogbole G, Fawale B, Fakunle A, Asaleye CM, Akisanya CO, Hamisu DA, Ogunjimi L, Adeoye A, Ogah O, Lackland D, Uvere EO, Faniyan MM, Asowata OJ, Adeleye O, Aridegbe M, Olunuga T, Yahaya IS, Olaleye A, Calys-Tagoe B, Owolabi MO.  2021.  Factors associated with hypertension among stroke-free indigenous Africans: Findings from the SIREN study, 2021. Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 23(4)

Abstract:

Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for stroke and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) globally. Understanding risk factors for hypertension among individuals with matching characteristics with stroke patients may inform primordial/primary prevention of hypertension and stroke among them. This study identified the risk factors for hypertension among community-dwelling stroke-free population in Ghana and Nigeria. Data for 4267 community-dwelling stroke-free controls subjects in the Stroke Investigative Research and Education Network (SIREN) study in Nigeria and Ghana were used. Participants were comprehensively assessed for sociodemographic, lifestyle and metabolic factors using standard methods. Hypertension was defined as a previous diagnosis by a health professional or use of an anti-hypertensive drug or mean systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) of hypertension and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) at p <.05. Overall, 56.7% of the participants were hypertensive with a higher proportion among respondents aged ≥60 years (53.0%). Factors including physical inactivity (aOR: 9.09; 95% CI: 4.03 to 20.53, p <.0001), diabetes (aOR: 2.70; CI: 1.91 to 3.82, p <.0001), being ≥60 years (aOR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.77, p <.0001), and family history of CVD (aOR 2.02; CI: 1.59 to 2.56, p <.0001) were associated with increased aOR of hypertension. Lifestyle factors were associated with hypertension in the current population of community-dwelling stroke-free controls in west Africa. Community-oriented interventions to address sedentary lifestyles may benefit this population and reduce/prevent hypertension and stroke among them.

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